Jump to content
Acne.org
Search In
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

I was wondering is it Ok to use canola oil to cook with? The paleo diet book seems to say it's pretty healthy with a good omega 3 ratio. Any opinions?

I want to roast a turkey breast in the oven :dance: Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Canola oil is great for high-temperature cooking, like sauteing and roasting. And it's a pretty healthy oil, high in omega 3s and all the good stuff.

My favorite oils are olive and avocado oil, since they also have a lot of phytochemicals and other healthy/tasty things. But both of these have a low smoke-point, so they should be used uncooked, or on medium heat or lower. I use canola for any of my high-heat cooking; it retains its beneficial properties and resists free-radical production at higher temps. So you should be good to go! :) (mmm, turkey breast!)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Mike!

I shy away from all hydrogenated vegetable oils so canola oil seems ok IMO.

I'll send you my mailing address in hopes of receiving some homemade turkey :drool: lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I was wondering is it Ok to use canola oil to cook with? The paleo diet book seems to say it's pretty healthy with a good omega 3 ratio. Any opinions?

I want to roast a turkey breast in the oven :dance: Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was under the impression that since it's high in omega-3s, it shouldn't be cooked at high temperatures because of the instability.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why is genetically engineered necessarily bad? Apples and almonds are genetically engineered from their ancestors; the canola is just a strain of rapeseed bred to remove a toxin. This is in the way that modern almonds were bred to remove the toxic levels of cyanide present in their ancestors -- yet almonds in their modern (engineered) form are very healthy.

If there's something I'm missing here, aside from an automatic distrust of engineered plants, let me know!

Re omega 3s: generally, they do break down at high temperatures. But after refining, as canola oil usually is, the oil is much more stable and tolerant to high temperatures. If you're going to cook any oil at a high temperature, it's better to make sure it's refined :) (even though the unrefined is healthier, but sometimes you just can't get away from the high temps)

Re olive oil: if you cook with it, make sure it's at a temperature lower than the olive oil smoke point (about medium heat) so it doesn't undergo the conversion to free radicals.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Why is genetically engineered necessarily bad? Apples and almonds are genetically engineered from their ancestors; the canola is just a strain of rapeseed bred to remove a toxin. This is in the way that modern almonds were bred to remove the toxic levels of cyanide present in their ancestors -- yet almonds in their modern (engineered) form are very healthy.

If there's something I'm missing here, aside from an automatic distrust of engineered plants, let me know!

Re omega 3s: generally, they do break down at high temperatures. But after refining, as canola oil usually is, the oil is much more stable and tolerant to high temperatures. If you're going to cook any oil at a high temperature, it's better to make sure it's refined :) (even though the unrefined is healthier, but sometimes you just can't get away from the high temps)

Re olive oil: if you cook with it, make sure it's at a temperature lower than the olive oil smoke point (about medium heat) so it doesn't undergo the conversion to free radicals.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Why is genetically engineered necessarily bad? Apples and almonds are genetically engineered from their ancestors; the canola is just a strain of rapeseed bred to remove a toxin. This is in the way that modern almonds were bred to remove the toxic levels of cyanide present in their ancestors -- yet almonds in their modern (engineered) form are very healthy.

If there's something I'm missing here, aside from an automatic distrust of engineered plants, let me know!

Re omega 3s: generally, they do break down at high temperatures. But after refining, as canola oil usually is, the oil is much more stable and tolerant to high temperatures. If you're going to cook any oil at a high temperature, it's better to make sure it's refined :) (even though the unrefined is healthier, but sometimes you just can't get away from the high temps)

Re olive oil: if you cook with it, make sure it's at a temperature lower than the olive oil smoke point (about medium heat) so it doesn't undergo the conversion to free radicals.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Breeding and genetically modifying are two different things. Canola oil is bred, not genetically modified. It is a modified form of rapeseed. There are genetically modified forms of Canola oil to make the plant resistant to herbicides. But not all Canola is GM.

Canola has been bred to reduce the amount of the Erucic Acid in rapeseed that makes rapeseed so dangerous. I found a study a while ago that found rats fed rapeseed oil developed wounds in their lungs that wouldn't heal. Canola oil does have lower levels of ericic acid, but it is not eliminated completely, and that's why I stay away from Canola oil. Plus you don't know whether the oil is GM or not most of the time. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canola#Health_effects

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Personalized Advice Quiz - All of Acne.org in just a few minutes


×