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SweetJade1980

Fructose Converts to Fat Faster Than Other Sugars

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Honestly....I thought we figured this out years ago...the research was certainly there.

Fructose Converts to Fat Faster Than Other Sugars

By MedHeadlines • Jul 28th, 2008 • Category: Diet, Lifestyle, Medical Research, Obesity

A general assumption is that fructose means fruit and most of us don’t worry about getting too much sugar from our fruits because we just don’t eat them very often. We may be getting an overload of fructose without even being aware of it, though. And what’s even worse is that a researcher from the UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas has just discovered that fructose in the diet converts to fat faster than any other sweeteners available today.

Dr. Elizabeth Parks, an associate professor of clinical nutrition, says the kinds of foods we eat, especially the carbohydrates, influence fat synthesis and may have as big an effect in a weight-loss diet as counting calories. Traces of sugar occur naturally in many proteins (it’s the reason meats and pastries turn brown when cooked) but fruits and vegetables have the highest concentration of naturally occurring fructose. To test her theory, Parks and her colleagues recruited six healthy people for a three-part study using glucose- and fructose-sweetened breakfast drinks.

Sucrose is the complex form of sugar, meaning it’s made from two simpler sugars - glucose and fructose. The liver, working like a traffic cop, separates the glucose and fructose from the sucrose and sends each component, the glucose or the fructose, onto different routes, where one path leads to energy, to be burned as fuel as soon as possible, and the other path leads to long-term storage. As fat.

When the traffic cops in the liver (the triglycerides) encounter fructose, they send it into storage to become fat more quickly than they route the glucose to fat storage. Glucose is the preferred sugary fuel. The higher the concentration of fructose in the diet, the more fructose available to be converted into stored fat.

Parks’ six study participants drank a specially prepared fruit drink for breakfast. They ate a typical lunch four hours later. Their glucose levels were monitored throughout and the rate of lipogenesis was watched. Lipogenesis is the name of the process that converts the foods we eat into the fat we store, in all the places we’d rather not be storing it.

In blind and random order, each participant consumed a breakfast drink in one of three formulations. One drink was 100% glucose, mimicking the formula used in glucose-tolerance tests instrumental in diagnosing diabetes. A second drink was a 50:50 mixture of glucose to fructose. The third was 75% fructose.

When comparing the 100% glucose breakfast to the 50:50 formula, lipogenic activity became quickly apparent and more vigorous after ingesting the fructose in the 50:50 formula. The fat-building process was also activated when the 75% fructose mixture was consumed.

When the two high-fructose breakfast drinks were consumed, the build-up of stored fat continued into the afternoon, when the quick conversion of fructose to fat remained active during digestion of the lunch meal. The higher the concentration of fructose in the diet, the higher the rate of fat conversion.

All study participants were thin, in good health, with no known medical conditions that would impair sugar digestion and assimilation. Researchers suggest the fat-building result of a high-fructose diet may be different, perhaps exaggerated, in people with impaired digestive functions, such as diabetics, the obese, and people suffering from food allergies.

A very large percentage of pre-sweetened beverages and mass-produced food products on the American food market are processed with a specially formulated 55%-fructose version of corn syrup. It is listed in the ingredients list of most ready-to-eat food products and pre-sweetened beverages as “high fructose corn syrup†or simply HFCS. The manufactured food industry embraces HFCS because it is easier to blend and sweeter than table sugar. It’s also cheaper, too. Ingredients are listed on food labels according to the proportional amount of an individual ingredient to the others, with the first item being the most abundant. The closer to the beginning of the ingredients list, the more HFCS in the container.

Parks urges dieters to include a healthy amount of fruits in the daily diet while being mindful of fats, proteins, and all forms of added sugar. She feels a diet high in HFCS thwarts most efforts to lose weight, since it converts to fat for storage quicker than other sugars.

The Parks study was funded by The Sugar Association, the Cargill Higher Education Fund, and the National Institutes of Health. The Journal of Nutrition carries the full report in its current issue.

Source: UT Southwestern Medical Center

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Magnes Res. 2006 Dec;19(4):237-43. Links

High fructose consumption combined with low dietary magnesium intake may increase the incidence of the metabolic syndrome by inducing inflammation.

Rayssiguier Y, Gueux E, Nowacki W, Rock E, Mazur A.

INRA, Unité de Nutrition Humaine, Clermont Ferrand/Theix, 63122 Saint-Genès-Champanelle, France. [email protected]

The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of common pathologies: abdominal obesity linked to an excess of visceral fat, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and hypertension. This syndrome is occurring at epidemic rates, with dramatic consequences for human health worldwide, and appears to have emerged largely from changes in our diet and reduced physical activity. An important but not well-appreciated dietary change has been the substantial increase in fructose intake, which appears to be an important causative factor in the metabolic syndrome. There is also experimental and clinical evidence that the amount of magnesium in the western diet is insufficient to meet individual needs and that magnesium deficiency may contribute to insulin resistance. In recent years, several studies have been published that implicate subclinical chronic inflammation as an important pathogenic factor in the development of metabolic syndrome. Pro-inflammatory molecules produced by adipose tissue have been implicated in the development of insulin resistance. The present review will discuss experimental evidence showing that the metabolic syndrome, high fructose intake and low magnesium diet may all be linked to the inflammatory response. In many ways, fructose-fed rats display the changes observed in the metabolic syndrome and recent studies indicate that high-fructose feeding is associated with NADPH oxidase and renin-angiotensin activation. The production of reactive oxygen species results in the initiation and development of insulin resistance, hyperlipemia and high blood pressure in this model. In this rat model, a few days of experimental magnesium deficiency produces a clinical inflammatory syndrome characterized by leukocyte and macrophage activation, release of inflammatory cytokines, appearance of the acute phase proteins and excessive production of free radicals. Because magnesium acts as a natural calcium antagonist, the molecular basis for the inflammatory response is probably the result of a modulation of the intracellular calcium concentration. Potential mechanisms include the priming of phagocytic cells, the opening of calcium channels, activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, the activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NFkB) and activation of the renin-angiotensin system. Since magnesium deficiency has a pro-inflammatory effect, the expected consequence would be an increased risk of developing insulin resistance when magnesium deficiency is combined with a high-fructose diet. Accordingly, magnesium deficiency combined with a high-fructose diet induces insulin resistance, hypertension, dyslipidemia, endothelial activation and prothrombic changes in combination with the upregulation of markers of inflammation and oxidative stress.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1740229...Pubmed_RVDocSum

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If anyone's interested, I can post one of the corn industry's responses to all the attacks on HFCS.

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If anyone's interested, I can post one of the corn industry's responses to all the attacks on HFCS.

That would be cool. Although, it's not really about "corn syrup" so much as it is about the level of ADDED fructose found in food products. If there's more fructose than other sugars....and perhaps not enough fiber, nutrients (i.e magnesium, Vit. C, etc) than some people are going to have problems.

When I say Fructose Based I mean:

  • Fructose/Levulose

  • Corn Syrup

  • HFCS

  • Agave Nectar

  • Honey

  • Molasses

  • Maple Syrup

  • 100% Fruit Juice

http://www.uwhealth.org/servlet/Satellite?...amp;c=FlexGroup (I find this doesn't apply to me regarding fruits or veggies so I mustn't have Fructose Malabsorption or Intolerance)

Actually, I'm interested in ALL sweeteners that may yield the same result as Fructose does in the body. Minimal to no effect on blood sugar levels, but quickly raises fat, cholesterol and thus inflammation levels.

See that's the error when it comes to treating Diabetes. People think they need to worry soleyabout blood sugar, when they really need to focus a bit more on what's contributing to their "silent" inflammatory stateor rather, what's causing the inflammaiton, which subesequently downregulates the Glut4 cell receptors (that respond to insulin) and thus creates what is known as multiple degress of "insulin resistance" or more specifically, Glucose Intolerance issues.

I was at a candy store a few months back and the woman told her friend, a nurse, that she offers "sugar free fudge". Great you'd think, until you read the label on the window....This "sugar free fudge is made with Fructose",....That is not sugar free...and in the long run...will cause more harm than good. :wall:

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That would be cool. Although, it's not really about "corn syrup" so much as it is about the level of ADDED fructose found in food products. If there's more fructose than other sugars....and perhaps not enough fiber, nutrients (i.e magnesium, Vit. C, etc) than some people are going to have problems.

True, but it's corn syrup (specifically, high fructose corn syrup) that adds most of the fructose to today's diet.

I have to go in like a second but I'll post it this afternoon.

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The problem of fructose turning quicker to fat is a complete non-issue

The point is that only calories matter and the reason is that if you're consuming the amount of calories required to maintain your weight IF you store more fat you also burn more fat and IF you store less fat you also burn less fat. In other words at the end of the day fat stores all levels out and the end result is identical and based on total calories.

The problem is that all those who claim that certain things increase fat storage are talking on a "per meal" basis, which is completely irrelevant as what is matter is the end result at the end of the day.

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As promised:

Industry responds to fructose-obesity study

By Stephen Daniells

20-Mar-2007 - The Corn Refiners Association has responded to the recent research linking fructose consumption to obesity, stating that fructose cannot be related to high fructose corn syrup.

Last week FoodNavigator.com reported on a study from Barcelona, published in the journal Hepatology, which fed rats a liquid fructose beverage and found the metabolism of fat in the liver had been changed by impacting a specific nuclear receptor called PPAR-alpha, leading to a reduction in the liver's ability to degrade the sweetener.

Talking to FoodNavigator.com, Audrae Erickson, president of the CRA stated that links to high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) are not justified since fructose and HFCS are different. HFCS consists of 55 per cent fructose and 42 per cent glucose.

"It's like comparing night and day," she said.

"If you feed rats [fructose] beyond what you get in a normal diet you will get results [as seen in the Barcelona study]," said Erickson. "But HFCS contains about 50 per cent glucose, which acts a moderator to fructose."

Campaigners against the high fructose corn syrup ingredient point to epidemiological studies that have linked the consumption of sweetened beverages and obesity, as well as some science that claims that the body processes the syrup differently than other sugars due to the fructose content, leading to greater fat storage.

However, industry associations like the Corn Refiners Association (CRA) have repeatedly claimed there is no scientific evidence to suggest that HFCS is uniquely responsible for people becoming obese.

Indeed, Erickson pointed out that a new study, published in the peer-review journal Nutrition, reported that high fructose corn syrup fed to 30 lean female volunteers showed that the sweetener had the same effects as sucrose.

The women (average age 33, average BMI 22.4 kg per sq.m) were randomly assigned to consume either a sucrose- or HFCS-sweetened beverage providing 30 per cent of energy levels for one day. Blood samples were taken and glucose, insulin, leptin, and ghrelin levels measured. The women returned one month later to consume the other beverage. The study was double-blind, meaning neither the subjects nor the scientists knew which beverage was being given.

The researchers, led by Kathleen Melanson from the University of Rhode Island reported that no significant differences were observed between any of the measured blood variables were observed as a result of drinking the sucrose- or fructose-sweetened beverages.

"These short-term results suggests that, when fructose is consumed in the form of HFCS, the measured metabolic responses do not differ from sucrose in lean women," wrote Melanson.

"Further research is required to examine appetite responses and to determine if these findings hold true for obese individuals, males, or longer periods," she concluded.

Source: Nutrition

2007, Volume 23, Pages 103-112

"Effects of high-fructose corn syrup and sucrose consumption on circulating glucose, insulin, leptin, and ghrelin and on appetite in normal-weight women"

Authors: K.J. Melanson, L. Zukley, J. Lowndes, V. Nguyen, T.J. Angelopoulos, J.M. Rippe

Hepatology

Volume 45, Issue 3, Pages 778 - 788

"Impairment of hepatic Stat-3 activation and reduction of PPAR-alpha activity in fructose-fed rats"

Authors: N. Roglans, L. Vilà, M. Farré, M. Alegret, R.M. Sánchez, M. Vázquez-Carrera, J.C. Laguna

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As promised:

Industry responds to fructose-obesity study

By Stephen Daniells

20-Mar-2007 - The Corn Refiners Association has responded to the recent research linking fructose consumption to obesity, stating that fructose cannot be related to high fructose corn syrup.

Last week FoodNavigator.com reported on a study from Barcelona, published in the journal Hepatology, which fed rats a liquid fructose beverage and found the metabolism of fat in the liver had been changed by impacting a specific nuclear receptor called PPAR-alpha, leading to a reduction in the liver's ability to degrade the sweetener.

Talking to FoodNavigator.com, Audrae Erickson, president of the CRA stated that links to high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) are not justified since fructose and HFCS are different. HFCS consists of 55 per cent fructose and 42 per cent glucose.

"It's like comparing night and day," she said.

"If you feed rats [fructose] beyond what you get in a normal diet you will get results [as seen in the Barcelona study]," said Erickson. "But HFCS contains about 50 per cent glucose, which acts a moderator to fructose."

Campaigners against the high fructose corn syrup ingredient point to epidemiological studies that have linked the consumption of sweetened beverages and obesity, as well as some science that claims that the body processes the syrup differently than other sugars due to the fructose content, leading to greater fat storage.

However, industry associations like the Corn Refiners Association (CRA) have repeatedly claimed there is no scientific evidence to suggest that HFCS is uniquely responsible for people becoming obese.

Indeed, Erickson pointed out that a new study, published in the peer-review journal Nutrition, reported that high fructose corn syrup fed to 30 lean female volunteers showed that the sweetener had the same effects as sucrose.

The women (average age 33, average BMI 22.4 kg per sq.m) were randomly assigned to consume either a sucrose- or HFCS-sweetened beverage providing 30 per cent of energy levels for one day. Blood samples were taken and glucose, insulin, leptin, and ghrelin levels measured. The women returned one month later to consume the other beverage. The study was double-blind, meaning neither the subjects nor the scientists knew which beverage was being given.

The researchers, led by Kathleen Melanson from the University of Rhode Island reported that no significant differences were observed between any of the measured blood variables were observed as a result of drinking the sucrose- or fructose-sweetened beverages.

"These short-term results suggests that, when fructose is consumed in the form of HFCS, the measured metabolic responses do not differ from sucrose in lean women," wrote Melanson.

"Further research is required to examine appetite responses and to determine if these findings hold true for obese individuals, males, or longer periods," she concluded.

Source: Nutrition

2007, Volume 23, Pages 103-112

"Effects of high-fructose corn syrup and sucrose consumption on circulating glucose, insulin, leptin, and ghrelin and on appetite in normal-weight women"

Authors: K.J. Melanson, L. Zukley, J. Lowndes, V. Nguyen, T.J. Angelopoulos, J.M. Rippe

Hepatology

Volume 45, Issue 3, Pages 778 - 788

"Impairment of hepatic Stat-3 activation and reduction of PPAR-alpha activity in fructose-fed rats"

Authors: N. Roglans, L. Vilà, M. Farré, M. Alegret, R.M. Sánchez, M. Vázquez-Carrera, J.C. Laguna

@SweetJade: I also found something linking gluten intolerance to Vitamin D deficiency and gut bacteria.

Thanks for the article. I came across similar minds on a blog earlier today. The thing is....I've heard (must find evidence of)...that HFCS can have anywhere from 55% - 90% Fructose....so, it's interesting that the talk is only of 55% Fructose blends.

Yes, you would think that Sucrose and Corn Syrup would produce the same results considering that Corn Syrup is supposed to be a 50/50 blend as well. Yet, just as is the case with Hydrogenated Oils (may still contain partially hydrogenated oils/trans fats) and avoidance of this is suggested, the same thought is at play here. Avoid Corn Syrup because it may have more Fructose.

Regardless of whether one chooses to believe that fructose will make you fatter, it still increases triglycerides levels, cholesterol levels, and inflammation levels a lot more than glucose does. There are numerous studies to support this and makes it's involvment suspect in the development of the Metabolic Syndrome or rather, the Silent Chronic Inflammatory Disease.

As for anecdotal evidence, I also came across people that lost 15 lbs once they dropped the fructose containing foods. Usually if you stop eating one thing, you'll replace it with something else...though sweets/desserts may not neccessarily have been replaced. Regarding acne sufferers, some of us know that when we avoid it the acne or cystic acne disappears.

Depending on your metabolism and sensitivity level, "a calorie is not a calorie" and a gram is not a gram. In fact, for moi 4g of Sucrose = a pustule where as 4g of HFCS = a Cyst I do eat corn...so it's certainly nothing against what this sweetener is made from.

Now, as for the other part, was it is you that mentioned a specific type of good bacteria useful in aiding the metabolism of gluten?

Thanks

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