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pitymeplease

Is my typical breakfast killing my progress?

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I'm in the Army so my choices in eating are pretty slim (without going out and spending all my money at restaurants which is arguably worse for your skin).

Breakfast:

5-6 strips of bacon

biscuits and gravy

oatmeal with limited raisins (recently I believe they have been adding sugar to the oatmeal because it's sweeter than it was last week).

Before each meal I take 1000mg Taurine, 30mg Zinc, 40 - 80k hu cayenne, B50 vitamin supplement and drink about a gallon of water per day. My other meals usually consist of a majority of meat and mashed potatoes and a salad with tomatoes and olives. I am concerned about the mashed potatoes because isn't there a good amount of milk added to them?

General advice and an outline to help my progress would be appreciated. Thanks!

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I'd say it's probably the oatmeal, I'm less concerned about the biscuits than I am about the oatmeal.

Most of the other meals sound pretty much ok, but like you said the mashed potatoes could be an issue if you are sensitive to dairy, and mashed potatoes are high in carbs which convert quickly to sugar. So out of everything, top of the list to reduce would be 1)Oatmeal (definitely!) and 2) mashed potatoes. Everything else seems basically ok, unless you find you also react to wheat which is a possibility.

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Well, I would say the biscuits are gravy are trouble. Nothing but refined carbs and probably bad fats, depending on what they use to make them. Empty calories.

If you have a gluten intolerance, they would also be a problem. If you have a grain intolerance, the oats could be a problem too.

Can you ask how the food is made? Don't they have eggs? Isn't it odd that they would feed soldiers so little protein for breakfast?

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Well, I would say the biscuits are gravy are trouble. Nothing but refined carbs and probably bad fats, depending on what they use to make them. Empty calories.

If you have a gluten intolerance, they would also be a problem. If you have a grain intolerance, the oats could be a problem too.

Can you ask how the food is made? Don't they have eggs? Isn't it odd that they would feed soldiers so little protein for breakfast?

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Well, I would say the biscuits are gravy are trouble. Nothing but refined carbs and probably bad fats, depending on what they use to make them. Empty calories.

If you have a gluten intolerance, they would also be a problem. If you have a grain intolerance, the oats could be a problem too.

Can you ask how the food is made? Don't they have eggs? Isn't it odd that they would feed soldiers so little protein for breakfast?

I wondered about that too, pretty much the only protein in that meal is bacon, which in itself is mostly fat. I'm surprised they don't serve eggs too.

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Well, I would say the biscuits are gravy are trouble. Nothing but refined carbs and probably bad fats, depending on what they use to make them. Empty calories.

If you have a gluten intolerance, they would also be a problem. If you have a grain intolerance, the oats could be a problem too.

Can you ask how the food is made? Don't they have eggs? Isn't it odd that they would feed soldiers so little protein for breakfast?

I wondered about that too, pretty much the only protein in that meal is bacon, which in itself is mostly fat. I'm surprised they don't serve eggs too.

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Well, I would say the biscuits are gravy are trouble. Nothing but refined carbs and probably bad fats, depending on what they use to make them. Empty calories.

If you have a gluten intolerance, they would also be a problem. If you have a grain intolerance, the oats could be a problem too.

Can you ask how the food is made? Don't they have eggs? Isn't it odd that they would feed soldiers so little protein for breakfast?

I wondered about that too, pretty much the only protein in that meal is bacon, which in itself is mostly fat. I'm surprised they don't serve eggs too.

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The idea is to avoid allergens to see if it improves your acne. If it doesn't there's no point in continuing to avoid them. Especially not eggs since they have so much nutrition. Allergies vary a lot from person to person, you need to pay attention to which foods help or hurt you, regardless of what other people tell you they think will or won't effect acne. My husband has been giving me a hard time about some things that I avoid saying "That doesn't cause acne." And I have to tell him, it does for me. Even if you are the only one on this board that's effected by a certain food that everyone else has no problem with, that doesn't make it any less valid. Food allergies can vary sooo much from person to person. You need to find out what works for you. The reason I mention those specific foods is because they are the most common allergens, responsible for 90% of food allergies, but that still leaves 10% of people who are allergic to any number of other foods. The point is to find what your trigger is, not to avoid every food that has ever possibly caused a reaction in other people.

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The idea is to avoid allergens to see if it improves your acne. If it doesn't there's no point in continuing to avoid them. Especially not eggs since they have so much nutrition. Allergies vary a lot from person to person, you need to pay attention to which foods help or hurt you, regardless of what other people tell you they think will or won't effect acne. My husband has been giving me a hard time about some things that I avoid saying "That doesn't cause acne." And I have to tell him, it does for me. Even if you are the only one on this board that's effected by a certain food that everyone else has no problem with, that doesn't make it any less valid. Food allergies can vary sooo much from person to person. You need to find out what works for you. The reason I mention those specific foods is because they are the most common allergens, responsible for 90% of food allergies, but that still leaves 10% of people who are allergic to any number of other foods. The point is to find what your trigger is, not to avoid every food that has ever possibly caused a reaction in other people.

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Let's make a little list:

IN GENERAL;

All vegetables are ok except:

-canned

-probably excessively starchy ones like potatoes

All fruits are to be avoided except:

-I've read that berries are pretty low in sugar, but only if they're fresh, which most aren't.

All meats are ok except:

-canned

-processed (sandwich/pre-sliced meats, balogna, hot dogs, etc)

Nuts?:

-varies person to person, some can't eat them at all, some eat them every day, I think this is allergy related and will need to be tested for you individually.

All things containing bread/wheat/dairy are to be avoided?

-only if you've noticed an association with them yourself. Avoiding them has helped a lot of people, but this may not be the case for you. Like in my case, I can usually eat a bit of wheat, but not dairy, and some people are the opposite.

How long do I know if said food caused the breakout? The thing I ate yesterday, three days ago, a week ago, two weeks? How are you supposed to tell? :wall:

-for most people, it's usually anywhere between a few hours (allergy-related) to about 3 days or so, for the break out to show up. That's why elimination diets are very strict for the first couple weeks and then one food is added at a time for about 1 week, and if no problems, you can keep it in your diet, and then add a second new food for about a week, and so on. Many sites go into great detail on food allergy elimination diets and how to follow them, so if you want to try that, it's available.

I makes it harder that you have so much less control over your diet, so I empathize with your frustration. We've all been at the point where we know something is wrong, but we don't know what and we don't know where or how to start to find out. Especially with so little support from the mainstream medical community, in their insistence that diet has nothing to do with acne. We really do understand that feeling, we've all been there.

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Thanks for your post Lili, I really do wish we could get some federally funded research to get to the bottom of this diet puzzle, since it's almost undeniable that diet and acne are directly related. I know these big companies like Galderma, Neutrogena, Clearasil would never research this because it goes against the very existance of their companies! One day... one day...

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I hear there's a clinic opening in NY dedicated to a natural approach to acne treatment. There should be way more than one though, I agree!

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It's like I'm hearing "diet is different for everybody, good luck", and I'm so lost.

Well, the rule of thumb for everyone is cut out processed foods and drinks. White bread, sugar, most commercially baked goods as they will be made with white flour, high fructose corn syrup and hydrogenated fats (margarine, crisco). No one should be eating those things, acne or not.

And that might be enough for you. It's almost enough for me. I also have to avoid citrus. And I think the nutritionally dense foods I eat instead are just as important as what I don't eat anymore.

I just walked through the grocery store and ended up buying noting except 4 microwavable dinners and decided the only thing I can eat in it is the meat, and to scrape off the gravy. Had to avoid the entire fruit and vegetable section because oh, stay away from nuts, stay away from fruit because it has sugar in it. Peanut butter? Nope... Bread? Nope... Cereal / chip / whatever isle? Can't touch that...

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I think mangoes are considered a high-glycemic fruit, and are a more commonly allergenic fruit than most. I looovvvee mangoes though, so frustrating.

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A common universal mistake is to make breakfast carb based.

Most people just eat sweet stuff at breakfast and culturally breakfast is cereals, biscuits and such. But glucose tolerance is at its lowest in the morning. Carbs are okay to stop the massive release of cortisol you're experiencing in the early morning (to stop catabolism) but it's better to increase protein and fats at breakfast. If the whole world could just substitue a breakfast of cerelas, biscuits and whatnot with a breakfast of nuts and eggs (for their praticity) and a piece of fruit, such a small change alone would revolution the health but also the attitude and mood of the whole world.

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