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Do i need to moisturize?

Before I went on acne treatment my skin wasnt dry nor was it oily. If I had to choice between the two id say it was more dry than oily. after using differin for 6 months and now using paulas choice 2% BHA gel and paulas choice moisturizer, my skin looks shiny every day. The most I ever had was mild acne, but that was because i put bio oil onto my face for 2-3 weeks and it gave me mild acne on my face. Other htan that, i usually get 4-5 pimples a week, and i was wondering do i need to moisturize every day? My skin isnt even dry but now looks shiny everyday. Also should I be exfoliating everyday and then applying a moisturizer or can i just exfoliate and dont need to worry aboutmoisturizing becausemy skin isnt really dry? thanks for your time

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Before I went on acne treatment my skin wasnt dry nor was it oily. If I had to choice between the two id say it was more dry than oily. after using differin for 6 months and now using paulas choice 2% BHA gel and paulas choice moisturizer, my skin looks shiny every day. The most I ever had was mild acne, but that was because i put bio oil onto my face for 2-3 weeks and it gave me mild acne on my face. Other htan that, i usually get 4-5 pimples a week, and i was wondering do i need to moisturize every day? My skin isnt even dry but now looks shiny everyday. Also should I be exfoliating everyday and then applying a moisturizer or can i just exfoliate and dont need to worry aboutmoisturizing becausemy skin isnt really dry? thanks for your time

And when I say 4-5 pimples(sometimes i only get 2-3), im referring to mainly whiteheads and the occasional pastule. I dont even know if this is classified as acne!

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yeah id say you do need to moisturise.

By using acne medications, your drying your skin out (even if its not visiably dry, its still drier lol) so your skin produces more oil (usually overcompensates) to correct the balance.

by appling moisturiser (non-medicated, non oil based) you are returning the skins moiture levels to normal, and the skin isnt dry, so the skin doesnt product the oil to compensate.

this may take time to work, due to your skin needing to re-adjust to the new moisturised skin.

:)

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Before I went on acne treatment my skin wasnt dry nor was it oily.

So when you say your skin "wasn't dry", do I assume correctly that you were referring to the context of being either oily or not oily?

I ask because the word "dry" is frequently used in an ambiguous context in the posts on this site. It can refer either to a lack of moisture (water) in the skin, or to a lack of oil (sebum). Which one of those did YOU specifically mean?

If I had to choice between the two id say it was more dry than oily. after using differin for 6 months and now using paulas choice 2% BHA gel and paulas choice moisturizer, my skin looks shiny every day. The most I ever had was mild acne, but that was because i put bio oil onto my face for 2-3 weeks and it gave me mild acne on my face. Other htan that, i usually get 4-5 pimples a week, and i was wondering do i need to moisturize every day? My skin isnt even dry but now looks shiny everyday.

Again you use the word "dry" without specifying exactly what you mean. But in general, I'm puzzled by all the talk of moisturizers on this site. I don't really see much point to using them unless it's obvious that your skin really is lacking in moisture. I wouldn't use them just because it's a popular fad or the cool thing to do on this site! ;)

.

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By using acne medications, your drying your skin out (even if its not visiably dry, its still drier lol) so your skin produces more oil (usually overcompensates) to correct the balance.

by appling moisturiser (non-medicated, non oil based) you are returning the skins moiture levels to normal, and the skin isnt dry, so the skin doesnt product the oil to compensate.

I don't know of one iota of scientific evidence in support of that theory, and it very likely isn't true.

.

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Before I went on acne treatment my skin wasnt dry nor was it oily.

So when you say your skin "wasn't dry", do I assume correctly that you were referring to the context of being either oily or not oily?

I ask because the word "dry" is frequently used in an ambiguous context in the posts on this site. It can refer either to a lack of moisture (water) in the skin, or to a lack of oil (sebum). Which one of those did YOU specifically mean?

If I had to choice between the two id say it was more dry than oily. after using differin for 6 months and now using paulas choice 2% BHA gel and paulas choice moisturizer, my skin looks shiny every day. The most I ever had was mild acne, but that was because i put bio oil onto my face for 2-3 weeks and it gave me mild acne on my face. Other htan that, i usually get 4-5 pimples a week, and i was wondering do i need to moisturize every day? My skin isnt even dry but now looks shiny everyday.

Again you use the word "dry" without specifying exactly what you mean. But in general, I'm puzzled by all the talk of moisturizers on this site. I don't really see much point to using them unless it's obvious that your skin really is lacking in moisture. I wouldn't use them just because it's a popular fad or the cool thing to do on this site! ;)

.

Well when I mean dry, i refer to dry as the effect i get after applying BP. The skin is that DRY.

The skin i had before going on acne treatment wasn't dry like that NOR was it just as oily as it is when I apply differin etc. Well its like the 3rd/4th day of doing the BHA/moistruizer stuff and is it true that your skin might loook oily/shiny for a few days while your face gets used to the treatment. It d doesnt look as shiny as when i first used it!

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Before I went on acne treatment my skin wasnt dry nor was it oily.

So when you say your skin "wasn't dry", do I assume correctly that you were referring to the context of being either oily or not oily?

I ask because the word "dry" is frequently used in an ambiguous context in the posts on this site. It can refer either to a lack of moisture (water) in the skin, or to a lack of oil (sebum). Which one of those did YOU specifically mean?

If I had to choice between the two id say it was more dry than oily. after using differin for 6 months and now using paulas choice 2% BHA gel and paulas choice moisturizer, my skin looks shiny every day. The most I ever had was mild acne, but that was because i put bio oil onto my face for 2-3 weeks and it gave me mild acne on my face. Other htan that, i usually get 4-5 pimples a week, and i was wondering do i need to moisturize every day? My skin isnt even dry but now looks shiny everyday.

Again you use the word "dry" without specifying exactly what you mean. But in general, I'm puzzled by all the talk of moisturizers on this site. I don't really see much point to using them unless it's obvious that your skin really is lacking in moisture. I wouldn't use them just because it's a popular fad or the cool thing to do on this site! ;)

.

Well when I mean dry, i refer to dry as the effect i get after applying BP. The skin is that DRY.

The skin i had before going on acne treatment wasn't dry like that NOR was it just as oily as it is when I apply differin etc. Well its like the 3rd/4th day of doing the BHA/moistruizer stuff and is it true that your skin might loook oily/shiny for a few days while your face gets used to the treatment. It d doesnt look as shiny as when i first used it!

I have never attempted moisturizer on my face, for fear it will break out. I was under the misconception that dry skin was good...at least better than oily, acne-prone skin. I picked up Vitamin E 32000iu which i roll on nightly, tried it for a few days so we will see how that works.

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Well when I mean dry, i refer to dry as the effect i get after applying BP. The skin is that DRY.

I don't know what effect you get after applying BP. Do you mean moisture-dry or oil-dry?

.

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Well when I mean dry, i refer to dry as the effect i get after applying BP. The skin is that DRY.

I don't know what effect you get after applying BP. Do you mean moisture-dry or oil-dry?

.

Well my skin looks older and stuff, it doesn't like its got moisture or oily on it and neither does it look fresh it just looks dry and old.

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By using acne medications, your drying your skin out (even if its not visiably dry, its still drier lol) so your skin produces more oil (usually overcompensates) to correct the balance.

by appling moisturiser (non-medicated, non oil based) you are returning the skins moiture levels to normal, and the skin isnt dry, so the skin doesnt product the oil to compensate.

I don't know of one iota of scientific evidence in support of that theory, and it very likely isn't true.

.

I know ,Bryan, this ridiculous theory has risen to unbelievable heights on this board and across the net from ppl. who may suffer from a little shine and think this theory rings true. The surface of the skin DOES NOT have sensors that communicate with the glands and say "hey we are dry up here release more oil". I am prime example of oily skin at its worse and believe me my glands pump out large amounts summer, winter and fall regardless of the humidity and temperature. I hit puberty and thats when it all began my glands went into overdrive due to genetics....my DNA included in every cell and in this case my sebaceous glands instruct it to produce too much and secret too much. My father has this problem so its hereditary. No reason to dump lotion on an already well lubricated face. Makes absolutely no sense. Before I started using Tazorac my face was oily and now that I use the topical it does flake ,due to its properties, in spots but its not making me more oily.

And this theory is not "very unlikely isn't true" it certainly IS NOT true.

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Yes I would recommend moisturizing in the winter, in the mornings. Exfoliating also only needs to be done once a day

Why? He says his skin doesnt feel or look dry but LOOKS shiny. He has oily skin this provides enough moisture.

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i would moisturize in the am after you put on your topicals. see how that goes for awhile and if you need more then moisturize during the day or at night.

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By using acne medications, your drying your skin out (even if its not visiably dry, its still drier lol) so your skin produces more oil (usually overcompensates) to correct the balance.

by appling moisturiser (non-medicated, non oil based) you are returning the skins moiture levels to normal, and the skin isnt dry, so the skin doesnt product the oil to compensate.

I don't know of one iota of scientific evidence in support of that theory, and it very likely isn't true.

.

I know ,Bryan, this ridiculous theory has risen to unbelievable heights on this board and across the net from ppl. who may suffer from a little shine and think this theory rings true. The surface of the skin DOES NOT have sensors that communicate with the glands and say "hey we are dry up here release more oil". I am prime example of oily skin at its worse and believe me my glands pump out large amounts summer, winter and fall regardless of the humidity and temperature. I hit puberty and thats when it all began my glands went into overdrive due to genetics....my DNA included in every cell and in this case my sebaceous glands instruct it to produce too much and secret too much. My father has this problem so its hereditary. No reason to dump lotion on an already well lubricated face. Makes absolutely no sense.

And this theory is not "very unlikely isn't true" it certainly IS NOT true.

Well, it should be noted that there are two distinct theories going around on this forum. One is that the sebaceous glands supposedly adjust their sebum production according to how much oil is on the surface of the skin. That's known as the notorious "feedback theory", and I've been fighting against it here for the last 2-3 years. I think my constant focus on the scientific evidence against that theory has considerably stifled its popularity here, although I still occasionally see a mention of it, probably from newbies.

The other theory going around is rather similar to the "feedback theory", but it's not really the same. The idea is that the sebaceous glands supposedly adjust their sebum production according to how much MOISTURE (not oil) is in the skin. The problem with this slightly altered theory is that I'm unaware of any direct scientific evidence against it, although I still consider it to be highly unlikely. That's why I'm always careful to state it that way, as I did in my post quoted above.

.

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Yes I would recommend moisturizing in the winter, in the mornings. Exfoliating also only needs to be done once a day

Why? He says his skin doesnt feel or look dry but LOOKS shiny. He has oily skin this provides enough moisture.

Oily skin does NOT provide moisture. I should know, I have simultaneously dry (moisture wise) and OILY skin. My face looks like an oil slick most days, and yet it flakes and peels because all the medication I am on have made my skin (not just my face, everywhere) very dry.

So I carefully (just where it's needed) moisturize in the morning to control flaking and so that my makeup goes on better.

Moisturizers that contain water-binding ingredients can be VERY helpful to hydrate the skin and keep it looking and feeling smooth and soft. Now I'm not saying this person necessarily needs to use a moisturizer (I didn't read that closely), but in general, oily skin does not mean you do not need to moisturize.

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Oily skin does NOT provide moisture. I should know, I have simultaneously dry (moisture wise) and OILY skin. My face looks like an oil slick most days, and yet it flakes and peels because all the medication I am on have made my skin (not just my face, everywhere) very dry.

So I carefully (just where it's needed) moisturize in the morning to control flaking and so that my makeup goes on better.

Moisturizers that contain water-binding ingredients can be VERY helpful to hydrate the skin and keep it looking and feeling smooth and soft. Now I'm not saying this person necessarily needs to use a moisturizer (I didn't read that closely), but in general, oily skin does not mean you do not need to moisturize.

I'm glad you posted all that! It fits perfectly with the medical journal study I've posted a few times in the past which showed no correlation between between sebum production and levels of moisture in the skin.

.

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Ah, I have beef with you, too, bryan. :D

Since when is moisturizing just a fad around here? If you haven't noticed, it's pretty much been a "fad" for decades, because most skincare experts recognize it as a smart thing to do for your face.

According to www.cosmeticscop.com:

"Intercellular substances (which I often refer to as ingredients that mimic skin structure) should be the backbone of every moisturizer. In fact, moisturizers are not about giving skin moisture or keeping water in skin. All current research is about moisturizers keeping the outer layer of skin resilient and healthy, and that has little to do with water content. But it does have everything to do with giving skin the substances that keep skin cells intact so they can defend themselves against the environment, feel soft and supple, and maintain a reliable protective balance. Ingredients such as ceramides, cholesterol, fatty acids (linoleic acid, triglycerides, glycerin, phospholipids, lecithin), and glycosaminoglycans (hyaluronic acid, sodium PCA) are essential for helping skin to function normally, as it once did before sun damage and age got the better of us. (Sources: Clinical and Geriatric Medicine, February 2002, pages 103-120; Progress in Lipid Research, January 2003, pages 1-36; Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology & Venereology, November 2002, pages 587-594; Contact Dermatitis, June 2002, pages 331-338; Journal of Investigative Dermatology, May 1996, pages 1096-1101; British Journal of Dermatology, November 1995, pages 679-685; Skin Pharmacology and Physiology, September-October 2004, pages 207-213; Free Radical Research, April 2002, pages 471–477; and Journal of Lipid Research, May 2002, pages 794–804.)"

and

"One of the primary elements in keeping skin healthy is making sure the structure of the epidermis (outer layer of skin) is intact. That structure is defined and created by skin cells that are held together by the intercellular matrix. The intercellular matrix is the "glue" or “mortar†between skin cells that keep them together. It helps prevent individual skin cells from losing water and creates the smooth, non-flaky appearance of healthy, intact skin. The components that do this are often called natural moisturizing factors (NMFs) or ingredients that mimic the structure and function of healthy skin. While the oil and fat components of skin prevent evaporation and provide lubrication to the surface of skin, it is actually the intercellular matrix along with the skin's lipid content that gives skin a good deal of its surface texture and feel.

The intercellular matrix is the skin’s first line of defense against water loss. When the lipid and NMF content of skin is reduced, we experience surface roughness, flaking, fine lines, and a tight, uncomfortable feeling. The longer the skin’s surface layer (stratum corneum) is impaired, the less effective the skin’s intercellular matrix becomes (Sources: Skin Research and Technology, August 2000, pages 128–134; and Dermatologic Therapy, Volume 17, Supplement 1, 2004, pages 43-48). Moreover, the skin's healing process is impaired. NMFs make up an expansive group of ingredients that include amino acids, ceramides, hyaluronic acid, cholesterol, fatty acids, triglycerides, phospholipids, glycosphingolipids, urea, linoleic acid, glycosaminoglycans, glycerin, mucopolysaccharide, and sodium PCA (pyrrolidone carboxylic acid). Ingredients that mimic the lipid content of skin are apricot oil, canola oil, coconut oil, corn oil, jojoba oil, jojoba wax, lanolin, lecithin, olive oil, safflower oil, sesame oil, shea butter, soybean oil, squalane, and sweet almond oil, which can all be extremely helpful for making dry skin look and feel better.

All of the skin's supporting NMFs and lipids are present in the intercellular structure of the epidermis, both between skin cells and in the lipid content on the surface of skin. When any of these ingredients are used in skin-care products, they appear to help stabilize and maintain this complex intercellular-skin matrix. Although none of these very good NMFs and lipids can permanently affect or change skin, they are great at temporarily keeping depleted skin from feeling dry and uncomfortable. More important, all of these ingredients, and many more, can help support the intercellular area of the skin by keeping it intact. This support helps prevent surface irritation from penetrating deeper into the skin, works to keep bacteria out, and aids the skin's immune/healing system. Selecting moisturizers of any kind with NMFs (whether they are labeled as being antiaging, antiwrinkle, serums, lotions, or sunscreens) allows your skin to do its job of repairing and regenerating itself without the impedances brought on when skin is suffering from dryness and excess irritation (Sources: Clinical Geriatric Medicine, February 2002, pages 103-120; Progressive Lipid Research, January 2003, pages 1-36; Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, November 2002, pages 587-594; Contact Dermatitis, June 2002, pages 331-338; Journal of Investigative Dermatology, May 1996, pages 1096-1101; British Journal of Dermatology, November 1995, pages 679-685; Skin Pharmacology and Physiology, September-October 2004, pages 207-213; Free Radical Research, April 2002, pages 471–477; and Journal of Lipid Research, May 2002, pages 794–804). "

:razz:

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Yes I would recommend moisturizing in the winter, in the mornings. Exfoliating also only needs to be done once a day

Why? He says his skin doesnt feel or look dry but LOOKS shiny. He has oily skin this provides enough moisture.

Oily skin does NOT provide moisture. I should know, I have simultaneously dry (moisture wise) and OILY skin. My face looks like an oil slick most days, and yet it flakes and peels because all the medication I am on have made my skin (not just my face, everywhere) very dry.

So I carefully (just where it's needed) moisturize in the morning to control flaking and so that my makeup goes on better.

Moisturizers that contain water-binding ingredients can be VERY helpful to hydrate the skin and keep it looking and feeling smooth and soft. Now I'm not saying this person necessarily needs to use a moisturizer (I didn't read that closely), but in general, oily skin does not mean you do not need to moisturize.

The meds are making you dry and they speed up the turnover rate of the cells. You stop the meds the flaking will stop. You are putting meds that are too stringent for the skin to tolerate. Thats why you are needing lotion.

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Um, yes, that's what I said.

But, you see, the medication I use is somewhat necessary for no acne. So, I would rather have dry skin because of meds that are making me clear and use lotion, than not use medication and have an oily, acne-riddled face.

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Ah, I have beef with you, too, bryan. :D

Since when is moisturizing just a fad around here? If you haven't noticed, it's pretty much been a "fad" for decades, because most skincare experts recognize it as a smart thing to do for your face.

According to www.cosmeticscop.com:

{big snip}

So your opinion is that virtually EVERYBODY needs to smear these "moisturizers" and various skin preservatives all over their skin? Even young people?

Sorry, I don't buy it. I think it's mostly a fad.

.

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Um, yes, that's what I said.

But, you see, the medication I use is somewhat necessary for no acne. So, I would rather have dry skin because of meds that are making me clear and use lotion, than not use medication and have an oily, acne-riddled face.

Continue to use the meds as long as it keeps you clear but you will have deal with the flaking as a downfall. Use the moisturiser as long as its for the flakiness and not to be using it as a way to counteract the oil production which simply will not work. The flaking that you are having must be enough that the oil doesnt saturate the flakes to help it fall off before you apply more topical again and again. It doesnt have time to heal itself. You stop the cream and watch the flakes disappear. And yes oil does provide moisture to the skin. You think that every human body lacks facial moisture and therefore needs a lotion because the industry (and this forum) has pumped your head into believing it needs it? Everyone skin produces oil some normal levels on up to enormous amounts. The oil is there to protect and lubricate the skin...it is natures moisturiser. Normal gland ppl. ,for instance, dont need a lotion why becasue their body produces right amounts and the body takes care of itself. The overly oily ppl. have inherited the wonderful plague of having too much oil and definetly dont need any until med related flaking occurs. The healthy human body can sustain itself as long as it has food, water and shelter. Its not lacking anything especially lotion.

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Um, yes, that's what I said.

But, you see, the medication I use is somewhat necessary for no acne. So, I would rather have dry skin because of meds that are making me clear and use lotion, than not use medication and have an oily, acne-riddled face.

Continue to use the meds as long as it keeps you clear but you will have deal with the flaking as a downfall. Use the moisturiser as long as its for the flakiness and not to be using it as a way to counteract the oil production which simply will not work.

I never said it did, I just said that some people need to use moisturizer because they have dry skin.

And yes oil does provide moisture to the skin. You think that every human body lacks facial moisture and therefore needs a lotion because the industry (and this forum) has pumped your head into believing it needs it? Everyone skin produces oil some normal levels on up to enormous amounts. The oil is there to protect and lubricate the skin...it is natures moisturiser. Normal gland ppl. ,for instance, dont need a lotion why becasue their body produces right amounts and the body takes care of itself. The overly oily ppl. have inherited the wonderful plague of having too much oil and definetly dont need any until med related flaking occurs. The healthy human body can sustain itself as long as it has food, water and shelter. Its not lacking anything especially lotion.

Um, aside from the fact that oil itself isn't what hydrates the skin (it acts as a barrier to prevent water loss), yeah, I didn't say anything to contradict what you said. I NEVER said that "every human body lacks facial moisture". Please do not put words in my mouth.

My only point was that OILY SKIN DOES NOT EQUAL HYDRATED SKIN. Completely different things. Yes, I think that some people can probably live without moisturizer. I don't think it's necessarily a good idea because many moisturizers, in addition to containing antioxidants, also contain sunscreen, which I think we can all agree are beneficial for the skin. I'm just sick of people saying that we've been brainwashed into thinking that moisturizing is beneficial. You make it sound like some kind of government conspiracy. FACT, a well formulated moisturizer CAN be beneficial for your skin. Does everyone need it? NO.

Ah, I have beef with you, too, bryan. :D

Since when is moisturizing just a fad around here? If you haven't noticed, it's pretty much been a "fad" for decades, because most skincare experts recognize it as a smart thing to do for your face.

According to www.cosmeticscop.com:

{big snip}

So your opinion is that virtually EVERYBODY needs to smear these "moisturizers" and various skin preservatives all over their skin? Even young people?

Sorry, I don't buy it. I think it's mostly a fad.

.

Did I say everyone? NO.

I merely was stating that moisturizing CAN BE BENEFICIAL. I never said EVERYONE needs to moisturize. Jesus Christ. What do you guys have against antioxidants and sunscreen?

And you think it's mostly a fad. Well, Mr. Science.....where's the proof that moisturizing does absolutely nothing good for the skin?

Seriously.

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You think that every human body lacks facial moisture and therefore needs a lotion because the industry (and this forum) has pumped your head into believing it needs it? ... The healthy human body can sustain itself as long as it has food, water and shelter. Its not lacking anything especially lotion.

Hahah! I like the succinct way you put that! I think anybody who reads this site inevitably becomes convinced that he/she needs to use a "moisturizer", just because everybody here talks about it all the time! ;)

However, I tend to doubt your claim that sebum is in any way "Nature's moisturizer", because that contradicts the study I've posted before which found that the level of moisture in skin was not associated in any way with sebum levels.

.

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However, I tend to doubt your claim that sebum is in any way "Nature's moisturizer", because that contradicts the study I've posted before which found that the level of moisture in skin was not associated in any way with sebum levels.

What then is natures way?

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