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I have been on the raw diet and am really missing beans. I could soak them over nite with baking soda instead of cooking them but everytime i try to soak dry beans it turns out horriable. So i usually buy organic beans in a can. I keep reading how beans are toxic. I wonder.. If something is toxic raw. then maybe we should listen to nature and not eat it.. such as potatoes and beans.

Black beans.. white northen beans.. with alittle toasted garlic, onion, olive oil.. love em!

What is your experience with beans and toxicity?

I also read that lentals are less toxic...

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i get the canned beans and rinse them thoroughly when i do eat them. which is once in a while. my favorite recipe is homemade "refried beans". basically get organic pinto beans, rinse them and then mash them. warm on low heat and then add onion, garlic, pepper, a little sea salt, salsa and organic coconut oil! so good and rich and satisfying. you dont have to cook it at a high heat, your basically just warming it up because the beans are already edible from the can. i make a raw taco salad then with romaine, "refried beans", fresh salsa, fresh corn, fresh guacamole, black olives, mmmm so good.

i eat a very high raw diet too and lately have been avoiding beans but i might eat them occasionally in the future if i feel like it.

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I made black beans for lunch.. and my skin seems to inflammed and breaking out.. i'm not sure if it's possible to break out with in hours but man, I did. It must be the starch.

well.. back to my raw diet with no beans......

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sorry to hear that :(

it seems a lot of people have problems with beans. they are one of the foods that actually help me clear up because i guess the low GI. however, they make me bloated and gassy so i dont really eat them regularly.

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One mans cure, is another mans poision..

which sucks, when searching for "healthy alternatives",and not "bad foods"...

This shit sucks...The same thing happened to me, when I added oatmeal, and avacaldos, from others advice...I broke out huge..

And now I think the eggs I am eating, has to go as well :cry: .

my chin is really oily since I have been eating these "organic eggs".

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You can saute them... for black beans i usually start my sauting some onions in olive oil, then throw in some garlic, then i add a cup of broth and drained can of beans. let it boil for minute and put on low with cover for about 15 minutes.. sometimes if i have it i add a scoop of salsa into the beans.. just for little flavor.

for white northern beans.. i saute onions then garlic in olive oil.. add beans and spinach or kale or collard greens... (lightly steamed half way before sauting them.. only saute them for a few minutes) then add cherry tomatoes..

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So if you want to nuetralize the lectins so to speak a good way would be to soak for, actually how long do you soak beans?? i've no idea; and then cook them for at least 3-4 mins?

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Soaking is not an essential step in bean preparation. The purpose of soaking is to begin rehydration before cooking, thereby reducing cooking time. Unsoaked beans take longer to cook and require more attention so they won’t cook dry.

During soaking, beans make up their lost water, increasing up to twice their dried size. Enough water must be used to keep the beans covered while soaking. Once rehydrated, beans cook in 1 to 3 hours, depending on the type of bean.

There are basically two methods for soaking: long-soak and quick-soak. Both work equally well and differ only in the amount of time required to rehydrate the beans. Choose the one which best suits your time and schedule.

Long-soaking takes time and some advance planning, but needs very little effort. First, cover the beans with water at room temperature. Soak them overnight or for 8 to 10 hours. Keep the beans covered by water while soaking. Be sure the soak water is at room temperature. Hot water may cause the beans to sour. Cold water slows rehydration and the beans will take longer to cook.

Cooking time will also be longer if beans are not soaked long enough – at least 8 hours. Beans soaked longer than 12 hours can absorb too much water and lose their characteristic texture and flavor. If you plan to cook beans for dinner and you want to use the long-soak method, start soaking in the morning. To cook beans for lunch, you’ll have to soak them overnight.

Quick-soaking rehydrates dried beans in little more than 1 hour. For most cooks, this is the most convenient method. Bring the beans and water for soaking to a boil. Boil for 2 minutes. Remove the beans from the heat and cover the pot. Let the beans stand in the soak water for 1 hour. At the end of the hour, discard the soak water and cook the beans.

Hot-soak. The Preferred Hot Soak is the newest method for soaking beans. Instructions for the Preferred Hot Soak are as follows:

After sorting and rinsing the beans, in a large pot add 10 cups of water for each pound (2 cups) of dry beans. Bring to a boil. Boil for 2 or 3 minutes, remove from heat, cover and stand at least 1 hour (quick-soak method), but preferably 4 hours or more; maximum 24 hours. (The longer soaking time is recommended to allow a greater amount of sugar to dissolve, thus helping the beans to be more easily digested.) Whether you soak the beans for one hour or several, discard soak water; rinse beans and pan. Return beans to pan, add fresh cold water to fully cover the beans, 1-2 teaspoons oil or shortening and 2 teaspoons salt, if desired. Simmer the beans gently with the lid tilted until they are tender, to avoid breaking the skins. If you wish to further season your cooked beans, adding vegetables and spices to the cooking water will enhance their flavor.

http://www.centralbean.com/storeandsoak.html

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