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robinh

Mandelic Acid Peel

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About 3 weeks ago I had a mandelic acid peel for the first time. It was done by an esthetician at my derm's office for $175 (ouch!). My skin looked fantastic almost immediately, and after a couple of days of peeling I went around with no makeup for the next couple of weeks. I was really radiant. Normally I have a fair amount of comedogenic acne, irritated looking skin and hyper-pigmentation (i'm in my 30's). I also get a few inflamed lesions here and there but usually not major. After the peel, my oil level went way down, and my skin just looked fantastic. I've done glycolic and lactic acid peels before and never got this kind of result.

I was wondering if anyone else has had a mandelic acid peel. I notice there's a lot of talk about the serums (I've just ordered some), but no one has mentioned having a peel done with it. I've also noticed it's pretty much impossible to find online as a peel, except in very low strengths mixed in with other acids.

I emailed Richard at Loganwood. He said he might be willing to get some made. He said he used to carry it, but he didn't like it as much as the other acids. I'm not sure why.

I'm wondering now if this was just a fluke. Anyone else have any experience with this?

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I wonder if there's any derma with MA peel in san francisco

since the serum is working quite fine to me

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I'm sure someone in SF can do it. Probably just need to call around. I just hate spending so much money on something you can do so cheaply at home.

I have been using the serum for two days now. So far there's no huge impact, but I've just started. It doesn't sting though.

I really feel that the mandelic acid has a unique effect compared to the other acids. it almost reminded me of azelaic acid--the way it seems to tighten and tone the skin and dry up the blemishes and oiliness. Maybe it's the antibacterial effect. I don't know. I just know I want more!

I am still talking to Richard at Loganwood. Hopefully he'll get some made for us. Whoever is interested, please post here, so he can see there is a demand for it.

just to clarify: the serum i referred to is the nucelle 10%. this isn't the same as the mandelic peel, which is at least 30 or 40%.

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I was wondering if there were mandelic acid peels....when I go to my new derm I will ask if it's an option for me. I am very interested in this...I really like mandelic acid serum as an everyday topical treatment.

Sounds like you had good results!

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I just heard back from Richard at loganwoodskincare.com. He said he'd try to get a mandelic peel formulated by the end of summer. If you're interested, keep checking his site! He's very helpful, and his peeling products are all very reasonably priced.

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if it as good as you are making it sound, you can put me on the list.

i was wondering tho is MA is right for me. i dont have many pimples.... right now with my retin-A treatment i have no bumpy pimples at all. all i got are humongous pores, 100000 blackheads, and oily skin. and by oily i mean i can fill a kleenex 2 hours after i wash my face.

any help?

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greasefactory: yeah, i have super oily skin too. i don't get much inflamed acne either. just clogged pores in all varieties. i can't guarantee this will help you. i've only tried it once myself. i just really want the opportunity to try it again and see if it works as well the second time. also curious to see how it works on others.

and by the way, if you do a peel, you have to stop the retinoids a few days in advance. not sure how long, but you should research it. i did a peel once after only stopping differin for two days. the areas where i typically applied differin were MUCH more sensitive. it was almost a disaster, but i rinsed it off really quick.

interestingly, the esthetician chose mandelic for me, because i have sensitive skin and because she said my skin was extremely dehydrated (even though it's oily) and sun-damaged. pretty weird.

by the way i've been on the 10% serum now for a few days. i think it's helping.

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if it as good as you are making it sound, you can put me on the list.

i was wondering tho is MA is right for me. i dont have many pimples.... right now with my retin-A treatment i have no bumpy pimples at all. all i got are humongous pores, 100000 blackheads, and oily skin. and by oily i mean i can fill a kleenex 2 hours after i wash my face.

any help?

Mandelic has a pore-tightening effect, and it generally works well for people with oily skin. But you have to be extremely careful using it with retinoids, especially something as strong as Retin A. You could take a lot of layers of skin off before you even realize it.

There have been a couple of studies on mandelic peels ... I seem to recall that they heal better than lactic and glycolic peels, and give better results. I'll try to find those. You might be able to come up with them by Googling.

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thanks lion queen. i've tried to google mandelic peels, but haven't come up with as much info as i hoped. let me know if you find anything good!

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Sonya -- serums are made by Vivant and NuCelle. Vivant's website is www.betterhealthyskin.com and NuCelle I think is www.nucelle.com ... NuCelle products are also sold on amazon.com and ebay.

Robin -- here's some info from a study NuCelle did some years ago:

Results

Preliminary results from the open clinical trials using these products are encouraging in several diverse areas related to skin care:

1. Fine wrinkles and lines appear to improve, much like photoaged skin does with the use of 10% glycolic acid preparations. Skin texture improves quickly withindays or weeks in characteristic AHA therapeutic fashion. A notable difference between glycolic acid and mandelic acid products is the lack of skin irritation and erythems that often accompanies skin treatments with glycolic acid in 30% to 70% preparations used for peeling. As with glycolic acid, the effect is sustained over months and years of treatment, with gradual and continued improvement in fine lines and wrinkles being the characteristic benefit.

It is noteworthy that a remarkable difference was seen in the tratment of darkly pigmented skin types. Improvement can be seen in fine wrinkles and lines in patients with Fitzpatrick skin types I through VI without any postinflammatory hyperpigmentation.

In contrast, tha author has observed in his dermatology practice a larger number of darkly pigmented patients who have developed irritation, erythema, and subsequent postinflammatory hyperpigmentation while treating the skin with 5% to 10% glycolic acid, tretinoin, or hydroquinone.

2. Chemical peeling with mandelic acid, when compared with glycolic acid peels, produced less erythema, and was less likely to result in crusting or blistering or other adverse effects on the epidermis. The onset of erythema is more predictable and gradual, and there is less likelihood that "hotspots" will develop in dry areas of the face (e.g., on the cheek lateral to the commissure). Repeated, weekly peeling with 5-minute exposure times, followed by washing with water, was well tolerated by most patients. Repeated peeling is useful for treating acne, melasma, lentigenes, and fine photoaging damage (e.g., wrinkles, dullness, skin texture changes).

3. Abnormal pigmentation, including melasma, postinflammatory hyperpigmentation, and lentigines, improved quickly when treated with mandelic acid products. In many patients, melasma improved up to 50% after 1 month of treatment using 10% mandelic acid lotion. Faintly pigmented lentigenes respond much more slowly-a result characteristic of treatment with other AHA products-with gradual fading over a period of weeks or months. Mandelic acid products used with prescription-strength bleaching agents containing hydroquinone or kojic acid also showed excellent fading with no adverse effects, and may hasten the benefits of treatment.

Dermal melasma has often been resistant to topical treatments, but marked improvement was seen in patients who had failed other topical treatments with tretinoin, hydroquinone, and steroids. Many of these patients were of darker skin types, and had experienced postinflammatory hyperpigmentationfrom other topical products. This was especially true of tretinoin and hydroquinone. No adverse darkening of the melasma was seen when these patients were treated with mandelic acid products. Dermal melasma responded much more slowly than epidermal melasma (as determined by Wood's light examination). A sustained, gradual improvement over a period of months is characteristic of patients treated with mandelic acid products. One notable patient of Italian descent had severe melasma on the forehead that was resistant to prescription bleaching agents and to tretinoin. Over 6 months, almost complete clearing of the melasma with the use of mandelic acid was seen. Some patients were treated with mandelic acid products plus PhotoDerm®(ESC Medical, Yokneam, Israel). Combination therapy may yield faster improvement.

4. Acne improvement is remarkable in many patients treated with inflammatory pustular, comedonal, and papular acne. Patients with gram-negative folliculitis also showed improvement while using mandelic acid products. Many acne patients who are resistant to antibiotics given both systemically and topically have responded very well to the mandelic acid. Patients with acne at grade 111 or below responded most positively.

Initial research on mandelic acid was predicated on its antibiotic nature. It was hoped that an improvement in wrinkles and acne could be obtained for patients who suffered from both. Many patients have been able to control their acne with mandelic acid products alone (i.e., without using traditional acne products). Mandelic acid has been found to be espeially useful in treating adult female patients suffering from both photoaging and acne. Some acne rosacea patients were also treated , and their conditions showed improvement.

5. Laser skin resurfacing patients have been treated over the past 11 months before and after the resurfacing procedure. Immediately after laser resurfacing and until reepithelialization, patients were treated with a semi-permeable ointment. The most notable result of using mandelic acid after laser peels was the lack of postoperative gram-negative infections in more than 100 cases. Patients used these products for 2 to 4 weeks before laser resurfacing and, after reepithelialization, started using maintenance products also containing mandelic acid. A semipermeable ointment allowed easy cleansing of the skin without occluding bacteria and dead skin fragments. When mandelic acid products were used operatively and postoperatively, postinflammatory hyperpigmentation rarely occurred.

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I was wondering if there were mandelic acid peels....when I go to my new derm I will ask if it's an option for me. I am very interested in this...I really like mandelic acid serum as an everyday topical treatment.

Sounds like you had good results!

hello if you still trying to buy mandelic acid peel i sell it 30% and 20%. great peel love it. i only sell the 50ml bottles

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About 3 weeks ago I had a mandelic acid peel for the first time. It was done by an esthetician at my derm's office for $175 (ouch!). My skin looked fantastic almost immediately, and after a couple of days of peeling I went around with no makeup for the next couple of weeks. I was really radiant. Normally I have a fair amount of comedogenic acne, irritated looking skin and hyper-pigmentation (i'm in my 30's). I also get a few inflamed lesions here and there but usually not major. After the peel, my oil level went way down, and my skin just looked fantastic. I've done glycolic and lactic acid peels before and never got this kind of result.

I was wondering if anyone else has had a mandelic acid peel. I notice there's a lot of talk about the serums (I've just ordered some), but no one has mentioned having a peel done with it. I've also noticed it's pretty much impossible to find online as a peel, except in very low strengths mixed in with other acids.

I emailed Richard at Loganwood. He said he might be willing to get some made. He said he used to carry it, but he didn't like it as much as the other acids. I'm not sure why.

I'm wondering now if this was just a fluke. Anyone else have any experience with this?

i sell mandelic acid 20% and 30 % in 50 ml. freat pee;

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