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Adult acne and iodine

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I found this interesting case report on pubmed that describes the symptoms of iodine induced acne in adults.

Acneform eruption with iodized salt.

1998

Case report:

A 28-year-old man presented with acneform eruption over the face and upper trunk which had been present for the past 4 years. The majority of the lesions were inflammatory, consisting of superficial papules and pustules with a few deep, nodular lesions. In places, post-inflammatory hyper-pigmentation and a few atrophic macular scars were seen. The patient had failed to respond to multiple courses of antibiotics, topical erythromycin, tretinoin, and benzoyl peroxide. A detailed history was taken to determine the offending agent, including "hidden iodides" in cough mixtures, expectorant, vitamins, etc. We advised the patient to stop taking iodized salt in the diet and to continue applying topical erythromycin 4% cream. After 4 weeks, the patient showed marked improvement with the the regression of old lesions and no appearance of new lesions. There was complete disappearance of inflammatory lesions at 6 weeks of follow-up. In order to confirm iodized salt as the offending agent, the patient was challenged with iodized salt (dietary supplementation) at 12 weeks of follow-up. The patient presented with new inflammatory papules and pustular lesions over the face after 3 weeks, which improved when iodized salt was stopped.

Comments:

1. Prolonged administration of a small dose of iodide may provoke an acneform eruption similar to that observed with steroid. In addition, the following may occur: urticaria, papulopustular lesions, nodules, anthracoid lesions, and clear or hemorrhagic bullae on the face, forearms, neck, and flexures.

2. It is debatable how much iodized salt should be ingested to cause this type of acne. In India, the level of iodization is fixed: 30 ppm of iodine at production point and no less than 15 ppm of iodine at consumer level.

3. Over the past 10 years, patients with post-adolescent acne have represented an increasingly important population of acne sufferers.

4. Trivial factors, such as iodized salt, should be taken into consideration in evaluating post-adolescent or mature acne.

Davinder Parsad,. MD. R. Saini,. DNB. Dehradun, India.

From http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9646145

If you have acneiform symptoms like this, I think it would be well worth trying a low iodine diet for a test duration.

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I found this interesting case report on pubmed that describes the symptoms of iodine induced acne in adults.

If you have acneiform symptoms like this, I think it would be well worth trying a low iodine diet for a test duration.

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You die in a very very very very unpleasant manner if you dont get enough iodine. Keep that in mind.

That said, there are plenty of iodine free salts, and they are all vastly superior to that shit that gets sold as table salt. It's a rare case to see a modern diet in a developed nation have iodine deficiency. I don't use table salt at all (kosher flake salt is my "cheap" salt, also there are a couple "special purposes" salts I use), and have no iodine deficiency, due to it's availability from certain produce, seafood, and prepared foods.

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You die in a very very very very unpleasant manner if you dont get enough iodine. Keep that in mind.

That said, there are plenty of iodine free salts, and they are all vastly superior to that shit that gets sold as table salt. It's a rare case to see a modern diet in a developed nation have iodine deficiency. I don't use table salt at all (kosher flake salt is my "cheap" salt, also there are a couple "special purposes" salts I use), and have no iodine deficiency, due to it's availability from certain produce, seafood, and prepared foods.

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Please be careful, Not intaking enough iodine can cause your hair to fall out, hypothyroidism and a variety of other diseases that last for a lifetime and are fatal.

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For most people eating a western type of diet, you probably get more iodine than you realize. You definitely need a certain level to keep your thyroid functioning properly, but ingesting too much can also have a negative impact on your thyroid functioning and cause it to respond in a similar way as it does when you are iodine deficient. You only need a tiny amount of iodine for your thyroid to function properly. Here is a list of foods with high to moderate amounts (ordered by parts-per-million iodine content) of iodine. Keep in mind that lots of processed foods and salty snacks contain iodized salt, so those may be another source of iodine in your daily diet. Also if your diet contains a moderate amount of seafood, you are probably getting a good amount of iodine.

1. Kelp (1020 PPM of iodine)

2. Beef liver (325 ppm)

3. Asparagus (169 ppm)

4. Turkey (132 ppm)

5. Iodized salt 1/4 tsp (100 ppm)

6. Broccoli (90 ppm)

7. Cod (87 ppm)

8. Tortilla chips with salt (80 ppm)

9. Seasoned salt (40 ppm)

10. Potato chips with salt (40 ppm)

11. Squid (39 ppm)

12. Crab (33 ppm)

13. Sun Evaporated Salt (30 ppm)

14. Cheddar Cheese Spread (27 ppm)

15. Butter (26 ppm)

16. Uniodized salt (19 ppm)

17. Mozzarella Cheese (13 ppm)

18. Milk (11 ppm)

-Also on this list are protein shakes and bars, which vary in amount of iodine - some contain no iodine, while others contain very high levels, so you need to check the ones you are using.

For me, it makes the most sense to avoid the items on the list that are either not healthy (salty snacks, chips, butter, crab) or extremely high in iodine (kelp) and to keep low to moderate amounts of the healthier foods that are moderately high in iodine (fish, asparagus, broccoli). I also only eat small amounts of dairy, but haven't cut it out 100%.

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Iodine is extremely important for health, and iodine deficiency is implicated as a major factor in various cancers and other serious health problems. It's also needed for skin health.

Most US citizens barely get even a fraction of what the body requires each day, plus toxic flouride, chlorine and bromine (which is baked into bread products instead of iodine now) compete with iodine and make the situation even more dire. People living in the Great Lakes region tend to have the worst deficiencies.

Here is a thread that lists all the links I would have posted:

Iodine, It's Role and Why It's Important

The best salt product IMO is Real Salt. You can find it at most health food stores and some grocery stores. It is a natural salt with all the trace minerals.

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