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User47728

Fructose, Insulin, And Taurine!

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Hey, i've been on taurine for quite a while now, i find it useful for my training as well. I've been on it for about for months. Do you think its best to cycle taurine, incase i build up tolerancies to it? I'm not sure how easily a tolerance would build up with this. Do you think it would be wise to take 2 - 4 weeks off and start again ?

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I have been taking taurine for a couple days now and I have noticed something but maybe thats just me. My face just feels a lot less oily? I don't know if this is causing it or what, anyone else experience this?

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Yeah, early on in the thread, taurine got a lot of attention because it was really a new concept. But the overall point of the thread is to stabilize blood sugar/insulin levels, and soluble fiber prevents the food you eat from causing an insulin problem in the first place, whereas taurine is good for dealing with it after the fact. All the supplements recommended in this thread are along the same line, stabilizing insulin levels, and reducing androgens. A quick summary of the top recommended supplements is in the first post of this thread near the top in the light blue box. That's where I keep that latest info on how best to implement to routine.

Some sources of soluble fiber contains a specific acid (I forget the name right now) which binds to certain minerals, but if your fiber source doesn't have that acid in it, then they won't be bound. Usually this is a problem in whole food sources of fiber, like lentils and beans. Glucomannan for example has been isolated from it's source and so I believe it doesn't have that acid in it, so I don't think it's problem. I don't know if psyllium has that acid in it, because it's less refined. I went into more detail of how glucomannan/soluble fiber works in the thread called "Glucomannan", and the other one called "Can someone explain the fiber concept to me?" (or something like that).

There's been some debate about when is best to take taurine. Some say on an empty stomach, some say with meals, I'm not sure. But soluble fiber does bind to bile acids, and taurine is a major component of bile acid, so I'd say keep it a couple hours away from meals taken with soluble fiber.

Wow, thanks for the info. So I had been doing it wrong, I'm glad you told me!

And thanks for the tips on Glucomannan, I'll look for that thread. All I could get in the supermarket was Fibresure but I'll look in some health food shops at the weekend.

I saw the list on the first page but thought I could get away with just the taurine.

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I'm going to try Taurine and I'll update on how it goes. Thanks LiliVG for the info. I thought I'd tried every medication and diet there is but I've not heard about Taurine before. Hopefully...!

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Fructose doesn't cause acne..??

I know I'm going against the grain here, but I'll try to explain what I'm thinking.

The theory is that fructose, glucose and carbohydrates (which are all basically sugar) get turned into fatty triglycerides in the liver; our bodies then get rid of all this through sebum which has a high triglyceride content. Also, all this sugar raises insulin levels, which in turn raises male hormones, which leads to greasy skin.

This theory makes a lot of sense and I think sugars have some effect on acne, just as the hormones in milk most likely make acne worse. But I don't think these are the main causes of acne. I have tried diets that have very low sugar and dairy and my acne hasn't really improved.

When people talk about the sugars in the western diet causing acne they often use as evidence the fact that Asian cultures didn't have much acne until they adopted the western diet. This is true. But, sugars can't be the culprits. I lived in Asia for a while and over there people literally eat sticky white rice for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Ok, they don't eat all the snacks we eat in the West, but all this rice is a very potent form of carbohydrate. If sugars really caused acne then places like Japan and Korea would always have had a moderate acne problem - but they never did. So, sugars cannot be the main cause of acne - it has to be something else in the western diet.

And I think the answer is MEAT. Firstly, in the west we don't eat enough meat. We have maybe a slice of ham in a sandwich, or a slice of burger in a bun. In Asia they eat loads of meat. Secondly, in the west all our meat is cooked and lots of it is processed. We reform meat into sausages and burgers and cornish pasties etc. In Asia they never did; they simply ate meat. Thirdly, in the west we don't eat enough fish. In Asian countries they eat loads of fish, squid, shellfish, etc, and it's often raw.

When I looked into Taurine after reading this thread I realised there's a big connection with Meat.

Because, the only natural source of taurine is meat and seafood - you hardly find it at all in plants. When meat is cooked the taurine is substantially reduced, and I suspect that when meat is processed the taurine gets reduced even more. The best source of taurine by far is sea food. Clams, oysters, octopus, squid, and fish all contain really high amounts of taurine. Asian countries always ate lots of unprocessed food and lots of raw seafood so got really high taurine levels. When they began to process their food and replace some seafood with a more western diet then their taurine levels went down and their acne levels went up.

I also read that monosodium glutamate inhibits taurine. This is an additive which is in all sorts of food, and would make what little taurine our meat provided even less effective.

So, maybe carbs and sugars are only a minor part of the picture. Maybe the problem with the western diet is not enough quality meat and raw fish. I'll have to try taurine now and see if it works.

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I don't think that fructose causing insulin resistance is correct.

I saw a documentary about some diabetics who ate only rawfoods for a month (fruits, veggies, nuts and legumes) and they beat diabetes in 1 month.

Wouldn't that contradict your theory?

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I don't think that fructose causing insulin resistance is correct.

I saw a documentary about some diabetics who ate only rawfoods for a month (fruits, veggies, nuts and legumes) and they beat diabetes in 1 month.

Wouldn't that contradict your theory?

It depends on many factors - if you swap a diet of processed meats, bread, sweets, fast food, tinned foods, cereals, snacks (all full of "added" sugar, and many times the fructose of fruit and lacking in fibre) for raw foods then most people would probably see an improvement and get it under control (although if they swapped back to the bad diet then they would be back to square one - so they haven't beat it, just brought it under control). There was a "evolution" diet on a bbc food program a while back which showed the benefits of eating unprocessed food Truth About Food Evo Diet.

Simply adding a lot of fruit a day to a poor diet that is already full of fructose & glucose (& galactose if you do dairy) isn't going to help if you have intolerances to fructose, or an intolerance to glucose caused by high amounts of fructose in your diet. A lot of people have mild fructose malabsorption (around 30%-40% of the western population) which is often undetected. The rise of fructose as a sweetner in food thanks to cheap processing methods, means that the majority of our diets are unknowingly high in fructose. I've spent a long time puzzling over reasons why this may work, and specifically why this works for me.

International Food Information Council have a friendly view on fructose to keep all their industry friends happy, but it still contains interesting remarks such as

Even though commonly consumed sugars provide basically the same number of calories, they are metabolized and used by the body in different ways. For instance, glucose from dietary sources is digested, absorbed, transported to the liver, and released into the general blood stream. Many tissues take up glucose from the blood to use for energy; this process requires insulin. Fructose is predominantly metabolized in the liver, but unlike glucose it does not require insulin to be used by the body.

So even though their studies say theres "no difference" between HFCS and sugar, the body doesn't see it that way, glucose can be used by all cells in the body and fructose has to be processed by the liver first. Fructose-sweetened Beverages Increases Risk Of Obesity In Rats "In this study, rats receiving fructose-containing beverages presented a pathology similar to metabolic syndrome, which in the short term causes lipid accumulation (hypertriglyceridemia) and fatty liver, and at later stages hypertension, resistance to insulin, diabetes and obesity".

Insulin resistance is a condition in which the body does not effectively use the insulin it produces. The body compensates by producing greater amounts of insulin in order to maintain normal blood glucose levels. Insulin resistance”along with obesity, hypertension, and blood lipid disorders”is part of the metabolic syndrome. Insulin resistance sometimes leads to type II diabetes and heart disease.

Although experimental animals fed very large quantities of fructose have developed insulin resistance, feeding studies in humans have never demonstrated this effect. Excess body fat, lack of physical activity and a genetic predisposition are thought to be the primary drivers for developing insulin resistance, not fructose consumption.

In fact, the defacto standard way to get rats for testing insulin resistance treatments is to feed them on a fructose heavy diet. Theres plenty of research out there about this, and even some related to taurine Taurine modulates kallikrein activity and glucose metabolism in insulin resistant rats - "Taurine effectively improves glucose metabolism in fructose-fed rats presumably via improved insulin action and glucose tolerance".

The IOM also found that diets with more than 25% of caloric intake from added sugars were associated with significantly decreased levels of essential nutrients (e.g., calcium, magnesium, and zinc) in some population groups. Added sugars are sugars and syrups added to foods during processing or preparation. The IOM did not recommend an ideal level of added sugars consumption.

The newly released 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend œchoosing and preparing foods and beverages with little added sugars or caloric sweeteners. Because fructose is a component of most added sugars, moderating the amount of added sugars in the diet will automatically moderate fructose intake. Added sugars do not include the fructose found naturally in fruits and vegetables, which is covered under the consumption levels recommended by the Dietary Guidelines of; 4½ cups per day; 2 cups of fruit, and 2½ cups of vegetables.

So high added sugars in the diet can decrease essential nutrients and you shouldn't consume more than 2 cups of fruit a day! And thats for a normal healthy person, with no malabsorption problems and a healthy moderate diet with little "added" sugars or sweeteners.

I find it interesting that people will go out of their way to disbelieve fructose can be a bad thing, i think this is mainly down to the fact it's in fruit therefore it must be good, because fruit is good. Nonsense - fruit is mostly "good" because of vitamins/antioxidants and fibre and it can be eaten unprocessed. Most fruit has a sweet taste because of the sugar levels, in the same way most chocolate bars have a sweet taste because they are full of sugar. Pure fruit juice is just as sugary and as coke, and if you filter all the bits out of it, then it's even worse cos you've lost most of that important fibre.

And this has been said many times - this will not cure everyones acne. Taurine has a few benefits, and if your lacking B vitamins and certain amino acids or have liver problems then your body can't create enough of it. Bad diet, sugar, alcohol & stress can all deplete taurine levels. It's not a miracle cure for acne, it's a natural non-essential amino acid which can become essential if your body's not making enough of it! It's helped quiet a lot of people, and it's worth a try - so i wouldn't dismiss it till you've tried it!

For me, i have to take a taurine supplement & have a very low fructose diet - taurine alone didn't work for me! I eat low fructose veg, occasionally some fruit, some fibre, and some basic vitamin supplements and every so often have some "junk" food as a treat and manage to stay clear. I haven't really been following the thread - i know at some point it started changing into an "insulin" thread which is ok, but i think the main information of fructose & taurine & malabsorption shouldn't get lost along the way - i believe it's all part of the same puzzle! Until i have time, money to do real research, my answer seems to be poor diet (very high in fructose, high in glucose, low in fibre, low in essential aminos) over a long period is the problem. Seeing how improving my digestion, reducing my carbs/sugar, taking nutrient supplements all "helped" my acne, then i think my problems look something like this below

              -> glucose malabsorption                 }
                                -> poor digestion      } 
High fructose -> stressed liver -> poor sugar control  } acne
                                -> poor detoxifying    }
              -> low essential nutrients               }

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Is there a list of high fructose veg?

I really like onions and peppers but I heard they are high fructose. What's ok?

I'm also confused about potatos vs sweet potatos.

Also, why are nuts and seeds recommended to be avoided? Is it because a lot of people react to them? It's not specifically related to the the diet, just recommended because it's a possible trigger?

Can anyone explain? I keep searching the net but a lot of stuff seems to contradict each other!

I've been doing the diet for a few weeks now and it was improving very gradually but I've had a bit of a flare up so I'm a bit worried. It could be my cycle so it's hard to tell.

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To anyone who can answer this:

If the liver is supposedly hampered or damaged in some way, does Taurine actually repair it such that one need not take it indefinitely? So the problem stems from one's inability to properly digest food...?

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In the studies on taurine, liver damage was repaired. I don't remember if the implication was that the taurine repaired the damage, or that the taurine prevented further damage, thereby allowing the liver the heal normally. Either way, liver damage did reverse.

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Is there a list of high fructose veg?

I really like onions and peppers but I heard they are high fructose. What's ok?

I'm also confused about potatos vs sweet potatos.

Also, why are nuts and seeds recommended to be avoided? Is it because a lot of people react to them? It's not specifically related to the the diet, just recommended because it's a possible trigger?

Can anyone explain? I keep searching the net but a lot of stuff seems to contradict each other!

I've been doing the diet for a few weeks now and it was improving very gradually but I've had a bit of a flare up so I'm a bit worried. It could be my cycle so it's hard to tell.

Avoiding the top 7 allergens is mostly to avoid systemic inflammation, which increases the rate that skin cells migrate to the surface of the skin, the last thing someone with acne needs. If you have not noticed a reaction to nuts, by all means eat them. Nuts have a lot of healthful properties if you don't have an allergic reaction to them. But I think everyone should avoid Milk/dairy products, which has been shown to increase IGF-1 levels up to 30% in teens and up to 20% in adults.

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I don't think that fructose causing insulin resistance is correct.

I saw a documentary about some diabetics who ate only rawfoods for a month (fruits, veggies, nuts and legumes) and they beat diabetes in 1 month.

Wouldn't that contradict your theory?

Not at all, in fact it supports it. A diet of raw fruits and vegetables would be overall lower in sugars and fructose than a typical western diet. And the proportion of fructose to glucose would be far more natural. This was discussed in depth near the beginning of the thread, about how in nature: fruit is seasonal, so the total intake of fructose per year would be extremely low; Most of the carbohydrates in vegetables are in the forum of starch, which is converted into pure glucose in the body. So most vegetables provide mostly glucose, and some fructose. A diet of all raw would also be much higher in fiber, which slows down how quickly sugars you do eat are absorbed into the blood stream. This prevents insulin spikes, and improves insulin sensitivity. You also wouldn't be eating all the additives in processed foods, your omega-6/omega-3 ratio would be much better, the diet would be completely free of trans fats, and so you're not triggering systemic inflammation, which depletes vitamins, minerals, taurine and many other important nutrients in many forms.

Many people who switch to a "vegan" diet mistakenly start eating a lot of pasta (a refined carb) for calories, which isn't better than eating white bread every day. So many who switch to a vegan diet see their acne get worse. They are usually confused by this, thinking being a vegan is healthy. But any diet high in refined carbs will not be healthy. A 100% raw diet contains 0 refined carbs. This is consistent with cultures for whom 75% of their calories come in the form of carbs, but because none of them are refined, acne does not exist for them. refined sweeteners and refined carbs are bad, no way around it.

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I am now 100% sure that sugar gives me breakouts. I've kept it out of my diet for the past two weeks, never been so clear, never had no mid-day shine on a constant basis.

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Is there a list of high fructose veg?

I really like onions and peppers but I heard they are high fructose. What's ok?

I'm also confused about potatos vs sweet potatos.

Also, why are nuts and seeds recommended to be avoided? Is it because a lot of people react to them? It's not specifically related to the the diet, just recommended because it's a possible trigger?

Can anyone explain? I keep searching the net but a lot of stuff seems to contradict each other!

I've been doing the diet for a few weeks now and it was improving very gradually but I've had a bit of a flare up so I'm a bit worried. It could be my cycle so it's hard to tell.

Avoiding the top 7 allergens is mostly to avoid systemic inflammation, which increases the rate that skin cells migrate to the surface of the skin, the last thing someone with acne needs. If you have not noticed a reaction to nuts, by all means eat them. Nuts have a lot of healthful properties if you don't have an allergic reaction to them. But I think everyone should avoid Milk/dairy products, which has been shown to increase IGF-1 levels up to 30% in teens and up to 20% in adults.

Just to add my two cents...peanuts are legumes that contain lectins and phytates that can block zinc metabolism and other processes- so for some people this could cause probs. Also, other nuts in moderation cuz they contain alot of inflammatory omega 6's- macadamia nuts have the least.

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I've registered and read the e-book. All very informative...

With that said, what I'd like to know about LiliVG is, how did she come to acquire all of this information, is she working in a medical or biology field? Also, with the website, I've noticed the term "we" used a lot, who is "we", I thought it was just her? I don't mean to come off negative, but with the plethora of different ideas and theories on how to cure acne, I'm just very curious to know more...I mean why start a website, why not just have a pdf attachment? Why are there google ads on the site promoting health supplements? I'm not trying to sound accusational or cynical, but as an objective observer/participant.

Digressing, there has been mentioned about the notion of one being insulin resistant...

I myself, the last couple of years, have noticed that whenever I am very hungry or if I have exercised heavily and then afterwards I eat food, sometimes I will get a slight headache. I did some research and found that I may have what is called reactive hypoglycemia...which seems not relatively harmless but is there a connection between this and being insulin resistant?

Finally, it now seems having a fiber soluble supplement is the most important key, not so much taurine? How long does one have to be on this? It sounds like an indefinite thing....

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So I've been on a meat and veggies diet for about a few weeks now, and just started a day or so ago taking Taurine, while today I got my B-complex and started taking that. Also today was the first day in about 4 days I washed my face (was also experimenting with that). Anyways, for lunch I didn't feel like eating my normal foods so I "tested' my body by eating at Subway:

1 footlong grilled chicken and bacon ranch sub, with lettuce, tomatoes, cucumbers, banana peppers, provolone cheese, ranch dressing, all on italian bread

Plus: bag of sunchips, large Valt (drank the whole thing!), and 2 big cookies: chocolate chip and double chocolate chip.

I took a b-complex before the meal (first one of the day) and 2 500mg Taurine.

Yes, I purposely ate that much sugar just to see the effects. Well this wasn't really that good of an experiment because there were too many variables, BUT:

- my pee turned super bright yellow lol. I think it was the Taurine but I started taking that a few days ago and never noticed it then

- the only major new pimple is a small whitehead on my chin. i guess we'll see what happens in the morning

Anyways, the main reason I was going to post here is for my crazy colored pee but I got a little long winded :)

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This morning, I had myself some brown rice porridge, and I noticed my skin was pretty oily around noon...I also felt a bit tired after eating it...What does this mean? The GI index for porridge is only about medium...Is there are connection?

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I've registered and read the e-book. All very informative...

With that said, what I'd like to know about LiliVG is, how did she come to acquire all of this information, is she working in a medical or biology field? Also, with the website, I've noticed the term "we" used a lot, who is "we", I thought it was just her? I don't mean to come off negative, but with the plethora of different ideas and theories on how to cure acne, I'm just very curious to know more...I mean why start a website, why not just have a pdf attachment? Why are there google ads on the site promoting health supplements? I'm not trying to sound accusational or cynical, but as an objective observer/participant.

Digressing, there has been mentioned about the notion of one being insulin resistant...

I myself, the last couple of years, have noticed that whenever I am very hungry or if I have exercised heavily and then afterwards I eat food, sometimes I will get a slight headache. I did some research and found that I may have what is called reactive hypoglycemia...which seems not relatively harmless but is there a connection between this and being insulin resistant?

Finally, it now seems having a fiber soluble supplement is the most important key, not so much taurine? How long does one have to be on this? It sounds like an indefinite thing....

I need a full website because I'm going to have articles about each individual supplement that people consider using to fight acne, some are worth looking into, some articles will basically say, "This has a lot of hype, but isn't worth it", etc.

The "we" is just acknowledging that I have not come up with all of this information all by myself. A lot of credit goes to this website actually. I plan on mentioning the forum on this website specifically on my site as credit because I have learned a lot from this site, such as being able to observe what people have said has worked for them, and subjects that have come up frequently, and tend to always peter out, etc. At the beginning of the e-book, it says specifically, this ebook is not just the opinion of one person, but the accumulative experiences and research of many individuals. So somethings I refer to "we", and some I say "I", it depends on the reference. I also plan on bringing other people into the management of the site eventually, and the "we" reflects that plan.

I have Google ads on the site to cover the hosting fees. My long term goal is to make it so that I can be able to dedicate my time to helping people clear their skin kind of as my "job", which means I need to be able to make a living off it. NOT by charging people directly, but probably through affiliate links on the site. People buy products to help clear their acne anyway, and people ask me all the time for recommendations. I think it's fair if I got a commission for those recommendations. I don't plan on promoting any specific brand over others unless there is a real difference in effectiveness, so for the most part, I'm thinking I'll probably just link to a keyword on Amazon, or one of those price shopper websites or something. I haven't done any of that yet.

You don't necessarily have to be insulin resistant to have unhealthy blood sugar cycles that can cause and/or contribute to acne. It's really the blood sugar pattern that's the problem, and insulin resistance exacerbates that pattern problem. Insulin resistance is universally present in adolescence and pregnancy, one reason being thought that GH decreases sensitivity to insulin. So basically, if you are in puberty, you do have insulin resistance. If you have adult acne, you might, you might not.

I am not a doctor, nor am I in any medical field. I have always been very clear about that, in this thread, as well as any other time I've been asked that question. I do need to add an "About Me" page to the site though, thanks for reminding me of that :) The site is still in the construction phase.

The information I base my approach on is based on studies published in medical journals. I am very picky about where I get my information from. The internet is full of people with all kinds of opinions, some more accurate than others, and some nothing more than quackery, and they all get equal right to being published online, so I make sure the information I rely on is from real studies published in medical journals that I have read first hand. I plan on linking to those studies directly from within the ebook when I get the chance to sit down and get all those gathered up in one place.

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Is Taurine supposed to keep oil production down as well? Ever since I started taking it my skin has been a lot less oily. I'm also doing the no-wash regimen and before I washed my face for the first time in 4 days, my face was super oily. Now it's been about another 2-3 days since I washed my face and my skin is normal! Is this the Taurine?

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- my pee turned super bright yellow lol. I think it was the Taurine but I started taking that a few days ago and never noticed it then

- the only major new pimple is a small whitehead on my chin. i guess we'll see what happens in the morning

Anyways, the main reason I was going to post here is for my crazy colored pee but I got a little long winded :)

This is from the b complex and is completely normal, it happens to everyone. It'll be that way for as long as you're taking a b supplement.

Is Taurine supposed to keep oil production down as well? Ever since I started taking it my skin has been a lot less oily. I'm also doing the no-wash regimen and before I washed my face for the first time in 4 days, my face was super oily. Now it's been about another 2-3 days since I washed my face and my skin is normal! Is this the Taurine?

Many have noticed the taurine making their skin drier. So yes, it's the taurine. :)

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"Many have noticed the taurine making their skin drier. So yes, it's the taurine. "

I've noticed the exact opposite! I'm not sure why...I may have to put a halt on the taurine experiment.

I have a theory on this:

Along the premise that I am not really insulin resistant:

Anytime I eat food, naturally my blood sugar will rise and x-amount of insulin gets produced to level it out. This is the natural way of how our bodies work (Let me know if I'm wrong).

But, If I'm taking a lot of taurin which makes me more sensitive to insulin, even if I'm producing normal amounts, it would lead to a reaction of increased hormones which leads to more oil production. I seem to have gotten a few pimples below my jawline, which normally is indicative of hormonal origins...In addition, the reaction also seems to encourage "food coma" after a meal...

I don't know if my theory makes any sense but I have to think that if I were insulin resistant, I should be having more similar reactions (positive) to others who have had success.

Hypothesis:

So if one is insulin resistant, taurin helps to reduce the amount of insulin needed to balance out blood sugar.

If one is not insulin resistant, taurin may make one extra sensitive to the amount he/she produces, causing a similar reaction of increased androgens which leads to skin problems.

Now if there is something else at work here, something not of what I suspect, then it is beyond my understanding at this point for nobody else seems to have encountered what I have.

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I stopped taking the supplements because I've had a breakout but I think it was due to bad sleep pattern. We'll see. I'm not taking the B complex for now, only vitamin D. The B complex I noticed made my urine almost as yellow as a yellow marker.

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