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Rethinking Cholesterol

On the Wheat - Heart attack coorelation, you have to consider, wheat is not eaten like most other grains. With most grains, they're boiled, and eaten whole once soft enough. Wheat is very bitter when cooked this way. So when wheat is eaten, it's usually in some processed refined form. The study makes no mention of the refined sugar levels in those diets. Wheat products frequently go hand-in-hand with refined sugars, and refined carbs alone are always worse than whole grains.

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Since there was so much talk about wheat, I thought I'd see how the other gluten containing grains fared:

Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Dec;84(6):1385-92. Links

Interaction between cholesterol and glucose metabolism during dietary carbohydrate

modification in subjects with the metabolic syndrome.Hallikainen M, Toppinen L, Mykkänen H, Agren JJ, Laaksonen DE, Miettinen TA, Niskanen L, Poutanen KS, Gylling H.

Department of Clinical Nutrition, University of Kuopio, Kuopio, Finland. [email protected]

BACKGROUND: Carbohydrate modification based on rye bread and pasta enhances early insulin secretion in subjects with the metabolic syndrome.

OBJECTIVE: Because the actions of insulin and cholesterol metabolism are interrelated, the question is raised of whether it is possible to altercholesterol metabolism by means of dietary carbohydrate modification.

DESIGN: We investigated the 12-wk effects of dietary carbohydrate modification on cholesterol synthesis and absorption by measuring the ratios of surrogate markers of precursor (cholestenol, desmosterol, and lathosterol) and absorption (cholestanol and plant sterols) sterols to cholesterol and their association to glucose metabolism in 74 subjects with the metabolic syndrome. The subjects were randomly assigned to diets with rye bread and pasta (RPa) or oat, wheat bread, and potato (OWPo) as the main carbohydrate source (34% and 37% of energy intake, respectively).

RESULTS: During the study, serum cholesterol concentrations remained unchanged. Cholesterol synthesis was lower (6-10% for cholestenol and lathosterol; P < 0.05) and absorption higher (9%; P < 0.05 for sitosterol) with the OWPo diet than at baseline. With the RPa diet, cholesterol absorption was lower and synthesis higher than with the OWPo diet. The increment in the glucose area under the curve with the RPa diet was positively related to baseline cholesterol synthesis (eg, lathosterol; r = 0.480, P < 0.05) and negatively to absorption (for cholestanol; r = -0.520, P < 0.05). In the combined group, the changes in the cholestanol ratio and the insulinogenic index were interrelated (r = -0.464, P < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS: Carbohydrate modifications had dissimilar effects on cholesterol metabolism. Consumption of RPa, as compared with OWPo, may be clinically more favorable because it seems to inhibit the absorption of cholesterol, a factor crucial in the development of arterial atherosclerosis . http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/full/84/6/1385 (Full Text)

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I've read that the so-called rise in blood cholesterol from eating foods high in saturated fat were actually from foods that contained hydrogenated fats, i.e. trans fats.

In other words, unhydrogenated saturated fat, like from coconut oil or dairy, has never been tested for how it affects cholesterol--it's only been tested in the unhealthier, hydrogenated form.

Any truth to this?

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I've read that the so-called rise in blood cholesterol from eating foods high in saturated fat were actually from foods that contained hydrogenated fats, i.e. trans fats.

In other words, unhydrogenated saturated fat, like from coconut oil or dairy, has never been tested for how it affects cholesterol--it's only been tested in the unhealthier, hydrogenated form.

Any truth to this?

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Thanks for all the studies, Sweet Jade!

Have you ever seen one that conclusively proves animal saturated fat is really that bad for us? Most of the studies that I've seen aren't done very well because they leave other variables wide open.

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hmmm...looking at my studies just makes me realize how we are all different. I truly have wheat sensitivity. Since quitting wheat, I no longer have allergies, bloating, or comedones.

One of my best friends, on the other hand, carries a bag of wheat bread with him, wherever he goes. On average, he eats 25-30 slices of wheat bread everyday. His skin is perfect and his health is great...

If only diet could be a one-size-fit-all kind of thing....

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hmmm...looking at my studies just makes me realize how we are all different. I truly have wheat sensitivity. Since quitting wheat, I no longer have allergies, bloating, or comedones.

One of my best friends, on the other hand, carries a bag of wheat bread with him, wherever he goes. On average, he eats 25-30 slices of wheat bread everyday. His skin is perfect and his health is great...

If only diet could be a one-size-fit-all kind of thing....

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Hello, I have been reading posts at Acne.org for several years now and thanks to this amazing site and the information I found here I was able to significantly improve my condition. I would like to share my experience and my findings.

I am convinced that my acne was a way for my body to get rid of triglycerides. I found this quite by chance when I started taking (on a trial and error basis) vitamin C (several grams per day). I understood that vitamin C is a very powerful agent for reducing triglycerides. Then I continued by adding magnesium, vitamin D and calcium, vitamin b-complex and L-carnitine.

After researching even further I learned that these vitamins activate a key enzyme that clears triglycerides from the bloodstream. This enzyme is called lipoprotein lipase.

Fish oil is also known for stimulating lipoprotein lipase.

I hope that this will be helpful for you too.

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