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Dotty1

Low-Protein Diet might be the solution for me?

I know what you are thinking: A low-protein diet does not sound healthy.

I've been on my low-fat diet for several months now (20 grams of fat are allowed each day). Although my skin cleared up by 80%, there was still that 20% of blackheads/infections left.

I noticed that for one entire month, my skin cleared up 100% and I reviewed everything in my diet. I realized that I hadn't been eating large servings of protein.

I hadn't eliminated carbs (baked chips, bread, white rice =P), so I knew that wasnt the cause of my perfect skin.

As a test, I ate a large portion of protein (lentil soup). Within 2 days, dozens of blackheads reappeared. After my skin got clear again (I stayed away from large protein sources), I ate a veggie patty. 2 days later a ton of blackheads showed up.

After I started suspecting that large sources of protein were causing my problems, I found a study that states that "low-protein diets fed to rats reduced insulin secretion islets by 70%."

Source: http://jn.nutrition.org/cgi/reprint/125/7/1923.pdf Read the first paragraph.

I shall continue testing this diet.

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I really can't take your diet ideas seriously, Dotty. If you advocate eating bread and baked chips, and suggest that protein and fat indirectly break you out...

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I didnt mean to insinuate that I was only eating only bread and chips =P. I was noting that I had not eliminated carbs.

My diet consists of: Salads, veggie subway sandwhiches, pasta & marinara, whipped potatos, veggie lasagna, veggie soups, minestrone soups, fruits, chips & salsa, popcicles, veggie pot pie, sushi, indian foods, ethiopian foods...

The moment I have a large serving of protein, I get tons of blackheads. Very small servings dont affect me.

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Look, pretty much all foods will stimulate insulin to a degree, but carbs will do so much more than fat or protein. Insulin resistance occurs when there is too much insulin being produced, so it makes sense that if you want to reduce your insulin, and thus your insulin resistance, you reduce carbs. Reducing calories also helps, to an extent.

By replacing fat and protein in your diet with carbs, you are making yourself produce more insulin. I know about your theory about how fat clogs up your cells or whatever, but it's the truth that all cells are made up of fat and cholesterol somewhat. And protein provides the structure for just about your entire body. Carbs do very little for you compared to fat and protein, and yet here you are, saying that a severely low-fat, low-protein, high-carb diet is the best diet for insulin resistance.

Finally, Americans were less inuslin resistant when they ate more fat and less carbs--I'm not sure if you're American or not, but it doesn't matter.

I will give your diet more consideration if you can:

1. Give some basis to it--if a low-fat, low-protein diet is good for insulin resistance, explain how ancient humans would have seeked out low-fat, low-protein foods to eat. Explain how some of the least insulin-resistant populations in the world nevertheless get plenty of fat in their diets.

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For the last few weeks, I have been reading studies which find "Low-protein diets reduced insulin secretion islets in rats by 70%."

There are several google articles about it. I am noticing that my skin is abolutely perfect when I avoid large sources of protein.

Study: http://jn.nutrition.org/cgi/reprint/125/7/1923.pdf

^Read the first paragragh.

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Dotty,

You have to understand, people become quiet skeptical when you post a "I'm 100% clear because of ____" thread every other week. Especially when you discredit those threads a week later saying "I was actually only 80% clear."

Maybe you should address the mental aspect of your holistic approach.

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Yes, that makes sense. Everything I've posted has worked except for DIM, which was accidently the most short lived and at the same time became the most popular =P.

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I only began eating legumes 3 years ago... but have had acne for 12 years. =(

Did anyone think the study I posted was interesting?

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I know what you are thinking: A low-protein diet does not sound healthy.

I've been on my low-fat diet for several months now (20 grams of fat are allowed each day). Although my skin cleared up by 80%, there was still that 20% of blackheads/infections left.

I noticed that for one entire month, my skin cleared up 100% and I reviewed everything in my diet. I realized that I hadn't been eating large servings of protein.

I hadn't eliminated carbs (baked chips, bread, white rice =P), so I knew that wasnt the cause of my perfect skin.

As a test, I ate a large portion of protein (lentil soup). Within 2 days, dozens of blackheads reappeared. After my skin got clear again (I stayed away from large protein sources), I ate a veggie patty. 2 days later a ton of blackheads showed up.

After I started suspecting that large sources of protein were causing my problems, I found a study that states that "low-protein diets fed to rats reduced insulin secretion islets by 70%."

Source: http://jn.nutrition.org/cgi/reprint/125/7/1923.pdf Read the first paragraph.

I shall continue testing this diet.

What strikes me as interesting is your large portion of protein is lentil soup and a veggie patty. I don't think I'm alone here in thinking that 1) I wouldn't qualify either of those as good quality protein sources and 2) both of those have potential acne-causing problems of their own (lectins, phytates, for the lentils and probably soy for the veggie burger?).

Have you tried animal protein sources? Maybe some chicken or an egg or 2? I'd recommend trying these before you decide low-protein is the way to go. Just my opinion.

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I only began eating legumes 3 years ago... but have had acne for 12 years. =(

So. Things change and your acne doesn't necessarily have one cause. You body is a system which tries to do it's best to compensate for various issues: lack of nutrients, stress, allergens and substances it can't digest, etc. And you specifically said you had large amounts and then broke out.

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I've heard crazier things I guess. What constitutes low protein for you- how much per serving and how much per day?

In the long run a very low fat, low protein diet based around carbs seems detrimental to the body, but keep the updates coming.

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In the long run a very low fat, low protein diet based around carbs seems detrimental to the body, but keep the updates coming.

Sorry, but this is total hogwash.

Even with 100% raw fruit and vegetable diet, assuming you eat sufficient calories, you won't be deficient in protein or essential fatty acids. There are thousands of people doing it all over the world and some of them are world-class competitive athletes.

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I do not want to start a debate here, but you show me an olympic/pro athlete that advocates a LOW PROTEIN DIET and I'll eat my words.

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It's funny, b/c a lot of people say the "beach" or "Swimming" clears up their acne. I think it is in fact the sun doing it, because I swim year round, but my skin only breaks out during the colder, rainy months. Since the swimming is a constant variable, it can't be that. I am guessing it is the sun...

I think I am going to try getting sun exposure to clear up my acne, and then eating as healthy as possible so it doesn't return.

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I do not want to start a debate here, but you show me an olympic/pro athlete that advocates a LOW PROTEIN DIET and I'll eat my words.

Great, let's not start a debate.

Here are few pro athletes for you. They don't necessarily advocate low protein diet, but they eat a diet that's low in protein compared to 'normal' diets. Many of them eat 100% raw vegan diet.

Carl Lewis

Carl Lewis on Being Vegan

http://earthsave.org/lifestyle/carllewis.htm

Martina Navratilova

She was 100% raw vegan when she was winning left and right

Dr. Douglas Graham was her nutrition coach during that time. Dr. Graham has coached many other pro and olympic level athletes also.

http://www.foodnsport.com/joomla/content/view/122/78/

Tim Van Orden

http://www.runningraw.com/

Organic Athlete Pro-Activist Team has few more examples

http://www.organicathlete.org/pro-activist

This is just few examples. It's not too difficult to find more.

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...

In the long run a very low fat, low protein diet based around carbs seems detrimental to the body, but keep the updates coming.

No, this is simply the truth. You guys simply do not understand the difference between vegan and low protein. Cutting out the two essential macro nutrients is madness.

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No, this is simply the truth. You guys simply do not understand the difference between vegan and low protein. Cutting out the two essential macro nutrients is madness.

Cutting out and reducing are two different things. Even raw fruits have fat and protein in them.

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Well you need proteins.

It's still debatable how much you really need but you can't do without them.

In fact it would be impossible. Even eating 2000 calories of bananas alone would provide at least 25 grams of proteins.

Proteins often stimulates insulin secretion more than carbs.

This is also why children on ketogenic diets to control their seizures needs to consume a lot amount of protein or they are out of ketosis and this is also why diabetics must bolus for protein as well and why a diets for diabetics can't be too high in proteins (without the correct insulin injection adjustments)

Insulin is required to send the amino acids into the cells and it's therefore normal that proteins stimulate insulin more than carbs. Beef stimulates insulin more than pasta.

Also comparison of low-carb diets versus higher-carb diets where the carbs were low-impact and not refined showed no advance of low-carb over higher-carb in controlling insulin, because the factor seems to be the impact of carbs not the amount (to a certain extent of course) Low-carb diets lower insulin but there's no evidence they lower insulin more than any other hypocaloric no-refined approach to eating.

But I have to insist in claiming that insulin per se is not the problem just like a knife is not the problem but what you're gonna do with it (are you going to kill a person on the street or cut some veggies to make a stir fry?)

Is the insulin secretion (not matter how big) the physiological consequence of eating macronutrients that require insulin to be processed properly? Then it is NOT a problem.

Is the insulin secretion the consequence of overeating, volatile blood sugar, refined carbohydrates consumption, non balanced nutrition? Then it IS a problem.

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neurotransmitters are made from protein as well as lots of other things if anything you should go on a high protein diet, plus if you are stressed your body burns more protein then usual so you might start losing muscle mass, which isnt gonna do crap to your acne.

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I concur Danny.

The only thing I wanted to make clear is that it is simply impossible for any athlete to thrive on a low protein diet and, yeah, 25grams protein from bananas is pretty darn low. Besides it's really naive to think athletes tell the whole story, or we'd know more about their drug abuse ;.)

Fruits may have some protein and some fat but do they have all the essential fats and amino acids?

Sure you can make sacrifices to get rid of acne, muscle wasting, though, wouldn't be something I'd want to go through just for that. If you want to get a definite cure, which might have severe side effects just get ROA...

Or if you really are that keen on your muscles wasting away you may start Calorie Restriction, at least you'll get some health benefits out of that!

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From the last researches I have seen only professional athletes need to raise their proteins considerably. Even non-sedentary people can do well with simply following the RDA which in itself contains two margins errors for absorption. There's no evidence that more proteins than what we need have any sort of advantage.

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