Jump to content
Acne.org
Search In
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
strawberries

for those who have diabetes in family or insulin sensitive

Recommended Posts

I just read an article in veg times about insulin sensitivities and diabetes. It said those whose parents or grandparents that have diabetes are most likey to be insulin sensitive. For women it cause PCOS and acne. It was interesting reading about the diet. It states: Getting fatty foods off your plate a good way to "clean out" your cells, so to speak and a good way to tackle insulin resistance. The most powerful diet set animal products aside, keep vegetable oil low, and emphasize natural foods-beans, whole grains, vegetables, and fruits. Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine studies have shown that these foods can reduce insulin resistance, promote weight loss, and dramatically improve diabetes.

So be easy on the fats,, good fats and bad fats.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I just read an article in veg times about insulin sensitivities and diabetes. It said those whose parents or grandparents that have diabetes are most likey to be insulin sensitive. For women it cause PCOS and acne. It was interesting reading about the diet. It states: Getting fatty foods off your plate a good way to "clean out" your cells, so to speak and a good way to tackle insulin resistance. The most powerful diet set animal products aside, keep vegetable oil low, and emphasize natural foods-beans, whole grains, vegetables, and fruits. Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine studies have shown that these foods can reduce insulin resistance, promote weight loss, and dramatically improve diabetes.

So be easy on the fats,, good fats and bad fats.

I think you mean insulin resistant, not insulin sensitive. Insulin sensitivity is a good thing.

I don't agree with the article, unless they can back up their point about fat cells being "dirty." Cells are supposed to be made up of fat partially, and for some reason, this article is putting out the illusion that "dirty" cells are littered with fat or something. I highly doubt this is the case.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have type 1 diabetes and require 4-5 insulin shots a day. Fat or no fat, until they discover a cure, my body will require insulin to stay alive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A build up of fat particles in cells interferes with insulin's ability to open the cell membrane and allow glucose inside.

Researches at Yale University scanned the muscles cells of young adults whose parents or grandparents had diabetes. Even though these young people were slim and healthy, many had microscopic fat particles already building in their muscle cells, suggesting they were headed for diabetes.

(Insulin resistance is the condition in which normal amounts of insulin are inadequate to produce a normal insulin response from fat, muscle and liver cells. Insulin resistance in fat cells reduces the effects of insulin and results in elevated hydrolysis of stored triglycerides in the absence of measures which either increase insulin sensitivity or which provide additional insulin)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Saturated fat decreases insulin sensitivity by changing membrana viscosity.

So indeed for a person with insulin resistance going a lower fat but adequate EFA route is useful.

That being said is far better to reverse insulin resistance from the source: body fat and excessive calories.

Even losing half pound of body fat is enough to improve insulin sensitivity by 60%.

Now most claim that they're not fat but they're probably using the BMI and falling in the 23-24 range.

But it doesn't matter your BMI, if you have excessive or localized fat you are fat.

Most people are skinny all over and have fat deposits in their abdomen.

Even when your abdomen is flat and you think of yourself as skinny, your muscles might carry all the fat you need to compromise insulin sensitivity. It is called marbelization and it is the saturation of muscle fibers with lipids. So people might believe they're thin and muscular but their muscular might be "fatty" and not only play havoc with their health but also with their aestethic (fatty muscles are not toned, shaped and long)

Calorie excess is the other primary source cause of insulin resistance. The cells block the insulin receptors because they recognize a condition of fullness and caloric saturation. Insulin resistance has been named by the researchers on syndrome X as the "body mechanism to prevent further fat gain". Fasting reverses insulin resistance in 2 days. The majority of people consume too much calories. You have those eating mostly veggies and hypocaloric foods but flooding them with liquid fats. You have those eating so many naked calories that their hunger signals keep going and they need to overeat in order to get enough nutrients.

You have those eating so absently and quickly that the feedback of satiety and fullness don't have time to work (if you chew and eat slowly you automatically eat less)

You have those believing that fatty bulk is the best way to gain weight and get muscular.

You have the poor young children victims of parents that pretend to be still in war times (even if they have never expeirenced war or famine to begin with) and consider fatty children healthy children and force their children to eat even when not hungry or to finish what's in the plate when all they want is leaving the table and running.

You have those eating out of habits as much food as they would eat when and if active (sedentarity decreases a lot caloric needs)

And finally you have those small people with poor muscular tone that have an absurd basal metabolic rate and without some intense activity would be doomed to eat a starvation amount of calories in order not to gain weight.

A insulin resistant body needs to be re-educated in consuming sugars during activity and fats during rest. When this doesn't occur the body tends to go hyperglycemic during activity and hypoglycemic during rest (the typical fogginess) This means that an exercise plan is required.

Carbs should be reduced so as to match more realistically the real amount of energy consumed daily and fats should be reduced in order to prevent the impermeability of the membrane. This automatically translates in less calories and plus exercise in fat loss. The diet should have enough fats anyway to match caloric needs, lipid needs and mantain palability. EFA should not be reduced. Proteins, as always, should remain baseline, based on optimum lean body weight (not current weight)

Once the body starts working again before we started abusing me mercilessly and we found a natural hunger control which automatically limits calories to the amout we really needs without the need for frequent eating and snacks; it's amazing to realize how many extra useless calories we used to consume ... even if we believed to eat little and far less than most people we know.

Researches at Yale University scanned the muscles cells of young adults whose parents or grandparents had diabetes. Even though these young people were slim and healthy, many had microscopic fat particles already building in their muscle cells, suggesting they were headed for diabetes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your totally misunderstanding my point. I'm not saying, all you need is a low fat diet. I'm not referring to those who have diabetes, either.

Yes, exercise plays a huge role in everyones health and general wellbeing.

I know there are a lot of women here with PCOS. PCOS causes acne, irregular periods, hair growth, weight gain, oily skin, ovarian cysts, skin discoloration, high cholesterol, elevated blood pressure, and infertility. My grandmother had diabetes and all my aunts and cousins have PCOS. Many women on this board are on an diet for their acne. I am also. I am not eating gluten, dairy, meat, and sugar. Most of us have been eating a lot of avocados, nuts, fatty oils and are still complaining about having acne. So why not try to limit fats and see if your acne and other PCOS symptoms lessen?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So why not try to limit fats and see if your acne and other PCOS symptoms lessen?

You mean saturated fats mostly because mono and poly don't have insulin impermeability effect on the cell membranes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So why not try to limit fats and see if your acne and other PCOS symptoms lessen?

You mean saturated fats mostly because mono and poly don't have insulin impermeability effect on the cell membranes.

Cells are made up partially of saturated fat, along with polyunsaturated fat and also cholesterol. It's not so much about reducing saturated fat as it is about fixing the ratios of fatty acids in your diet.

I think that the levels of saturated fat in the Western diet is fine. Now that we've replaced butter and milk with margarine and skim, it could hardly be argued that we're eating too much saturated fat. I think we get too many omega-6 fatty acids from vegetable oils and feedlot meat, too few omega-3s, and generally not enough to monounsaturated fat to balance everything out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Um I would just recomend looking outside this group because they seem very very radical

to quote a member

"I don't think you'd have to kill too many researchers. I think for five lives, 10 lives, 15 human lives, we could save a million, 2 million, 10 million non-human lives."

So they are fine with publishing things that use you as the lab mouse as long as it saves lab mice. but anyway I won't beleive this unless you can find a credable source that says the same thing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So why not try to limit fats and see if your acne and other PCOS symptoms lessen?

You mean saturated fats mostly because mono and poly don't have insulin impermeability effect on the cell membranes.

Cells are made up partially of saturated fat, along with polyunsaturated fat and also cholesterol. It's not so much about reducing saturated fat as it is about fixing the ratios of fatty acids in your diet.

But insulin resistance is a momentary condition of metabolic mess and momentarily reducing saturated fat further helps because of their not so positive effect in relation to such condition.

That doesn't mean that an healthy, lean person with a good energy balance and activity level is going to develop insulin resistance by eating much saturated fats. It only applies to a wrecked metabolism which might need all the help it can get including the reduction of substance that further increase the impermeability of cell membrana IF there's already a cellular resistance.

I think that the levels of saturated fat in the Western diet is fine. Now that we've replaced butter and milk with margarine and skim, it could hardly be argued that we're eating too much saturated fat. I think we get too many omega-6 fatty acids from vegetable oils and feedlot meat, too few omega-3s, and generally not enough to monounsaturated fat to balance everything out.

The problem is nutrition is out of control.

We're recklessly overeating carbs and fats of whatever kind.

We're getting too much carbs from pasta, too much carbs from sugar, too much carb from fructose syrup, too much carb from drink, too much fat from dressings, too much fat from added hydrogenated fats, too much fat from fried foods, too much fat from pastries and candies, too much fat from cured meat, hamburger and fast foods. I think it's hard to point out whether the consumption of a certain nutrient is excessive as long as the whole dietary consumption is excessive. As long as we overeat, we overeat in everything. The only exception is protein which has remained baseline the whole time and whatever diet you choose tend always to maintain a fixed amount.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Um I would just recomend looking outside this group because they seem very very radical

to quote a member

"I don't think you'd have to kill too many researchers. I think for five lives, 10 lives, 15 human lives, we could save a million, 2 million, 10 million non-human lives."

So they are fine with publishing things that use you as the lab mouse as long as it saves lab mice. but anyway I won't beleive this unless you can find a credable source that says the same thing.

??????????? Where did you quote that from?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
"I don't think you'd have to kill too many researchers. I think for five lives, 10 lives, 15 human lives, we could save a million, 2 million, 10 million non-human lives.

It's clearly a provocative witty remark made to show the double-standard.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Your totally misunderstanding my point. I'm not saying, all you need is a low fat diet. I'm not referring to those who have diabetes, either.

Yes, exercise plays a huge role in everyones health and general wellbeing.

I know there are a lot of women here with PCOS. PCOS causes acne, irregular periods, hair growth, weight gain, oily skin, ovarian cysts, skin discoloration, high cholesterol, elevated blood pressure, and infertility. My grandmother had diabetes and all my aunts and cousins have PCOS. Many women on this board are on an diet for their acne. I am also. I am not eating gluten, dairy, meat, and sugar. Most of us have been eating a lot of avocados, nuts, fatty oils and are still complaining about having acne. So why not try to limit fats and see if your acne and other PCOS symptoms lessen?

I believe this has actually worked for me. There was a time when I was eating practically no grains, no dairy, sugar, etc etc, but a lot of fat (olive oil, almonds, avocados, coconut oil) and my acne got worse. More recently I've started eating dairy again in the form of yogurt (no fat) and even sometimes ice cream (which I shouldn't be doing, but sometimes I can't resist) and I've reduced fat a lot. Acne has improved. I even eat gluten sometimes. I seem to get flair ups when I eat too much fat (especially if consumed with higher GI carbs), am stressed, or eat too many high GI carbs in general.

Danny -- I didn't know that it was mostly saturated fats that cause the problems. Thank you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I believe this has actually worked for me. There was a time when I was eating practically no grains, no dairy, sugar, etc etc, but a lot of fat (olive oil, almonds, avocados, coconut oil) and my acne got worse. More recently I've started eating dairy again in the form of yogurt (no fat) and even sometimes ice cream (which I shouldn't be doing, but sometimes I can't resist) and I've reduced fat a lot.

Before anything I would blame and check calories.

Most people change diets without realizing whether they're increasing or decreasing their calories. No one counts and when they do they're always off by at least half thousands.

You have two categories. Those who are so carb addicted that if they don't regulate their carbs end up overeating them and control themselves better with fats, and those who have no problem eating just few carbs without cravings and instead if they had to switch to fat they don't realize they're overeating on them by adding butter, oil and sauces freely everywhere. Clearly the first category do better with a lower carb diet and the second category with an higher carb diet. Both would do better to control how their calories keep lowering and raising as they switch from one diet to another. The point is that both fats and carbs are fattening because both have attributes that allow people to easily and unawarely overeating on them.

Fat simply are the most caloric dense and you can easily gulp down undred of calories just by adding olive oil or coconut oil indiscriminately to whatever meal. Carbs tend to be addictive so even if they're not so caloric dense and you can eat more you can end up eating a lot without realizing it. I'm saying this because I believe that chronic excess calories have negative effects on the body including on those systems impairtments that lead to acne.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Im IR!! What are some fats I should consume or is it none at all? I eat a lot of fruits and veggies. Should I be taking omega 3's like flaxseed oil? I dont want omega 6's since we have too many of those I need omega 3s.... or are u saying NO fats at all (meaning no omega 3s?)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Im IR!! What are some fats I should consume or is it none at all? I eat a lot of fruits and veggies. Should I be taking omega 3's like flaxseed oil? I dont want omega 6's since we have too many of those I need omega 3s.... or are u saying NO fats at all (meaning no omega 3s?)

Are you exercizing?

Your shouldn't find IR with diet alone.

Take high quality fish oil in moderate and correct amount.

Moderate saturated fats and decrease the consumption of both caloric dense carbs and fats.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello!

Are you talking about type 1 diabeties or type 2 ?

I'm assuming type 2.

About insulin resistance - surely the point is to eat a diet with a low GI or GL ? I.e. to avoid blood sugar peaks and surges of insulin?

And to keep a optimal BMI body weight and to exercise frequently (and presumably, not to eat excessive calories?)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
About insulin resistance - surely the point is to eat a diet with a low GI or GL ? I.e. to avoid blood sugar peaks and surges of insulin?

The point I made that strawberry misunderstood is that sugar and insulin spikes are not fixed attributes of foods. There's no such a thing as a food causing "fast insulin and sugar spikes".

The spikes are caused by the body within which that food is consumed. It's like metabolism.

There's no such a thing as a fixed inborn metabolism because all the things that form a metabolism are not fixed but change overnight and according to your body composition, physical activity, general health, caloric intake, sleep pattern and more. Likewise whether a food causes an adverse reaction depends on the body which is metabolizing that food and it's actual (changeable) conditions.

A food that causes a certain reaction in an inflamed, overfat, sedentary, insomniac body will never cause the same reaction in a lean, active, athletic and lifestyle balanced body. That's why it's absord to talk of food reaction, no food has a intrinsic own reaction ... only body have variable and changeable reactions to foods. And that's why I keep saying that the healthier you are the less foods are dangerous for you and the less restrictive you need to be.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I dont have diabetes. I think my insulin resistant is the cause of my acne. I am not overweight but I have PCOS, so they say. I dont have cysts on my ovairies, nor am i overweight, and i have regular periods. I just am IR, high testosterone, and hirsutism.

I eat healthy I stay away from bread, pasta, potatoes, fast foods, and I eat lots of fruits and veggies.

I guess I just need to add fish oils.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
nor am i overweight

Remember that overweight is a meaningless term.

For the most your body doesn't care about your weight but about your body fat.

You can be underweight and have too much health-damaging body fat expecially intramuscular triglycerides or intraorgan saturated adipocites.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry for bringing back up a kind of forgotten thread but there are some inaccuracies that need to be clarified:

"Dietary fat and insulin action in humans

The work at that stage then prompted an assessment

of how these results might relate to those available

regarding the effects of diets relatively high in fat on

whole-body, and in particular muscle, insulin action

in humans. The influence of the fatty acid profile was

also examined. While there is literature on diet and

glucose tolerance, it is complicated by alterations in

insulin secretion (particularly important when dietary

fat subtypes are considered [30]) and analysis

was restricted to studies which had employed currently

acceptable techniques for the in vivo assessment

of insulin action. The results were surprising

[31]. Essentially, there were remarkably few studies

which had actually compared high fat, low carbohydrate

and lower fat, high carbohydrate (as per the

current recommendations) diets. Even in the few

studies we could identify [32-37], the results were

equivocal with no clear conclusion possible. More recent

studies again provide no clear direction, with

one actually showing poorer whole-body insulin action

with a high carbohydrate, compared to a higher

fat, diet [38].

Short-term dietary interventions aimed at changing

the type of fat, usually with fish oil supplements

to increase the proportion of highly unsaturated n-3

fatty acids, have not shown as dramatic a result as

might have been predicted from the rat studies. Although

positive results have been obtained in two investigations

using fish oil supplements [39, 40], there

were relatively modest improvements in insulin ac,

tion. Balanced against these results are two negative

studies [41, 42] which showed no change at all in insulin

action. One further positive study showed improved

insulin action where the manipulation was an

increase in the polyunsaturated to saturated fat ratio

[43].

Overall, one would have to conclude that the evidence

for changes in insulin action in humans with

short-term manipulation of dietary fat amount and

type is very limited and entirely inconclusive."

"In contrast to these relatively short-term intervention

studies, there is now accumulating evidence from

cross-sectional and epidemiological studies which appear

to link a higher fat, and particularly saturated

fat, intake with insulin resistance (albeit measured indirectly)

and progression to glucose intolerance and

diabetes........It is noteworthy that in a number of the studies just

discussed, a higher percentage of monounsaturated

fats was associated with increasing adiposity and indices

of insulin resistance. Focus in the diabetes literature

has been on major beneficial effects in shortterm

trials [54, 55] and these results are consistent

with the low rates of diabetes in areas with a highintake of olive oil. However, the epidemiological and

cross-sectional literature from North America and

Europe show positive relationships between the percentage

of monounsaturated fat intake and both measures

of insulin resistance [56] and worsening diabetes

outcome [49]. In the geographical areas of these

studies the dietary intake of monounsaturated fats is

largely in association with saturated fats (e. g. meat

and dairy products) and this may account for the apparent

inconsistencies in the effects of monounsaturates."

In case this is all tl:dr, short-term dietary fat intake changes don't affect much. Saturated fat increases insulin resistance. Monounsaturated fat decreases insulin resistance. A high fat diet with a majority of monounsaturated fats should have little effect on insulin sensitivity. Fish oil doesn't do much.

Source: http://www.springerlink.com/content/t514l0...85/fulltext.pdf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Personalized Advice Quiz - All of Acne.org in just a few minutes

×