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You've got to be kidding me. C'mon Dingo, there are plenty of studies. Go pubmed it. This is established knowledge. There is no point in challenging it....

I just cut and paste a few for you...there have been so many studies on this, it's ridiculous.

Ultraviolet radiation and skin aging: roles of reactive oxygen species, inflammation and protease activation, and strategies for prevention of inflammation-induced matrix degradation - a review.Pillai S, Oresajo C, Hayward J.

Engelhard Corporation, Long Island, New York, NY, U.S.A.

Inflammation and the resulting accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in the intrinsic and photoaging of human skin in vivo. Environmental insults such as ultraviolet (UV) rays from sun, cigarette smoke exposure and pollutants, and the natural process of aging contribute to the generation of free radicals and ROS that stimulate the inflammatory process in the skin. UV irradiation initiates and activates a complex cascade of biochemical reactions in human skin. In short, UV causes depletion of cellular antioxidants and antioxidant enzymes (SOD, catalase), initiates DNA damage leading to the formation of thymidine dimmers, activates the neuroendocrine system leading to immunosuppression and release of neuroendocrine mediators, and causes increased synthesis and release of pro-inflammatory mediators from a variety of skin cells. The pro-inflammatory mediators increase the permeability of capillaries leading to infiltration and activation of neutrophils and other phagocytic cells into the skin. The net result of all these effects is inflammation and free radical generation (both reactive oxygen and nitrogen species). Furthermore, elastsases and other proteases (cathepsin G) released from neutrophils cause further inflammation, and activation of matrix metalloproteases. The inflammation further activates the transcription of various matrixes degrading metalloproteases, leading to abnormal matrix degradation and accumulation of non-functional matrix components. In addition, the inflammation and ROS cause oxidative damage to cellular proteins, lipids and carbohydrates, which accumulates in the dermal and epidermal compartments, contributing to the aetiology of photoaging. Strategies to prevent photodamage caused by this cascade of reactions initiated by UV include: prevention of UV penetration into skin by physical and chemical sunscreens, prevention/reduction of inflammation using anti-inflammatory compounds (e.g. cyclooxygenase inhibitors, inhibitors of cytokine generation); scavenging and quenching of ROS by antioxidants; inhibition of neutrophil elastase activity to prevent extracellular matrix damage and activation of matrix metalloproteases (MMPs), and inhibition of MMP expression (e.g. by retinoids) and activity (e.g. by natural and synthetic inhibitors).

Solar UV irradiation and dermal photoaging.Wlaschek M, Tantcheva-Poór I, Naderi L, Ma W, Schneider LA, Razi-Wolf Z, Schüller J, Scharffetter-Kochanek K.

Department of Dermatology, University of Cologne, Joseph-Stelzmann-Strasse 9, 50931 Cologne, Germany.

The skin is increasingly exposed to ambient UV-irradiation thus increasing risks for photooxidative damage with long-term detrimental effects like photoaging, characterized by wrinkles, loss of skin tone and resilience. Photoaged skin displays alterations in the cellular component and extracellular matrix with accumulation of disorganized elastin and its microfibrillar component fibrillin in the deep dermis and a severe loss of interstitial collagens, the major structural proteins of the dermal connective tissue. The unifying pathogenic agents for these changes are UV-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) which deplete and damage non-enzymatic and enzymatic antioxidant defense systems of the skin. As well as causing permanent genetic changes, ROS activate cytoplasmic signal transduction pathways in resident fibroblasts that are related to growth, differentiation, senescence and connective tissue degradation. This review focuses on the role of UV-induced ROS in the photodamage of the skin resulting in clinical and biochemical characteristics of photoaging. In addition, the relationship of photoaging to intrinsic aging of the skin will be briefly discussed. A decrease in the overall ROS load by efficient sunscreens or other protective agents may represent promising strategies to prevent or at least minimize ROS-induced photoaging.

PMID: 11684450 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE

Photoaging: pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment.Kang S, Fisher GJ, Voorhees JJ.

Department of Dermatology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA.

Premature skin aging, or photoaging, results largely from repeated exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun. Photoaging is characterized clinically by wrinkles, mottled pigmentation, rough skin, and loss of skin tone; the major histologic alterations lie in dermal connective tissue. In recent years, a great deal of research has been done to explain the mechanism by which UV induces dermal damage. This research has enabled the identification of rational targets for photoaging prevention strategies. Moreover, studies that have elucidated photoaging pathophysiology have produced significant evidence that topical tretinoin (all-trans retinoic acid), the only agent approved so far for the treatment of photoaging, also works to prevent it. This article summarizes evidence mainly from studies of human volunteers that provide the basis for the current model of photoaging and the effects of tretinoin.

I highlighted one thing that struck me, and that UV rays leads to depletion of antioxidants. Having enough of these nutrients allows one to be protected from the sun. The very thing that helps promote a healthy life is also the same thing that degrades it. I never said to spend hours in the sun to get vitamin D, for most of us we do not need to spend a lot of time in the sun. But here, I'll copy and paste a study that shows that sunlight is actually anti-aging:

WASHINGTON, D.C. (November 8, 2007)- There is a new reason for the 76 million baby boomers to grab a glass of milk. Vitamin D, a key nutrient in milk, could have aging benefits linked to reduced inflammation, according to a new study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

In a genetic study of more than 2,100 female twin pairs ages 19-79, British and American researchers found that higher vitamin D levels were linked to improved genetic measures of lifelong aging and chronic stress. Using a genetic marker called leukocyte telomere length (LTL), they found those with the highest vitamin D levels had longer LTL, indicating lower levels of inflammation and body stress. The telomere difference between those with the highest and lowest vitamin D levels was equivalent to 5 years of aging.

Previous research has found that shortened LTL is linked to risk for heart disease and could be an indication of chronic inflammation – a key determinant in the biology of aging. While there are several lifestyle factors that affect telomere length (obesity, smoking and lack of physical activity), the researchers noted that boosting vitamin D levels is a simple change to affect this important marker.

Studies continue to link vitamin D to an array of health benefits, securing vitamin D’s “super nutrient” status and providing even more reasons to get adequate amounts of this essential vitamin. Recent research suggests that beyond its well-established role in bone health, vitamin D also may help reduce the risk of certain cancers and autoimmune diseases, such as type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis.

Milk is a primary source of calcium and vitamin D in the American diet. In fact, government reports indicate that more than 70 percent of the calcium in our nation’s food supply comes from milk and milk products. Additionally, milk is one of the few food sources of vitamin D, which is fast emerging as a “super nutrient.”

The recommended three servings of low fat or fat-free milk provides 900 mg of calcium, 300 IU of vitamin D and 80 mg of magnesium daily.

###

Richards JB, Valdes AM, Gardner JP, Paximadas D, Kimura M, Nessa A, Lu X, Surdulescu GL, Swaminathan R, Spector TD, Aviv A. Higher serum vitamin D concentrations are associated with longer leukocyte telomere length in women. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 2007;86:1420-1425.

Granted the article advises drinking milk to get vitamin D (which I don't recommend since you need to drink gallons upon gallons of it), but clearly sunlight helps prevent aging. You're wondering why I would promote sun over supplements, and the very reason is that vitamin D from the sun is more tightly regulated and has a greater half life.

All I wanted was some evidence that showed sun promotes aging (even if they are hypotheses), yet other studies show sun prevents aging. I can at least respect people who provide some evidence against me. But I go by not only research but intuition. I need both, not just one. I go for sun to get vitamin D (though on days that I can't, I take supplements) because our ancestors evolved on it and we have not evolved so much to the point where we don't need it. We are still genetically very similar to our ancestors and I live my life as close to them as possible. My intuition says that our ancestors knew this fact, and ate the right foods to keep the human race, not only alive but strong and healthy. My research also states that cancer rates have gone up and autoimmune diseases have gone up since the industrial revolution where we have spent far more time indoors than outdoors.

Additionally tribes like the Kitavan and Ache, the acne free populations who spend the majority of their time outdoors have no acne, diabetes, hypertension, or other western aspects of aging. Yet the diseases I just listed are WESTERN diseases, where we spend most of our times indoors.

Looking at the research and my intuition based on the tribes of the Kitavan and Ache, whoever created us made us so that sunlight is a vital nutrient and one of the most important ones at that. I will not wear sunscreen because of that and do plan to spend time outdoors. But I'm not an idiot (well, depends on who you ask), I won't sunburn myself. But sunscreen is overated and was created several decades ago...just as disease rates went up.

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Uh, john? Those weren't studies, those were just huge hypotheses.

The third "study" references "a great deal of research [that] has been done to explain the mechanism by which UV induces dermal damage."

If you can find some of said research, it would be great.

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rackb: The reason why you don't see many "studies" done on showing that UV causes DNA tumors is that this fact already established and procedural. It's very procedural in the lab setting that you can induce tumors (essentially the result of accumulated mutations) in cell lines using UV radiation, a mutagen. Many of the antioxidants we take (fish oil, lycopene, vitamin e, and bilberry) have bene shown to increase one's resistance to UV damage, giving you SPF protection. Unless you think those antioxidants are doing a bad thing by giving us SPF protection. I really can't see why you don't concede that UV causes damage to the skin....

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rackb: The reason why you don't see many "studies" done on showing that UV causes DNA tumors is that this fact already established and procedural. It's very procedural in the lab setting that you can induce tumors (essentially the result of accumulated mutations) in cell lines using UV radiation, a mutagen. Many of the antioxidants we take (fish oil, lycopene, vitamin e, and bilberry) have bene shown to increase one's resistance to UV damage, giving you SPF protection. Unless you think those antioxidants are doing a bad thing by giving us SPF protection. I really can't see why you don't concede that UV causes damage to the skin....

We're fighting a losing battle. They just won't accept what is already an established fact. It's quite funny really.

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rackb: The reason why you don't see many "studies" done on showing that UV causes DNA tumors is that this fact already established and procedural. It's very procedural in the lab setting that you can induce tumors (essentially the result of accumulated mutations) in cell lines using UV radiation, a mutagen. Many of the antioxidants we take (fish oil, lycopene, vitamin e, and bilberry) have bene shown to increase one's resistance to UV damage, giving you SPF protection. Unless you think those antioxidants are doing a bad thing by giving us SPF protection. I really can't see why you don't concede that UV causes damage to the skin....

I think he realizes that UV rays can cause damage...if you stay in peak sun for hours a day for several years. But for most of us here, assuming we're light skinned, UV rays are damaging. But for someone from Congo, they can withstand the rays much better than we can...though they produce vitamin D at a much slower rate.

BTW, fish oil is NOT an anti-oxidant. It actually will raise peroxidation levels when consumed, but cod liver oil will not. Additionally, how can you explain why the kitavan and ache tribes have no diseases of aging despite spending pretty much all their life outdoors?

We're fighting a losing battle. They just won't accept what is already an established fact. It's quite funny really.

The "studies" don't explain why the incidence of aging diseases like hypertension and diabetes have gone up...despite more sunscreen use and more avoidance of the sun. You keep ignoring what mother nature gave us and I'll continue to nourish from it.

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rackb: The reason why you don't see many "studies" done on showing that UV causes DNA tumors is that this fact already established and procedural. It's very procedural in the lab setting that you can induce tumors (essentially the result of accumulated mutations) in cell lines using UV radiation, a mutagen. Many of the antioxidants we take (fish oil, lycopene, vitamin e, and bilberry) have bene shown to increase one's resistance to UV damage, giving you SPF protection. Unless you think those antioxidants are doing a bad thing by giving us SPF protection. I really can't see why you don't concede that UV causes damage to the skin....

I think he realizes that UV rays can cause damage...if you stay in peak sun for hours a day for several years. But for most of us here, assuming we're light skinned, UV rays are damaging. But for someone from Congo, they can withstand the rays much better than we can...though they produce vitamin D at a much slower rate.

BTW, fish oil is NOT an anti-oxidant. It actually will raise peroxidation levels when consumed, but cod liver oil will not. Additionally, how can you explain why the kitavan and ache tribes have no diseases of aging despite spending pretty much all their life outdoors?

We're fighting a losing battle. They just won't accept what is already an established fact. It's quite funny really.

The "studies" don't explain why the incidence of aging diseases like hypertension and diabetes have gone up...despite more sunscreen use and more avoidance of the sun. You keep ignoring what mother nature gave us and I'll continue to nourish from it.

yay for mother nature!=) Anyways, I never said the sun caused aging of the body(like diabetes and hypertension) we are talking about SKIN here. But again, yay for mother nature! Go for it!

Dingo: maybe you should watch this video, its quite sad. I feel like youa re making light of something that causes tragedies for some people

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So they have found that melnoma mortality is greater for people near the equator. There are also studies that show that melanoma rate is higher in TExas than minnesotta, where there is not nearly as much sun. Howerver, they also found that indoor people have greater chances of melanoma than outdoor people. So the relationship isn't exactly simple, I'll admit. However, you must consider what type of skin the tribal people had? People who have fair skin with freckles have been shown to have increased risks for melanoma. Therefore, genetics also play a role. The tribal people...what is their skin type? Perhaps sun is acceptable for some people, but for others, even minimal sunexposure is a call for disaster! It's hard to generalize, but some facts remain: UV can induce many mutations in the skin and probably even more so in peoplle who are susceptible.

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Sunscreens: The Importance of UVA Protection

Disclosures

M. Shane Chapman, MD

Introduction

It is now known that ultraviolet-A radiation (UVA) plays an important role not only in skin cancer but also in cutaneous aging, immunosuppression, polymorphous light eruption, and urticaria. At a focus session on sunscreens at the 60th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology, Robert Bissonette, MD, MSc, FRCPC,[1] Assistant Professor of Dermatology, University of Montreal, Quebec, Canada, concentrated on the evolving importance of UVA protection in sunscreens.

Ultraviolet Light

The solar radiation that penetrates the earth's atmosphere, thus hitting the earth's surface and our skin, is generally divided into ultraviolet light A (UVA) and ultraviolet light B (UVB) radiation. UVB encompasses the solar spectrum from 290 to 320 nanometers (nm), and UVA encompasses the spectrum from 320 to 400 nm. Thus, UVA radiation includes longer wavelengths, allowing deeper penetration into the skin. Luckily, UVC does not reach the earth's atmosphere. It was once thought that UVB rays were the most important contributors to wrinkling, skin disease, and skin cancer, but more recent studies have shown that UVA radiation is equally or even more important in the development of solar damage and skin diseases, such as lupus erythematosus and melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers.

Photodermatoses and Their Relationship to UVA

UVA has been well documented to have multiple effects on human skin, both therapeutic and detrimental. UVA induces polymorphous light eruption (PMLE) in most patients,[2] although it has been shown to reduce PMLE in others.[3] Solar urticaria can be induced by UVA and UVB.[4] Cutaneous lupus erythematosus is also exacerbated by UVA light. These are all cutaneous inflammatory diseases of unknown origin. Skin cancer and the overall health of the skin is another issue.

Skin Cancer and UVA

In the past, UVA was thought to be less important than UVB in the generation of sun damage and skin cancer, but it is now known that UVA does indeed induce mutations in DNA, leading to skin cancers in both animal and human skin.[5] It has also been shown that UVA can induce p53 mutations which can accumulate in human skin. These mutations can be reduced by using UVA sunscreens, thus demonstrating that there is less p53 accumulation with better UVA protection.[6]

rest of article is here, but you need to sign in (free) to see it

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/431185

not the whole article but something-

http://tinyurl.com/432em7

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yeah, but they also mention at the bottom that you can get sufficient vitamin D from supplementation. Anyways, Vitamin D is very important to the body- but the issue we are debating here is the relationship between sun exposure and premature aging, which Jellybean refuses to acknowledge.

Anyways- even if you apply sunscreen daily, you are never going to cover everything completely, like the ears behind the neck, etc. You really don't need much to get the vitamin D

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1712356...pt=AbstractPlus <-- Sunlight (via vitamin d) is vital for detoxification.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2536537?dopt=AbstractPlus <-- Psoriasis treatment

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8541004?dopt=AbstractPlus <-- Hypertension

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1604254...pt=AbstractPlus <-- Reversal of age related illness in the hippocampus (brain)

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1711728...pt=AbstractPlus <- Cardiovascular disease

http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/331/7508/109-a <-- Chronic back pain

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7555599?dopt=AbstractPlus <-- Type II diabetes

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8325381 <-- Antioxidant

I can go on much longer than you can. You present evidence to the contrary and you say you will wear sunscreen for every second of sun exposure. I will expose my body to the sun the way our ancestors did. The fact that our ancestors had such access to this vital nutrient tells me that if they lacked it (remember, vitamin D supplements did NOT exist back then) we would never be alive. Thus sunlight > sunlight + sunblock.

I think people assume that the only thing sunlight is good for is vitamin D. Sunlight also stimulates MSH...try getting that in a bottle.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1712356...pt=AbstractPlus <-- Sunlight (via vitamin d) is vital for detoxification.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2536537?dopt=AbstractPlus <-- Psoriasis treatment

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8541004?dopt=AbstractPlus <-- Hypertension

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1604254...pt=AbstractPlus <-- Reversal of age related illness in the hippocampus (brain)

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1711728...pt=AbstractPlus <- Cardiovascular disease

http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/331/7508/109-a <-- Chronic back pain

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7555599?dopt=AbstractPlus <-- Type II diabetes

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8325381 <-- Antioxidant

I can go on much longer than you can. You present evidence to the contrary and you say you will wear sunscreen for every second of sun exposure. I will expose my body to the sun the way our ancestors did. The fact that our ancestors had such access to this vital nutrient tells me that if they lacked it (remember, vitamin D supplements did NOT exist back then) we would never be alive. Thus sunlight > sunlight + sunblock.

I think people assume that the only thing sunlight is good for is vitamin D. Sunlight also stimulates MSH...try getting that in a bottle.

Jellybean- weren't you just arguing with me that the sun does not cause SKIN aging? Have you just completely changed tactics or what. Im not arguing with you about how a little daily sunlight affect our overall health, Im talking about SKIN here. Don't change the subject.

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Jellybean- weren't you just arguing with me that the sun does not cause SKIN aging? Have you just completely changed tactics or what. Im not arguing with you about how a little daily sunlight affect our overall health, Im talking about SKIN here. Don't change the subject.

I didn't change the subject. I'm talking about skin too. It's your skin that helps produce vitamin D3. You were the one who went off on a tangent about "let's wait 10 years and see who ages more." Surely you remember that statement.

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Jellybean- weren't you just arguing with me that the sun does not cause SKIN aging? Have you just completely changed tactics or what. Im not arguing with you about how a little daily sunlight affect our overall health, Im talking about SKIN here. Don't change the subject.

I didn't change the subject. I'm talking about skin too. It's your skin that helps produce vitamin D3. You were the one who went off on a tangent about "let's wait 10 years and see who ages more." Surely you remember that statement.

Yeah....what does that have to do with anything? We are talking about skin aging, according to you the sun does not cause "skin aging."

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Instead of starting a new post, I've decided to simply add here since this is where I found all this wonderful information.

________________________________

I think I shall really benefit from this. I'd like to take in roughly as much as the body would naturally produce in ideal conditions from the sun.

Though the original poster claims hes found "Your body, assuming you're light skinned, can make ~20,000 IU of vitamin D in a matter of minutes (about 20-35 min) in noontime sun with minimal clothing during summer."

That is a very high number. As well I'm worried since its a fat soluble vitamin and what not. (mostly the reason I've been hesitant to take it at all, I'm not sure how much to take) I currently take maybe 800IU if that.

As well I've read that iron and other vitamins can block vitamin D absorption. Should I not take it with my multivitamin? Should I take it with or without food?

Sorry for all these random questions, yes I have more research to do yet I want to see what the people here think first.

___________________

I should also mention my Mom and my Uncle are both tested as vitamin D deficient, so perhaps this can solve a variety of things I go through. I've asked 2 doctors now, and they just say "oo well vitamin deficiencies are so rare, were not going to test you for that" (though I didn't mention it may run in my family)

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Instead of starting a new post, I've decided to simply add here since this is where I found all this wonderful information.

________________________________

I think I shall really benefit from this. I'd like to take in roughly as much as the body would naturally produce in ideal conditions from the sun.

Though the original poster claims hes found "Your body, assuming you're light skinned, can make ~20,000 IU of vitamin D in a matter of minutes (about 20-35 min) in noontime sun with minimal clothing during summer."

That is a very high number. As well I'm worried since its a fat soluble vitamin and what not. (mostly the reason I've been hesitant to take it at all, I'm not sure how much to take) I currently take maybe 800IU if that.

As well I've read that iron and other vitamins can block vitamin D absorption. Should I not take it with my multivitamin? Should I take it with or without food?

Sorry for all these random questions, yes I have more research to do yet I want to see what the people here think first.

___________________

I should also mention my Mom and my Uncle are both tested as vitamin D deficient, so perhaps this can solve a variety of things I go through. I've asked 2 doctors now, and they just say "oo well vitamin deficiencies are so rare, were not going to test you for that" (though I didn't mention it may run in my family)

haha!! rare doesnt mean impossible!! and how was this knowledge of RARENESS concluded anyway?? how do they know the vitamin status of every living person on the planet?? right?? they simply cannot, they approximate somehow. Its even impossible to know the exact status of any one vitamin reserves due to the nature of minerals, you store magnesium, phosphorus, calcium,etc in bone and tissue, and many in tissues and 1-2 % is in your blood. serum levels are just a glimpse of your mineral status, and many times indicate deficienys in other minerals that are reflected in the mineral you are checking for. For example, you find out your calcium levels seems low, so you think you need more calcium right?? wrong, this could indicate low vitamin d which is involved in absorbtion of calcium, or even low magnesium. they are dependant on eachother as a harmonious system. Optimum vitamin reserves may be the first cause of many bodily effects in your body.

This thread is a keeper for sure, dingo jelly bean has done some excellent work here, ill have to admit i saw this thread a while back i havent tried upping my vit d yet, but now i will up them to 20,000 iu and see what happens.

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Hey all - certainly the first few pages here were really good to read and lots of views here have been nicely expressed.

Well, I've just ordered a big ol' tub of Vitamin D3 and will begin my journey. Each capsule is 5,000 IU. I was recently told I look gaunt... actually I'm just a pretty pale kinda 29yr/old guy.

As with a lot of others my work involves not being out and about during the day for the sunshine. So, in the next couple of days I'll begin taking one a day and will see how things progress. I'm hoping my acne will finally start to subside and my energy levels will be boosted by this. I'm also hoping I might get some colour back in my skin if there's some Vitamin D3 in me!

I'll report back soon... any thoughts as to when I might start even noticing any changes? Joe

Edited by Pepi
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People get skin cancers, because first they are vitamin D deficient for several months and then suddenly go out and lay 5 hours a day under the sun trying to get tanned for several weeks wearing some sunscreen that blocks the forming of vitamin D which would protect the skin. That's unnatural and fucking retarded.

Edited by Rawhide
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People get skin cancers, because first they are vitamin D deficient for several months and then suddenly go out and lay 5 hours a day under the sun trying to get tanned for several weeks wearing some sunscreen that blocks the forming of vitamin D which would protect the skin. That's unnatural and fucking retarded.

Exactly!!! Thanks for posting that.

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There's a good article along with discussion from readers as to how much Vitamin D you should take.

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles...-the-Truth.aspx

Everyone should get their Vitamin D levels checked though to see where they're at and then try to stay at the recommended optimum serum levels. If everyone in America did that they say that cancer rates would likely drop drastically.

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Hey all - certainly the first few pages here were really good to read and lots of views here have been nicely expressed.

Well, I've just ordered a big ol' tub of Vitamin D3 and will begin my journey. Each capsule is 5,000 IU. I was recently told I look gaunt... actually I'm just a pretty pale kinda 29yr/old guy.

As with a lot of others my work involves not being out and about during the day for the sunshine. So, in the next couple of days I'll begin taking one a day and will see how things progress. I'm hoping my acne will finally start to subside and my energy levels will be boosted by this. I'm also hoping I might get some colour back in my skin if there's some Vitamin D3 in me!

I'll report back soon... any thoughts as to when I might start even noticing any changes? Joe

OK... so a progress report after 6 days. My skin is less greasy/oily, I've had NO new outbreaks or any new spots(!!!), my face colour is becoming more even (no red areas) and in general my spots seem to be drying up and disappearing!! I'm seriously amazed and excited and can't recommend this enough. I'm on 5000IU per day which has had no side-effects as yet. I'll report back again sometime soon if anything else changes/gets worse/better etc. Thought I'd fill you in! Joe

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I've been taking up to 20 000 IU / day for about 2 weeks but no positive results on face altough my bacne is pretty much on control... So I don't think this is the cure for me, but let's see if it just takes a while longer. Anyway I'm gonna start DIM + Saw palmetto soon since it helped very well last time (I guess it's hormonal acne then). I'm gonna keep taking D 5000 IU / day anyways for the health benefits.

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