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gpb

Getting rid of cystic acne - long term

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I used to get cystic acne, more on my back then my face.

My doctor suggested putting a small amount of polysporin/neosporin in each nostril every day. I thought she was crazy, but it turns out that cystic acne (and boils) are caused by a bacteria called Staphylococcus aureus (see the CDC's website: http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dhqp/ar_mrsa_ca_public.html#1).

This type of bacteria can chill out in your nostrils, so even taking taking antiobiotics won't necessarily get rid of it. Using a topical, broad spectrum antibacterial gel/cream like neosporin will.

What I did:

* every day after my shower, I use a double-ended q-tip to place a tiny bit of polysporin on each end (about 1/4 of a pencil eraser).

* I use one end of the q-tip for each nostril and gently smear it around the inside on the nostril. You do not need to go deep and it should not be uncomfortable at all!

* Keep doing this for about a month and you will see results. My existing cystic acne did not disappear overnight, but gradually got better. Most importantly, I didn't get any new ones.

* If you think you are getting cystic acne or boils again, repeat. In my experience, they have never been as bad as they were before I started this, and they go away much more quickly than before.

I suggest using the gel kind, rather than the cream kind of poly/neosporin, but either is fine. Some people notice a smell from the polyneosporin, but trust me, it's worth it.

If you try to pick or squeeze these, they can get much worse. Sometimes using a hot compress can help to bring the pus out gently which might be helpful if it's really painful. Sorry to be gross, but as anyone who has had these knows, they are disgusting!

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That is interesting. So the bacteria that causes cysts resides in the nose? But how does the bacteria in your nose travel to the areas on your face?

I only get cysts on the jawline on the right side of my place, no where else. Right now I have one huge cyst, 1 smaller cyst, and 3 nodules there. They are hormonal.

Would this help with regular pimples too? Because I get stubborn whiteheads on my chin all the time.

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That is interesting. So the bacteria that causes cysts resides in the nose? But how does the bacteria in your nose travel to the areas on your face?

I only get cysts on the jawline on the right side of my place, no where else. Right now I have one huge cyst, 1 smaller cyst, and 3 nodules there. They are hormonal.

Would this help with regular pimples too? Because I get stubborn whiteheads on my chin all the time.

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No, the bacteria does not travel via your bloodstream. That is sepsis, and that's something that's most often treated in the hospital. You don't know how many times the typical person touches the face inadvertently, or the nose, and then touches something else. That is how the bacteria spreads, not via the bloodstream. Or sneezing. Sneeze into a SHOULDER, not your hands. That way you won't contaminate anything while you're on the way to the bathroom to blow your nose. Unless you have a habit of rubbing your shoulders onto people or doorknobs you pass.

I still am amazed at the number of people who don't wash their hands after going to the bathroom or blowing their noses. It's disgusting.

The nares are a common reservoir of infection for all sorts of lovely little bacteria. So is your skin itself. Most of the time all of those bacteria do not cause any type of infection whatsoever but in some cases (like those prone to acne, who may have abnormal allergic and inflammatory responses to typical bacteria such as p. acnes or staph aureus) the normal bacterial reservoirs can cause infection.

It certainly won't hurt to put a TINY amount of polysporin in the nares. The nares are also the most common site of colonization for methicillin resistant staph aureus. BUT that's something that would have to be confirmed or denied by a culture and sensitivity test and there would need to be empiric signs of infection somewhere in the body for a doctor to be able to justify such a test to an insurance company or even to him/herself.

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No, the bacteria does not travel via your bloodstream. That is sepsis, and that's something that's most often treated in the hospital. You don't know how many times the typical person touches the face inadvertently, or the nose, and then touches something else. That is how the bacteria spreads, not via the bloodstream. Or sneezing. Sneeze into a SHOULDER, not your hands. That way you won't contaminate anything while you're on the way to the bathroom to blow your nose. Unless you have a habit of rubbing your shoulders onto people or doorknobs you pass.

I still am amazed at the number of people who don't wash their hands after going to the bathroom or blowing their noses. It's disgusting.

The nares are a common reservoir of infection for all sorts of lovely little bacteria. So is your skin itself. Most of the time all of those bacteria do not cause any type of infection whatsoever but in some cases (like those prone to acne, who may have abnormal allergic and inflammatory responses to typical bacteria such as p. acnes or staph aureus) the normal bacterial reservoirs can cause infection.

It certainly won't hurt to put a TINY amount of polysporin in the nares. The nares are also the most common site of colonization for methicillin resistant staph aureus. BUT that's something that would have to be confirmed or denied by a culture and sensitivity test and there would need to be empiric signs of infection somewhere in the body for a doctor to be able to justify such a test to an insurance company or even to him/herself.

..boring....

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Well this is something...

Now how about this: I saw a documentary on ABC television here in Australia I think it was ABC Anyway. It was about a skin condition, considered an infectious thing, since people used to "catch" it along with everybody else around them.

After long studies, and the "self-expirementing" scientists shoving the faeces and blood clots of the supposedly infected people into their mouth and up their noses, they did not end up with the disease. It was eventually isolated, that the skin disease was due to only one thing, a lack of folate in the diet apparently (as far as I remember it, it was just one vitamin type thing anyway that was lacking)

In my opinion you are far more likely to be looking at an immune system thing if anything here. Funnily enough though hospital "staph" and pimples, I do agree with the link that these two things seem to share. Killing the bacteria up your nose might help...sure, but a proper immune system should be taking care of these things for you, you would hope. http://www.sciencealert.com.au/news/20071709-16336-2.html

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guys,

I do not know if you read this but gpb, did you get rid of the acne after all?

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