Jump to content
Acne.org
Search In
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
hipster23

Can you eat too much fruit?

Recommended Posts

I've heard about the benefits of fruit fasting and a high-fruit diets and yet the negative effects of the high fructose it contains. I typically eat about 5 pounds of fruit (thats like 1200 calories) from fruit daily ever since I got on the paleo diet, since its both tasty and available. I'm just wondering if this is too much of a good thing or not?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As long as you don't stuff yourself you can't eat too much fruit. Of course too much of anything can be bad, but as long as you don't eat more calories than you need you'll be fine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've heard about the benefits of fruit fasting and a high-fruit diets and yet the negative effects of the high fructose it contains. I typically eat about 5 pounds of fruit (thats like 1200 calories) from fruit daily ever since I got on the paleo diet, since its both tasty and available. I'm just wondering if this is too much of a good thing or not?

Well, how's your skin? I know that eating a lot of fruit breaks me out.... but it may not be the same for you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It all depends on how sensitive you are to carbs, and which fruits you can tolerate.

Citrus fruits are a common allergen, so you might not be able to tolerate oranges or grapefruit or the like; apples and pears are high in sugar but low in nutrients. Keep in mind that the more carbs you eat, the more Vitamin C you need. So if you're downing 16 grams of sugar from an apple and only getting 4 mg of Vitamin C in return, there could be a problem. Same goes for bananas.

The best-tolerated fruit are probably berries, which are lower in sugar and more dense with nutrients. Unfortunately, you can expect that conventionally-grown berries will be high in pesticides because of their delicacy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm just wondering if this is too much of a good thing or not?

Absolutely. Once, I was vacationing in the tropics, ate one serving of some very delicious, region-specific fruit, and then I was told that it was a powerful laxative. That was a great day spent in the loo :rolleyes: .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm just wondering if this is too much of a good thing or not?

Absolutely. Once, I was vacationing in the tropics, ate one serving of some very delicious, region-specific fruit, and then I was told that it was a powerful laxative. That was a great day spent in the loo :rolleyes: .

Not watermelon, I imagine, right?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It all depends on how sensitive you are to carbs, and which fruits you can tolerate.

Citrus fruits are a common allergen, so you might not be able to tolerate oranges or grapefruit or the like; apples and pears are high in sugar but low in nutrients. Keep in mind that the more carbs you eat, the more Vitamin C you need. So if you're downing 16 grams of sugar from an apple and only getting 4 mg of Vitamin C in return, there could be a problem. Same goes for bananas.

The best-tolerated fruit are probably berries, which are lower in sugar and more dense with nutrients. Unfortunately, you can expect that conventionally-grown berries will be high in pesticides because of their delicacy.

So the glucose eats the Vitamin C? I looked into this, and it says that sugar and Vitamin C 'completes' for one another. I dont get what Vitamin C has to do with sugar... I didn't even know about this.

So everytime you eat a sugary fruit, you'd eat some lemon or something?

Also, would the same concept apply for white bread? Something high in the glycemic index?

Oh, and for the poster, I tend to break out when eating sugary fruits. I have no clue why, maybe it's the Vitamin C thing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So the glucose eats the Vitamin C? I looked into this, and it says that sugar and Vitamin C 'completes' for one another. I dont get what Vitamin C has to do with sugar... I didn't even know about this.

So everytime you eat a sugary fruit, you'd eat some lemon or something?

Also, would the same concept apply for white bread? Something high in the glycemic index?

Oh, and for the poster, I tend to break out when eating sugary fruits. I have no clue why, maybe it's the Vitamin C thing.

I think it's just that with higher levels of carbs, your body needs more Vitamin C to deal with them. I couldn't tell you the exact chemical process or anything.

It's kind of like chromium: a mineral needed for proper insulin functioning. The best sources of chromium tend to be ones that are highest in sugar (such as molasses). Just look at fruit, which is nature's natural sugar. Usually it comes with a good dosage of Vitamin C. Grains, however, usually have indetectable levels of Vitamin C. Maybe that's one reason they're so problematic?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been on paleo diet for two weeks and I eat around three apples a day, or sometimes two apples and a banana or even two bananas and one apple.

So far I felt no link at all to my skin.

Back a few years ago I was making daily smoothies that had two kiwis, a banana, orange juice, and two raw eggs, and it made the back of my neck FULL of white heads which I never get there usually.

So since then I have stopped drinking orange juice and I had been avoiding kiwis and bananas as well as eggs. Well it looks like it wasn't the bananas. And I suspect it was the raw eggs, or the mixing of everything together.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Keep in mind that the more carbs you eat, the more Vitamin C you need. So if you're downing 16 grams of sugar from an apple and only getting 4 mg of Vitamin C in return, there could be a problem. Same goes for bananas.

LOL

Interesting comment... so by this definition the people who eat the most fruits and carbs should be the most deficient in vitamin C. Funny enough, but I don't see raw fooders (who eat 80+% of their calories from fruits) suffering from scurvy or dropping dead from vitamin deficiencies.

Seriously man... where did you get that statement? The late and very dead Dr. Atkins?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Keep in mind that the more carbs you eat, the more Vitamin C you need. So if you're downing 16 grams of sugar from an apple and only getting 4 mg of Vitamin C in return, there could be a problem. Same goes for bananas.

LOL

Interesting comment... so by this definition the people who eat the most fruits and carbs should be the most deficient in vitamin C. Funny enough, but I don't see raw fooders (who eat 80+% of their calories from fruits) suffering from scurvy or dropping dead from vitamin deficiencies.

Seriously man... where did you get that statement? The late and very dead Dr. Atkins?

What rakbs said is true. As you know carbohydrates are broken down into glucose. Glucose and ascorbic acid are transported to cells by insulin, but they compete with each other for the transportation. So if you eat a large amount of carbohydrates then yes you will need to get more vitamin c. As long as there is a balanced carb and vitamin C intake then there shouldn't be any problem.

The raw foodists who eat 80+% fruit probably get eanough vitamin c intake to prevent the scurvy and immune system problems.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Glucose and ascorbic acid are transported to cells by insulin, but they compete with each other for the transportation.

Yes, I wasn't arguing about that point.

You guys contradict yourself quite badly. You say that glucose and vitamin C compete against each other for the same transportation system. Which, at least in theory, is true. So the more carbs you eat the less vitamin C is available. Because the transportation system is blocked with glucose. So no matter how much vitamin C you have in the blood it can't get into the cells. Essentially it would be useless.

On the other hand you say that you need to get more vitamin C if you eat more sugar. But I thought that it's an issue with availability of the transportation mechanism instead of plasma vitamin C levels. Hence getting more vitamin C would only result in increased concentration of vitamin C in the urine (since you can't use it, you simply piss it out).

So which one it is?

The reason I'm picking this point to pieces is that it's obvious carbophobic fear mongering with no basis on reality. You are taking a small aspect of the issue and blowing it out of all proportions. Finally the whole idea is based on flawed hypothesis.

In the 1970s, Emeritus Professor John T. A. Ely, University of Washington, proposed his Glucose-Ascorbate Antagonism (GAA) theory that predicts high glucose levels hinder vitamin C entry into cells. Animals which make their own vitamin C use dietary glucose as the raw material and the ascorbate and glucose molecules are similar. The similarity extends past molecular structure to the way they are attracted to, and enter, cells. Both molecules require help from the pancreatic hormone insulin before they can penetrate cell membranes using special "pumps." The name for the process that propels glucose and Vitamin C (the reduced form) through cell membranes is Insulin-mediated uptake.

Combining these ideas, we postulate that cells that can’t absorb glucose are not absorbing vitamin C either. As blood glucose levels rise, the GAA theory predicts that vitamin C uptake is greatly diminished throughout the body, even in cells with undamaged insulin pumps. Our conjecture is that the serious health consequences of prolonged Type II diabetes, e.g. blindness, wounds that won't heal, limb amputation, etc., are the result of the lack of vitamin C inside cells.

http://www.internetwks.com/owen/gaa.html

Although the biosynthetic relationship between glucose and ASC is absent in man, the glucose/insulin system does influence ASC metabolism. In particular, the cellular uptake of vitamin C is regulated by both glucose and insulin and the renal reabsorption of ASC is impaired by hyperglycemia [4].

The Glucose/Insulin System and Vitamin C: Implications in Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus

http://www.jacn.org/cgi/reprint/17/2/105.pdf

As those quotes show the notion that carbohydrates inhibit vitamin C absorption is not correct. Hyperglycemia does.

In other words when your cells can't absorb glucose they can't absorb vitamin C either.

Hyperglycemia and insulin resistance are not caused by carbs. They are an issue with insulin receptor. There are many reasons for that.

And you can reverse the condition also with low-fat, high-carb, high-fiber diet.

Finally... even if what you've said wouldn't have been based on a flawed hypothesis, it still wouldn't gel with reality.

According to your theory people who eat more carbs should be more vitamin C deficient. Clearly this is not the case.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm just wondering if this is too much of a good thing or not?

Absolutely. Once, I was vacationing in the tropics, ate one serving of some very delicious, region-specific fruit, and then I was told that it was a powerful laxative. That was a great day spent in the loo :rolleyes: .

Not watermelon, I imagine, right?

No. It had "fur" on the peel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm just wondering if this is too much of a good thing or not?

Absolutely. Once, I was vacationing in the tropics, ate one serving of some very delicious, region-specific fruit, and then I was told that it was a powerful laxative. That was a great day spent in the loo :rolleyes: .

Not watermelon, I imagine, right?

No. It had "fur" on the peel.

How many legs did it have.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

just go with moderation.

whatever it is on this board people choose to go for, practice moderation, not "eat a ton of this" or "eat none of that". you'll have a much better experience and probably better results

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Personalized Advice Quiz - All of Acne.org in just a few minutes

×