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CurryGirl

What's REALLY in your makeup?

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There is currently a lack of enforcement and regulation by the FDA. And it's not just makeup! Its overall skin care, hair care, eye care, nail care, baby care, and oral care. Hundreds of ingredients that are proven to cause or influence diseases as serious as cancer could be in your everyday products. This is a cause for concern. You, as a consumer, have the right to know what kind of products you are using. Just what are those long-named ingredients, and more importantly, what do they do?

Find out here:

http://www.cosmeticsdatabase.com/

Skin Deep was made by a non-profit organization (Environmental Working Group) and is a cosmetic database that is concerned with the consumer's well-being. It’s not in any way a scam, a way to extort money, or a way to mislead you with false information. This is simply for the general public’s education.

"Skin Deep pairs ingredients in more than 25,000 products against 50 definitive toxicity and regulatory databases, making it the largest integrated data resource of its kind. Why did a small nonprofit take on such a big project? Because the FDA doesn't require companies to test their own products for safety."

From the Why does it matter page (http://www.cosmeticsdatabase.com/research/whythismatters.php)

"Have you ever counted how many cosmetics or personal care products you use in a day?

Chances are it's nearly 10.

And chances are good that they include shampoo, toothpaste, soap, deodorant, hair conditioner, lip balm, sunscreen, body lotion, shaving products if you're a man, and cosmetics if you are a woman. And what about your children? On any given day you might rub, spray, or pour some combination of sunscreen, diaper cream, shampoo, lotion, and maybe even insect repellant on their skin.

Most people use these products without a second thought, and believe that the government must certainly be policing the safety of the mixtures in these myriad containers. But they are wrong about this. The government does not require health studies or pre-market testing for these products before they are sold. And as people apply an average of 126 unique ingredients on their skin daily, these chemicals, whether they seep through the skin, rinse down the drain, or flush down the toilet in human excretions, are causing concerns for human health, and for the impacts they may have to wildlife, rivers and streams."

Why does the FDA allow this? How can they do this?

"No safety testing. According to the agency that regulates cosmetics, the FDA's Office of Cosmetics and Colors, "...a cosmetic manufacturer may use almost any raw material as a cosmetic ingredient and market the product without an approval from FDA" (FDA 1995). The industry's self-policing safety panel falls far short of compensating for the lack of government oversight. An EWG analysis found that in its 30-year history, the industry's self-policing safety panel has reviewed the safety of just 11 percent of the 10,500 ingredients used in personal care products. FDA does no systematic reviews of safety. And collectively, the ingredients in personal care products account for one of every eight of the 82,000 chemicals industries have registered for commercial use with the Environmental Protection Agency.

* Nearly 90 percent of the 10,500 ingredients FDA has determined are used in personal care products have not been evaluated for safety by the CIR, the FDA, or any other publicly accountable institution."

This doesn't just affect humans!

"A growing number of studies in the field of testing that targets what are known as "PPCPs" — pharmaceuticals and personal care products — finds our personal care product ingredients in rivers and streams across the country. And some ingredients have been linked to impacts in wildlife - those that target the hormone system, for example, that have been linked to feminization of fish and other aquatic life.

Personal care products are chock full of chemicals that act like estrogen and that raise concerns with respect to wildlife. Examples? Fifty-seven percent of all products contain paraben preservatives, nearly two percent contain surfactants called alkylphenols and just over two percent contain estrogenic sunscreen ingredients, according to EWG's 2004 product assessment.

EWG's research shows that 50 percent of all products on the market contain added "fragrance," complex mixtures of chemicals, some persistent, some neurotoxic, and some newly found to harm wildlife. Researchers at Stanford University published work in 2004 showing that mussels lost their ability to clear their bodies of poisons when exposed to parts-per-billion levels of common fragrance musks."

More pages to check out:

http://www.cosmeticsdatabase.com/research/whythismatters.php --- again, read the rest of this page!

http://www.cosmeticsdatabase.com/special/whatnottobuy/ --- A list of ingredients to definitely avoid

http://www.cosmeticsdatabase.com/research/fdafails.php --- More information on the FDA

http://www.cosmeticsdatabase.com/research/topbrands.php --- Top 20 brands of concern

http://www.cosmeticsdatabase.com/research/topcompanies.php --- Top 20 companies of concern

http://www.cosmeticsdatabase.com/research/exposures.php --- A survey of real men and women. Exposure adds up.

Please, educate yourself, and if you have time, sign the petition. And if you don't believe any of this, well, it's your loss.

Spread the word!

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this website is already in my bookmarks. :)

while i do agree with its general stance on cosmetic safety, i take its advice on the ingredients with a grain of salt. sure there're studies done showing ingredient xx may be a carcinogen, but lots more show it's perfectly safe. a lot of those studies you'll have to read into carefully. some only show effects at high doses, or when inhaled, or only under certain conditions. cosmeticsinfo.org is another website that discusses ingredients and its potential safety concerns without getting pple all paranoid. a good read.

anyway, i am concerned about safety, so i've simplified my routine as much as possible and will only purchase products with "safer" ingredients. :D

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this website is already in my bookmarks. :)

while i do agree with its general stance on cosmetic safety, i take its advice on the ingredients with a grain of salt. sure there're studies done showing ingredient xx may be a carcinogen, but lots more show it's perfectly safe. a lot of those studies you'll have to read into carefully. some only show effects at high doses, or when inhaled, or only under certain conditions. cosmeticsinfo.org is another website that discusses ingredients and its potential safety concerns without getting pple all paranoid. a good read.

That's very true. However, my stance on the matter is that if there's any doubt, it just shouldn't be there. Relying completely on the database is not my intention either, some of it is common sense.

Like you're not supposed to use electrical products around water. That's a very obvious "duh" but the warning might not be there if someone hadn't done it. Which is also like the list of toxic ingredients, an ingredient would not be on the list if it was shown not to be harmful.

I've also looked into cosmeticsinfo.org and simplified my routine :)

I also care very much about the rapid loss of biodiversity and although there are many, many factors leading up to that these toxins are contributing to that -- perhaps just slightly, but a little goes a long way. What happens to one fish effects the bigger fish that eats that fish, and the even larger fish that eats the medium sized fish, and the large bird that eats the largest fish. Toxins get more and more concentrated as they flow higher up the food pyramid. And who are some of the top consumers? Us. We eat fish ourselves, we could just be harming ourselves. In fact, I do believe we are. What we do affects everyone else.

It's also very true that people should not be getting paranoid. I'm simply trying to get people aware :)

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all in all, i think the fda needs a kick in their ass in updating prohibited ingredients (like hydroquinone, sp?) and okaying better ingredients (like tinosorb)! i have a little more faith in the eu and japan in terms of cosmetic safety. they seem to be stricter and impose higher standards.

i agree with the biodiversity thing. i'm doing my best to go back to basics, like washcloth, soap, pure oils, etc. i think it'll benefit my skin, my body, and the environment.

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Guest kiwikali

that's exactly why i use natural products

and no makeup

well only eye makeup

and lip gloss

whatever. "]

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