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Nip it in the bud

Difference between Acne and Bacterial infection?

This past September I traveled to South America with barely any acne. My face looked pretty good. Well, while I was there I popped a zit or two with my fingers. Bacteria traveled from my fingers into my pores and I infected my skin. The bacteria is not found in the area I live in but only in some parts of South America. My dermatologist prescribed for me to take penicillin because it is known to kill this bacillus species on my face.

Does anyone know if I can just take Accutane to help my problem? Isn't Acne a combination of both bacteria, skin oil and sebum?

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This past September I traveled to South America with barely any acne. My face looked pretty good. Well, while I was there I popped a zit or two with my fingers. Bacteria traveled from my fingers into my pores and I infected my skin. The bacteria is not found in the area I live in but only in some parts of South America. My dermatologist prescribed for me to take penicillin because it is known to kill this bacillus species on my face.

Does anyone know if I can just take Accutane to help my problem? Isn't Acne a combination of both bacteria, skin oil and sebum?

Acne does frequenlty involve bacteria - but it is a specific kind of bacteria - p. acnes. It is possible that you got exposed a different type of bacteria that was on your hands when you popped the pimples. Penicillin isn't used to treat p. acnes, so I would imagine that your infection involves a different type of bacteria.

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Is it possible to have more then one type of bacteria breeding in my face at one time .....Can I have this bacillus bacteria mixing with the p. acnes and making a intense combination??? ....I only say this b/c before I had this new bacterial infection I had just "Normal" acne with this bacteria that you refered to as P. acnes ( Where do p. acnes come from??)

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Is it possible to have more then one type of bacteria breeding in my face at one time .....Can I have this bacillus bacteria mixing with the p. acnes and making a intense combination??? ....I only say this b/c before I had this new bacterial infection I had just "Normal" acne with this bacteria that you refered to as P. acnes ( Where do p. acnes come from??)

My understanding is that p. acnes exists on most people's skin - those with and without acne. It only becomes a problem when there are clogged pores with lots of oil blocking them, which the bacteria loves to feed on and replicate. It could be that you had inflamed acne due to p.acnes and then got another type of bacterial infection after that. Maybe one of our members who have a bit more medical knowledge can chime in on this one (Oh, Wynne....where are you????)

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Oh, Ok....so the p. acnes in your face feed on the sebum and dead skin cells that hang out in your pores. And when they FEED they GROW. Its really getting confusing now, because I just realized something....the bacteria that infested my face is appearently aerobic (needs oxygen).....ehhh????. So now I'm wondering if this bacillus BACTERIA is feeding on my pores SEBUM or It's feeding on OXYGEN OUTSIDE my skin, or INSIDE my skin?? I'm pretty confused? P.s. Thankyou for your time. I really do appreciate IT

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