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alternativista

Inflammation a cause of impaired glucose metabolism?

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People didn't seem to notice this post in one of the Insulin Resistance diet threads. OF course, it's about something that's been said before, but it just caught my attention.

Anyway, the above mentioned post is about the theory that Chronic Inflammatory Syndrome is the root cause of diabetes, acne, etc. And we know obesity, especially visceral fat, increases inflammation.

Diets involving the avoidance of high GI foods or high fat foods help because glucose metabolism is impaired. Avoidance of the causes of the inflammation: meals high in inflammatory foods, food intolerances, other allergens, etc., can restore glucose metabolism.

There are plenty of links to support. I plan to look into this further. I find it hard to believe so many people need to avoid sugars so much they can't eat fruit. And I've been following an anti-inflammatory diet, but I'd been considering inflammation a factor, not the root cause.

See also about Androgens and Histamine connection

Edited by alternativista

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valid point, but I feel that some people are way more prone to to insulin resistance than others. This is where genetics may play a big factor. There could be some evolutionary explanation for it. I have recently noticed that carbs are my biggest trigger. I have avoided typical "trigger" foods for a month while remaining high carb with no results. I am pretty sure I don't have candida or any other sort of overgrowth either. I have been taking probiotic supplements and fermented foods for many months, along with bitter herbs to kill off any potential candida. I never had a die off, and never saw any improvement. I have eaten "healthy" and exercised regularly for years with minimal benefit.

The most effective regimen thus far has just been to stay away from anything carb laden, fish oil and exercise. I have recently added brewers yeast, chromium and just added cinnamon to see if that helps at all.

I think that you are right that most people have a trigger, be it a food allergen or intestinal dysbiosis. But judging from my personal experience thus far, I have found that I am insulin resistant, with no obvious "root cause."

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no insulin resistance is caused by ingesting too much energy at one time, not really what you eat. Since the human body is suited to consume many small meals throughout the day, eating one or 2 meals a day will elevate your chances of this problem greatly

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just today i was introduced to the possibility that adrenaline and other stress hormones can impair insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism, and that chronic stress may be the underlying cause of all the mentioned diseases.

whether this is true or not ill have to research it a bit.

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just today i was introduced to the possibility that adrenaline and other stress hormones can impair insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism, and that chronic stress may be the underlying cause of all the mentioned diseases.

whether this is true or not ill have to research it a bit.

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I still eat some fruit for carbs, but I limit them and combine them with other stuff. For instance, I have some eggs and 1 big date for breakfast. I won't drink juices or eat a banana on an empty stomach. I will have a small amount of dried fruit on my salad. I still haven't determined the cause of my insulin resistance, but too much sugar is definitely a trigger for me.

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Conditions and diseases with chronic inflammation as a factor/cause.

A bunch of significant paragraphs copied from this article here.

http://www.lef.org/protocols/prtcl-146.shtml

Diseases Related To Chronic Inflammation

Disease - Mechanism

Allergy - Inflammatory cytokines induce autoimmune reactions

Alzheimer's - Chronic inflammation destroys brain cells

Anemia -Inflammatory cytokines attack erythropoietin production

Aortic valve stenosis -Chronic inflammation damages heart valves

Arthritis -Inflammatory cytokines destroy joint cartilage and synovial fluid

Cancer -Chronic inflammation causes many cancers

Congestive heart failure -Chronic inflammation contributes to heart muscle wasting

Fibromyalgia -Inflammatory cytokines are elevated

Fibrosis -Inflammatory cytokines attack traumatized tissue

Heart attack Chronic inflammation contributes to coronary atherosclerosis

Kidney failure -Inflammatory cytokines restrict circulation and damage nephrons

Lupus -Inflammatory cytokines induce an autoimmune attack

Pancreatitis -Inflammatory cytokines induce pancreatic cell injury

Psoriasis -Inflammatory cytokines induce dermatitis

Stroke -Chronic inflammation promoted thromboembolic events

Surgical complications -Inflammatory cytokines prevent healing

A growing consensus among scientists is that common disorders such as atherosclerosis, colon cancer, and Alzheimer's disease are all caused in part by a chronic inflammatory syndrome.

Chronic inflammation is also involved in diseases as diverse as atherosclerosis, cancer, heart valve dysfunction, obesity, diabetes, congestive heart failure, digestive system diseases, and Alzheimer's disease (Brouqui et al. 1994; Devaux et al. 1997; De Keyser et al. 1998).

It is not just age-related disease that has been linked to chronic inflammation. A growing body of evidence points to a chronic inflammatory state as an underlying cause of kidney failure, asthma, pancreatitis, lupus, certain skin diseases, and other conditions.

A critical inflammatory marker is C-reactive protein. This marker indicates an increased risk for destabilized atherosclerotic plaque and abnormal arterial clotting. When arterial plaque becomes destabilized, it can burst open and block the flow of blood through a coronary artery, resulting in an acute heart attack.

Elevated C-Reactive Protein and Interleukin-6 Predict Type II Diabetes

Pro-inflammatory cytokines are an underlying cause of systemic inflammation that is indicated by excess C-reactive protein in the blood.

From Abstract here:

Obesity-induced chronic inflammation is a key component in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and the Metabolic syndrome. In this review, we focus on the interconnection between obesity, inflammation and insulin resistance. Pro-inflammatory cytokines can cause insulin resistance in adipose tissue, skeletal muscle and liver by inhibiting insulin signal transduction. The sources of cytokines in insulin resistant states are the insulin target tissue themselves, primarily fat and liver, but to a larger extent the activated tissue resident macrophages. While the initiating factors of this inflammatory response remain to be fully determined, chronic inflammation in these tissues could cause localized insulin resistance via autocrine/paracrine cytokine signaling and systemic insulin resistance via endocrine cytokine signaling all of which contribute to the abnormal metabolic state.

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More about how inflammation leads to diabetes from here.

It's long been known that type 1 diabetes is linked to inflammation -- the body's immune system attacks the cells that make insulin. Now, new research is suggesting that type 2 diabetes, the kind that generally sets in in adulthood, often begins with insulin resistance, in which cells stop responding properly to insulin. Doctors now know that during chronic inflammation, one of the chemicals released is TNF, or tumor necrosis factor, which makes cells more resistant to insulin.

""No one would have thought these things were related," but they are, said Dr. Walter Willett, chairman of the department of nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health. The TNF connection also helps explain why obesity, particularly abdominal obesity, leads to diabetes. "Fat cells used to be thought of as storage depots for energy, as metabolically inactive," said Libby. "Now we know that fat cells are little hotbeds of inflammation. Excess fat in the belly is a great source of inflammation."

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This journal article doesn't require a subscription to read in it's entirety.

http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlere...35842#id2706671

Dated January 2008, it states that a number of studies done in the past year have indicated that chronic inflammation is critically involved in the development of diabetes.

And further studies are underway to determine if anti-inflammatory strategies in humans are able to revert IR.

Interestingly, it mentions the glucose-lowering effects of salicylates. Salicylates are of course in aspirin and many of our acne topicals, but also in a lot of foods that some people take for acne such as spearmint and peppermint. They are also high in many of the most nutritious foods like Broccoli, spinach, and berries, spices and tea. But many people are sensitive to them with symptoms including headaches and rhinosinusitus, which describes me.

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This journal article doesn't require a subscription to read in it's entirety.

http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlere...35842#id2706671

Dated January 2008, it states that a number of studies done in the past year have indicated that chronic inflammation is critically involved in the development of diabetes.

And further studies are underway to determine if anti-inflammatory strategies in humans are able to revert IR.

Interestingly, it mentions the glucose-lowering effects of salicylates. Salicylates are of course in aspirin and many of our acne topicals, but also in a lot of foods that some people take for acne such as spearmint and peppermint. They are also high in many of the most nutritious foods like Broccoli, spinach, and berries, spices and tea. But many people are sensitive to them with symptoms including headaches and rhinosinusitus, which describes me.

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So I guess, the most common anti-inflammatory supplements are: ???

Off the top of my head,

Omega 3 EFAs, Green tea, vitamin C, beta carotene, sulfurs like MSM, NAC, Taurine, tumeric, anything that's an antioxident...

boswellic acids

low dose doxycycline (20mg/2x a day)

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just today i was introduced to the possibility that adrenaline and other stress hormones can impair insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism, and that chronic stress may be the underlying cause of all the mentioned diseases.

whether this is true or not ill have to research it a bit.

Yes, this is why they've recently begun saying sleep is just as much a factor as obesity/food and exercise.

Edit to add found info from http://www.lef.org/protocols/prtcl-146a.shtml#deteffsd

The Detrimental Effects of Sleep Deprivation

On June 22, 2002, researchers at the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society held in San Francisco reported that sleep deprivation markedly increases inflammatory cytokines. This finding helps explain why pain flare-up occurs in response to lack of sleep in a variety of disorders. According to the researchers, even modest sleep restriction adversely affects hormone and cytokine levels. In this carefully controlled study, sleep deprivation caused a 40% to 60% average increase in the inflammatory marker IL-6 in men and women, while men alone showed a 20% to 30% increase in TNF-a. Both IL-6 and TNF are potent pro-inflammatory cytokines that induce systemic inflammation (Vgontzas et al. 1999; Vgontzas et al. 2001).

yes yes yes this is all very highly possibly correct, darkness and sunlight cycles and circadian cycles, the pineal gland is directly under the control of light to release melatonin and other hormones at night. Melatonin acts on all the organs in the endocrine system, its the master restorative hormone. im reading a book about it right now

http://www.amazon.com/Melatonin-Miracle-Ag...g/dp/0671534351

and also this on eis great and says most major disease killers in america can be linked to light pollution http://www.amazon.com/Melatonin-Miracle-Ag...g/dp/0671534351

ther ei sno supplement you could ever take that is more powerful then abiding by the rythm of the sun or drug more poweful then you body already makes naturally, buy a great mattress, get rid of stress in your life, and get as much possible darkness at night. Also stay off the computer at night as low levels of magnetic fields mess with your pineal gland(yet to be determined) and also may be a source of possible cancers.

Dont always assume that the answer is so complicated. The is sun cycle is your god, live by it. The answers are in your librarys i suggest everyone get off the internet and start reading.

seriously.

here something to read:

Melatonin: an established antioxidant worthy of use in clinical trials.Korkmaz A, Reiter RJ, Topal T, Manchester LC, Oter S, Tan DX.

Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Gulhane Military Medical Academy, Ankara, Turkey.

Oxidative stress plays a key role in the pathogenesis of aging and many metabolic diseases; therefore, an effective antioxidant therapy would be of great importance in these circumstances. Nutritional, environmental and chemical factors can induce the overproduction of the superoxide anion radical in both the cytosol and mitochondria. This is the first and key event that leads to the activation of pathways involved in the development of several metabolic diseases which are related to oxidative stress. As oxidation of essential molecules continues, it turns to nitro-oxidative stress because of the involvement of nitric oxide in pathogenesis processes. Once peroxynitrite forms, it damages via two distinctive mechanisms; first, it has direct toxic effects leading to lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and DNA damage. The second mechanism involves the induction of several transcription factors leading to cytokine-induced chronic inflammation. Classic antioxidants, including vitamins A, C and E often failed to exhibit beneficial effects in metabolic diseases and aging. Melatonin is a multifunctional indolamine which counteracts virtually all pathophysiologic steps and displays significant beneficial actions against peroxynitrite-induced cellular toxicity. This protection is related to melatonin's antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. Melatonin has the capability of scavenging both oxygen and nitrogen-based reactants including formed from peroxynitrite and blocking transcriptional factors which induce pro-inflammatory cytokines. Accumulating evidence suggests using this non-toxic indolamine either as a sole treatment or in conjunction with other treatments for inhibiting the biohazardous actions of nitro-oxidative stress.

what does the underline portion suggest??? that stress which causes a rise in cortisol, which then inhibits melatonin release, can mess you up and cause diseases. therefore, stress causes many diseases.

Another factor that contributes to melatonin release is total exposure to absolute darkness and strict adherence to your sleep schedule.

No stress, plus lots of good sleep equals disease free and healthy for years to come or until your pineal gland starts pooping out at the age of 45, then you ll need hormone replacement, but lucky for us"for now" melatonin is over the counter. ill be damned if they discover this shit is really powerful and manage to convert it over to prescription, thats capitalism for ya!!!! i suggest investing in some ahead of time.

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