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Has anyone here had success using H2O2? I've read that it causes free radical damage, therefore several do not use it, however any peroxide will cause free radical damage, including benzoyl peroxide. That being said, is it a good product to use to kill bacteria?

Thanks,

J

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does benozyl peroxide cause damage? case im using an effective Neutrogena mask/cleanser (2 in 1) thats contains 3.5% of benozyl peroxide. YIKES!!

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Q: Is benzoyl peroxide safe? Does it cause cancer?

A: A quote from "Acne and Rosacea: Third Completely Revised and Updated Edition", 2000:

"Following application to the skin, benzoyl peroxide is rapidly metabolized to benzoic acid, a harmless chemical. Extensive use in human beings has failed to demonstrate absorption. The drug is eminently safe."

A quote from The British Journal of Dermatology, 1990:

"So far no skin malignancies after the clinical use of benzoyl peroxide has been reported. A possible relationship between the use of the compound and the occurrence of malignant melanoma has been looked at in two case-control studies, both with negative results...However, since the average latent period for skin carcinogenesis is of the order of 15-25 years, this requires further follow-up...Thus, the question of carcinogenic potential of benzoyl peroxide is as yet not fully answered, but at the present time it seems likely that this compound is safe to use."

A quote from Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology, 1995:

"Topical benzoyl peroxide has been used in the treatment of acne for over 30 years, with no reports of adverse effects that could be related to skin carcinogenesis. Two case-control epidemiological studies have found a lack of association between the specific use of benzoyl peroxide and skin cancer. In addition to these findings in humans, 23 carcinogenicity studies in rodents with benzoyl peroxide, including 16 employing topical application, have yielded negative results. An increase in skin carcinomas was reported in 1 study in which benzoyl peroxide in acetone was applied to the skin of SENCAR mice for a 1-year period; however, this study did not employ adequate control groups to fully understand the unusual findings, and the results were inconsistent with those of 6 other similar studies."

http://www.acne.org/faq.html#cancer

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hydrogen peroxide.

There is a great deal of current research showing that hydrogen peroxide is problematic as a topical disinfectant because it can greatly reduce the production of healthy new skin cells (Source: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, September 2001, pages 675–687). Hydrogen peroxide is also a significant oxidizing agent, meaning that it generates free-radical damage. While it can function as a disinfectant, the cumulative problems that can stem from impacting the skin with a substance that is known to generate free-radical damage, impair the skin's healing process, cause cellular destruction, and reduce optimal cell functioning are serious enough so that it is better to avoid its use (Sources: Carcinogenesis, March 2002, pages 469–475; and Anticancer Research, July-August 2001, pages 2719–2724). See free-radical damage

benzoyl peroxide.

Considered the most effective over-the-counter choice for a topical antibacterial agent in the treatment of blemishes (Source: Skin Pharmacology and Applied Skin Physiology, September-October 2000, pages 292–296). The amount of research demonstrating the effectiveness of benzoyl peroxide is exhaustive and conclusive (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, November 1999, pages 710–716). Among benzoyl peroxide's attributes is its ability to penetrate into the hair follicle to reach the bacteria that are causing the problem, and then killing themâ€â€with a low risk of irritation. It also doesn't pose the problem of bacterial resistance that some prescription topical antibacterials (antibiotics) do (Source: Dermatology, 1998, volume 196, issue 1, pages 119–125). Benzoyl peroxide solutions range in strength from 2.5% to 10%. It is best to start with less-potent concentrations, because a 2.5% benzoyl peroxide product is much less irritating than a 5% or 10% concentration, and it can be just as effective. The necessary concentration completely depends on how stubborn the strain of bacteria in your pores happens to be.

source: www.cosmeticcop.com

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dan's regimen on the other hand can definitely damage skin because u put so much BP on ur skin for a long time. the other regimen with C+C products is nice i like it

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