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User47728

Fructose, Insulin, And Taurine!

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Hey Guys,

This is a great topic. For sure, Fructose is a cause. I did without fructose and refined sugar for 3 months and this was a major contributing factor in getting my face clear. I have encountered a problem recently and wanted to know if anyone had a suggestion. During the 3 month interval, I started getting headaches and went to about every doctor. I had an MRI done, Cat Scan,.... the works. Recently they are pointing fingers to dehydration problems and the doctors are requiring I drink this fructose/salt solution every morning. As you might have guessed, welcome back acne. So how do you stay hydrated and at the same time stay away from fructose (A fundamental element in keeping our bodies hydrated). Any suggestions on this dilemma?

-Thanks

I don't know how sensitive you are, but fructose in fruit doesn't break me out. Added sugar anywhere else (dark chocolate, herring, yoghurt) almost always does. I think that the fiber in fruit somehow balances out the bad effects of fructose. And I am talking about actual fruit, not fruit juice. Fruit juice is bad news for me.

For a start, whoever told you that our bodies need fructose is telling massive fibs! It's not vital or essential in anyway. All eskimo's would be long since extinct if that indeed was the case. Headaches are serious though. Did they do all blood work before declaring that salt and fruit sugar would cure you? (like are you lacking some minerals and glucose?). I really don't get the idea where everyone believes that fruit sugar is good because it's in fruit. It's still sugar, and if people can be intolerant to gluten, why can't they have problems with fructose? Could you ask for a fructose hydrogen breath test? It's not hard, and it may be vital if they are force feeding you fructose.

Fructose != Acne. I can't find anything that suggests eating fructose would directly create acne. What i can find is that intolerance/overloading of fructose reduces your glucose tolerance. Then if you eat more glucose than your daily limit, or have too much at a single time, then it could cause acne. This is definitely what happens to me, i cant eat some glucose if i remove fructose and take taurine, if i eat too much glucose i get spots, if i eat more than a tiny amount of fructose i get spots, if i don't take the taurine i get spots. Taurine has been studied with respect to improving glucose tolerance when it's been reduced by a high fructose diet. More than a small bit of fruit breaks me out, as it contains both fructose and glucose. Sugar is sugar is sugar! It's all about amounts, tolerances and control!

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Fructose is not necessary for hydration, it's just a flavoring agent in the salt drink they're giving you. It's the salt that will make you hold onto more water, not the fructose. Just make sure you get enough salt and drink enough water and you won't have to drink the fructose drink they've given you. That's assuming it's not medicated.

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Thanks guys. The funny thing about doctors is that that have P.H.Ds and yet they can't even turn out a good solution to resolve my problems (Its been like this for 3 months). It is really frustrating and I am always asking the question:

Why I am paying you?

I have had all the tests and I don't understand why they say everything is normal. I can't believe that a blood test would not pop up with more results so that they can give a conclusive/sound treatment. I am really loosing faith in the medical community. Anyways, I will give the solution without fructose a shot and start increasing my Taurine intake,

Thanks again for all the suggestions

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Thanks guys. The funny thing about doctors is that that have P.H.Ds and yet they can't even turn out a good solution to resolve my problems (Its been like this for 3 months). It is really frustrating and I am always asking the question:

Why I am paying you?

I have had all the tests and I don't understand why they say everything is normal. I can't believe that a blood test would not pop up with more results so that they can give a conclusive/sound treatment. I am really loosing faith in the medical community. Anyways, I will give the solution without fructose a shot and start increasing my Taurine intake,

Thanks again for all the suggestions

Just check the label for how much salt is in the drink they gave you, and make sure you get that much salt as bare minimum each day. You can also put salt in an empty gelcap and swallow it whole, that makes it easier, I've done that before. It did give me a stomach ache if I didn't take it with food and enough water though.

I can totally relate to wondering why you're paying the doctor, especially the dermatologists. You wait half an hour, they see you for 5 minutes and just tell you that only drugs will fix it. I never knew we all had patented drug deficiencies! And that all costs several hundred dollars, and you're not any better off than you were.

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For a start, whoever told you that our bodies need fructose is telling massive fibs! It's not vital or essential in anyway. All eskimo's would be long since extinct if that indeed was the case. Headaches are serious though. Did they do all blood work before declaring that salt and fruit sugar would cure you? (like are you lacking some minerals and glucose?). I really don't get the idea where everyone believes that fruit sugar is good because it's in fruit. It's still sugar, and if people can be intolerant to gluten, why can't they have problems with fructose? Could you ask for a fructose hydrogen breath test? It's not hard, and it may be vital if they are force feeding you fructose.

Eskimos probably get some fructose from sugar sources in their food. Not just as much and not from fruit. It is probably needed for something but not in Westernized diet doses.

Just check the label for how much salt is in the drink they gave you, and make sure you get that much salt as bare minimum each day. You can also put salt in an empty gelcap and swallow it whole, that makes it easier, I've done that before. It did give me a stomach ache if I didn't take it with food and enough water though.

Is regular salt OK or is it harmful? I know there is a lot of warnings about over consuming salt.

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For a start, whoever told you that our bodies need fructose is telling massive fibs! It's not vital or essential in anyway. All eskimo's would be long since extinct if that indeed was the case. Headaches are serious though. Did they do all blood work before declaring that salt and fruit sugar would cure you? (like are you lacking some minerals and glucose?). I really don't get the idea where everyone believes that fruit sugar is good because it's in fruit. It's still sugar, and if people can be intolerant to gluten, why can't they have problems with fructose? Could you ask for a fructose hydrogen breath test? It's not hard, and it may be vital if they are force feeding you fructose.

Eskimos probably get some fructose from sugar sources in their food. Not just as much and not from fruit. It is probably needed for something but not in Westernized diet doses.

Just check the label for how much salt is in the drink they gave you, and make sure you get that much salt as bare minimum each day. You can also put salt in an empty gelcap and swallow it whole, that makes it easier, I've done that before. It did give me a stomach ache if I didn't take it with food and enough water though.

Is regular salt OK or is it harmful? I know there is a lot of warnings about over consuming salt.

Regular salt is fine. The concern with too much salt is for people who have high blood pressure and who are at risk for heart disease. And only 2% of people with high blood pressure respond to a low sodium diet anyway, so I really wouldn't worry about it. Plus, I doubt your doctors have in mind that you'd be supplementing salt indefinitely. But there is a certain amount of salt a person needs everyday, which I think is about minimum 500mgs (1/4 tsp), and a max of 2400mgs (1 tsp). Stay in that range, and you'll be fine.

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I only scanned over this, but you might want to read this. I think taurine is related a state of hypnatremia. Read it along with the wikipedia article on hyponatremia and it might start to make sense to you.

Here's the link.

Good luck.

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Eskimos probably get some fructose from sugar sources in their food. Not just as much and not from fruit. It is probably needed for something but not in Westernized diet doses.

This is always being debated :). Theres a famous case of 2 "fellows" going on an all meat diet to prove it's safe(ish). The majority of Eskimos these days have fairly normal bad diet's like the rest of us i'm sure, but way back then most of the year they would have lived on meat & fish. Your body can and will synthesize glucose from excess protein if it needs it but never fructose. There are of course numerous problems with high meat diets, especially the "meat" we eat today, like cooking (have to cook them cos of e.coli, but you lose lots of nutrients), not eating them really fresh, not eating the organs,the general pollution from the world we live in and things like increased long term cancer risk and possible heart and liver problems then you'd be wise to pick a balanced diet as possible!

Fructose is not vital, it just happens to be in things that have benefits to us humans, like antioxidants and vitamins. Fructose is not a plus point just because it's called fruit sugar! And it's definitely not essential - think of it as the annoying cousin of glucose, the cousin that always tag's along and isn't welcome ;)

Stefansson is also a figure of considerable interest in dietary circles, especially those with an interest in very low-carbohydrate diets. Stefansson documented the fact that most Inuit lived on a diet of about 90% meat and fish, often going 6-9 months a year on nothing but meat and fish--essentially, a zero-carb diet. He found that he and his fellow European-descent explorers were also perfectly healthy on such a diet. When medical authorities questioned him on this, he and a fellow explorer agreed to undertake a study under the auspices of the Journal of the American Medical Association to demonstrate that they could eat a 100% meat diet in a closely-observed laboratory setting for the first several weeks, with paid observers for the rest of an entire year. The results were published in the Journal of the AMA, and both men were perfectly healthy on such a diet, without vitamin supplementation or anything else in their diet except meat.[3] However, hunters like the Inuits, who traditionally obtain most of their dietary energy from wild animals and therefore eat a low-carbohydrate diet,[4] seem to have a high mortality from stroke.[5]
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HELLO everyone, this is my first post on this forum, but I've been reading lots of topics over 1 month.

I just started the Taurine/b-complex regimen

but I have a question about the food I should eat.

right now I am eating veggies, tuna, whole wheat bread, yogurt (0% sugar.. that's what they say in the container) lots of water, apple juice and green tea, chicken, white rice, eggs sometimes pasta.

so my question is.. I've read that wheat products should be limited.. so does that mean I have to limit my whole wheat bread?

and about the yogurt claiming to have 0% sugar, still they add artificial and natural flavours.. should I trust them?

thanks in advance and I hope this regimen will improve my skin and overall health!!! I'm very enthusiastic about it.

btw I have L-taurine pills, is it the same as taurine? the person who sold it to me said is the same aminoacid.

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HELLO everyone, this is my first post on this forum, but I've been reading lots of topics over 1 month.

I just started the Taurine/b-complex regimen

but I have a question about the food I should eat.

right now I am eating veggies, tuna, whole wheat bread, yogurt (0% sugar.. that's what they say in the container) lots of water, apple juice and green tea, chicken, white rice, eggs sometimes pasta.

so my question is.. I've read that wheat products should be limited.. so does that mean I have to limit my whole wheat bread?

and about the yogurt claiming to have 0% sugar, still they add artificial and natural flavours.. should I trust them?

thanks in advance and I hope this regimen will improve my skin and overall health!!! I'm very enthusiastic about it.

btw I have L-taurine pills, is it the same as taurine? the person who sold it to me said is the same aminoacid.

I tried for awhile with "sometimes pasta" but now I know that I just have to stop pasta. You might want to find some healthy alternatives & kiss pasta good-bye. G'luck.

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Thanks guys. The funny thing about doctors is that that have P.H.Ds and yet they can't even turn out a good solution to resolve my problems (Its been like this for 3 months). It is really frustrating and I am always asking the question:

Why I am paying you?

I have had all the tests and I don't understand why they say everything is normal. I can't believe that a blood test would not pop up with more results so that they can give a conclusive/sound treatment. I am really loosing faith in the medical community. Anyways, I will give the solution without fructose a shot and start increasing my Taurine intake,

Thanks again for all the suggestions

There's fructose in it because that's what they give people with dehydration from diarrhea and illness. Don't buy it.

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HELLO everyone, this is my first post on this forum, but I've been reading lots of topics over 1 month.

I just started the Taurine/b-complex regimen

but I have a question about the food I should eat.

right now I am eating veggies, tuna, whole wheat bread, yogurt (0% sugar.. that's what they say in the container) lots of water, apple juice and green tea, chicken, white rice, eggs sometimes pasta.

so my question is.. I've read that wheat products should be limited.. so does that mean I have to limit my whole wheat bread?

and about the yogurt claiming to have 0% sugar, still they add artificial and natural flavours.. should I trust them?

thanks in advance and I hope this regimen will improve my skin and overall health!!! I'm very enthusiastic about it.

btw I have L-taurine pills, is it the same as taurine? the person who sold it to me said is the same aminoacid.

I'd cut out all fruit juice, dairy and wheat, including the wheat pasta and whole wheat bread until your skin clears and then try adding them in and see how your skin reacts. Right now I use Tinkyada brown rice pasta instead of wheat pasta, and I can't tell the difference between it and wheat noodles as far as taste and texture. Other brands of rice pasta have not lived up to Tinkyada though, they fall apart way too easily. Yogurts that claim to have 0 sugar are usually sweetened with splenda or aspartame, chemical sweeteners. I don't know about their effect on acne, but I'm opposed to them for over all health in general. Plus, many have found that any dairy, yogurt included, breaks them out. But for others, milk s out, but yogurt is ok, so I'd just be cautious about yogurt, it's possibly an acne trigger for some.

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I am working on a theory regarding vit. D deficiency (actually its a prehormone, but anyway) and I see that there is a bit of research regarding vit D's effects on insulin. Here is a recent one re: the oh-so-familiar metabolic syndrome. There are others if you just do a general search of vitamin d and insulin or IGF or IGFBP. (The paleo document that you've probably all seen doesn't mention vitamin D but mentions the IGF1 and IGFBP3.) You have to take them all together and connect the dots yourself, since there is lacking research regarding vit D deficiency-->metabolic syndrome-->acne.

What do y'all think of this and, if you don't mind me asking, what do you estimate your daily dose of vitamin D to be? (supplement value + fortified foods + #minutes in sun, although the sun may be too weak at certain latitudes this time of year)

FYI, in addition to the insulin relationship, vitamin D is involved in keratinocytes. Vit D functioning, besides the whole bone thing, include: anti proliferation, differentiation, immunosuppression...all sound familiar to us? Vit D and Vit A share some receptors and it is possible that the receptors are really the key...which would explain why vitamin A is used successfully in reprogramming the skin. Now I am wondering if Vitamin D could be a safer alternative. Plus, you should know, the RDAs have been grossly underestimated for half a century. It is much safer than people think, even at high doses. Anyway, hope you guys might give it a look and let me know what you think.

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ok so eggs are out, milk out, and wheat bread out.. so can I replace the wheat bread for flax bread?

I'm also consuming vegetables and meat, but in between meals I am experiencing more hunger and before I just ate bread or crackers... now that I know I can't eat it.. I need to find something that replaces my bread, my milk and my eggs.. they were my breakfast and in between meals =(

veggies are good but I don't feel full! and I feel hungry every hour.. I drink water to deceive my stomach but is not working lol

so far so good with the taurine.. haven't experienced breakouts.. well I just got one very very small, and the 3 cysts I had before taking it are drying out.

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I am working on a theory regarding vit. D deficiency (actually its a prehormone, but anyway) and I see that there is a bit of research regarding vit D's effects on insulin. Here is a recent one re: the oh-so-familiar metabolic syndrome. There are others if you just do a general search of vitamin d and insulin or IGF or IGFBP. (The paleo document that you've probably all seen doesn't mention vitamin D but mentions the IGF1 and IGFBP3.) You have to take them all together and connect the dots yourself, since there is lacking research regarding vit D deficiency-->metabolic syndrome-->acne.

What do y'all think of this and, if you don't mind me asking, what do you estimate your daily dose of vitamin D to be? (supplement value + fortified foods + #minutes in sun, although the sun may be too weak at certain latitudes this time of year)

FYI, in addition to the insulin relationship, vitamin D is involved in keratinocytes. Vit D functioning, besides the whole bone thing, include: anti proliferation, differentiation, immunosuppression...all sound familiar to us? Vit D and Vit A share some receptors and it is possible that the receptors are really the key...which would explain why vitamin A is used successfully in reprogramming the skin. Now I am wondering if Vitamin D could be a safer alternative. Plus, you should know, the RDAs have been grossly underestimated for half a century. It is much safer than people think, even at high doses. Anyway, hope you guys might give it a look and let me know what you think.

I am very interested in this link between vitamin d and insulin resistance. I know it would make sense for me personally as I have tended to not get much sun at all for the last several years. But my questions about it are: what is the difference fron sun-generated vitamin d and food-source/supplement vitamin d? And is there a trend of people with acne not getting out in the sun enough? Also, if it's vitamin d, wouldn't that make those with dark skin more prone to acne than those with light skin, and is that the case?

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I am working on a theory regarding vit. D deficiency (actually its a prehormone, but anyway) and I see that there is a bit of research regarding vit D's effects on insulin. Here is a recent one re: the oh-so-familiar metabolic syndrome. There are others if you just do a general search of vitamin d and insulin or IGF or IGFBP. (The paleo document that you've probably all seen doesn't mention vitamin D but mentions the IGF1 and IGFBP3.) You have to take them all together and connect the dots yourself, since there is lacking research regarding vit D deficiency-->metabolic syndrome-->acne.

What do y'all think of this and, if you don't mind me asking, what do you estimate your daily dose of vitamin D to be? (supplement value + fortified foods + #minutes in sun, although the sun may be too weak at certain latitudes this time of year)

FYI, in addition to the insulin relationship, vitamin D is involved in keratinocytes. Vit D functioning, besides the whole bone thing, include: anti proliferation, differentiation, immunosuppression...all sound familiar to us? Vit D and Vit A share some receptors and it is possible that the receptors are really the key...which would explain why vitamin A is used successfully in reprogramming the skin. Now I am wondering if Vitamin D could be a safer alternative. Plus, you should know, the RDAs have been grossly underestimated for half a century. It is much safer than people think, even at high doses. Anyway, hope you guys might give it a look and let me know what you think.

I am very interested in this link between vitamin d and insulin resistance. I know it would make sense for me personally as I have tended to not get much sun at all for the last several years. But my questions about it are: what is the difference fron sun-generated vitamin d and food-source/supplement vitamin d? And is there a trend of people with acne not getting out in the sun enough? Also, if it's vitamin d, wouldn't that make those with dark skin more prone to acne than those with light skin, and is that the case?

As we are only recently seeing the adverse health effects of a decade or so of "fear of the sun", it is only now that adequate research into the role of vitamin D is being thoroughly undertaken. Therefore, there are no scientifically backed answers to these questions (that I have found). The only answer would be that vitamin D intake (by sun or supplement) is a key. As to "trends of getting acne"... dark skin...it makes vitamin D intake by sun more difficult, but that can be overcome by more exposure or food/supplement so who knows who would get acne or why in this case...; people not getting enough sun...it is a calling card of the "Western" lifestyle that is so often cited on this forum for being responsible (by way of diet) for acne. We work indoors, we drive in a car (UVB doesn't readily penetrate glass) and we hardly get in the sun. When we do, we slather on the spf because dermatologists say we'll get skin cancer (this is all wrong too...consistent, non-burning exposure to sun creates vit D that protects you not only from breast and prostate cancer but also from skin cancer). All this because of a fear of the most survivable, treatable cancer of them all. Anyway...whether supplementing is the same as exposure...I don't know. I can't readily tell from available research (that I've found) but it is my only option (can't move to Africa). I know that vitamin D is created and self-limited by sun exposure to the skin. The skin is an organ with many purposes beyond keeping our insides in, and one of them is to produce vitamin D (and vitamin D and vitamin A share some important receptors--vitamin A is the derma holy grail, so thats intersting)...yet when dealing with skin disorders, vitamin D is hardly examined. It doesn't make sense to me.

However, on this forum there is some anecdotal evidence. I search posting histories and see that Winter is when people tend to say "Method X has failed me finally and I need to try something new" (p.s. B-5 is a precursor material to vit D). (Mind you, your body can store vit D for months, so you might not "run out" til December or even later if you had sun exposure in late Fall) Also I notice Danny(I think) for example has a regimen that includes eating wild salmon about everyday...this is a huge source of vit D (as the Northern indigenous peoples would have received their vit D from fish and the like). Many other clear members take fish oil or cod liver oil...also sources. Salmon was very popular in the top ten skin friendly foods. I think it might be helping people without their knowledge.

Well, I appreciate your response because I know you are a bright and thorough person in scrutinizing potential treatments and I would appreciate your additional thoughts on this.

(BTW, I started vitD a few days ago and will continue it regardless of results because I am convinced that most of the Western world is severely deficient in non-summer months, including myself. Anyway, I expect that if there will be results it could take 2 months, especially with regard to vit D's keratinocyte differentiation and nonproliferation and immuno activities). As for the insulin related activities, I am attacking that from many different angles right now, so vit D isjust another added to green tea and diet, etc.

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I agree, I've been planning on getting more vitamin d anyway because of being aware I don't get enough sun, and vitamin d deficiency is also associated with an increased risk of nearly all forms of cancer, and higher blood levels of vitamin d are associated with a lower chance of dying from any cause (I don't know how they figured that out! lol). So Vitamin D is definitely important, even aside from this insulin resistance issue. Adding this insulin resistance factor in is just one more reason, which is more closely acne-related than the others, for making sure to get enough vitamin d. So I will get some cod liver oil and see how it goes :) I have a vitamin d supplement on my fridge, but it seems that it made me break out when I took it last, about 6 months ago I think but it may have just been a mistaken association or coincidence, but I've been avoiding the supplement ever since then out of hesitation. That's one reason I was asking about the difference between food/supplement sources of vitamin d vs sun-generated vitamin d. For instance, can a vitamin d supplement "go bad" thereby causing a breakout?

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I agree, I've been planning on getting more vitamin d anyway because of being aware I don't get enough sun, and vitamin d deficiency is also associated with an increased risk of nearly all forms of cancer, and higher blood levels of vitamin d are associated with a lower chance of dying from any cause (I don't know how they figured that out! lol). So Vitamin D is definitely important, even aside from this insulin resistance issue. Adding this insulin resistance factor in is just one more reason, which is more closely acne-related than the others, for making sure to get enough vitamin d. So I will get some cod liver oil and see how it goes :) I have a vitamin d supplement on my fridge, but it seems that it made me break out when I took it last, about 6 months ago I think but it may have just been a mistaken association or coincidence, but I've been avoiding the supplement ever since then out of hesitation. That's one reason I was asking about the difference between food/supplement sources of vitamin d vs sun-generated vitamin d. For instance, can a vitamin d supplement "go bad" thereby causing a breakout?

You might want to do some online research. Theres too much for me to present here. But my bottom line: RDAs are way too low. I am taking 4000 IU per day in two doses. I take 2600 IU in the morning and 1400 IU in the afternoon (trying to simulate sun exposure...probably doesn't matter, but I'm weird like that). (I'll reduce or cut it out in the sunny months)

Furthermore, I fully expect to break out for the next month or so. Vit D is directly involved with reducing keratinocyte proliferation and with its differentiation. Which means it will hopefully reduce the hyperkeratinization and through the differentiation will improve their structure (sorry if I don't fullly grasp the sciency part, but this is my interpretation of some pretty heavy reading)...but that means the old deformed cells will be there even longer...I won't have a fresh crop of good cells for months I guess. But I don't mind. I NEED the vitamin D anyway and I'm breaking out anyway...so, whats a couple of months wait?

My bottom line is that I think this might actually be the "accutane" that nature intended. I'm pretty excited about it.

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A quick search on taurine and vitamin d found this:

The taurine conjugated form of bile salts improve vitamin d absorption, and

A vitamin d deficiency will impair the body's ability to produce taurine.

So if you're deficient in vitamin d, you're probably deficient in taurine, and that resultant taurine deficiency makes it harder for you to absorb vitamin d from your food.

Or, a taurine defiency from any other cause can result in a vitamin d deficiency if you rely primarily on food sources or supplements for your vitamin d.

Fortunately you can escape this downward spiral by getting your vitamin d from the sun primarily, or if you must rely on supplements make sure you take your vitamin d with taurine!

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or if you must rely on supplements make sure you take your vitamin d with taurine!

Thats my plan. I did my own indep. research on taurine before starting red bull and was impressed by the cell osmolarity regulation and figured my cells need all the help they can get now that I am putting good stuff and not bad stuff into my body. So right now I finish a red bull about 15 too 20 minutes before my d supplement (btw, I take calc with the d...part of my realizatiion re: vit d and my own history was that I had great skin while pregnant, but I was taking a calc supplement while pregnaant and it just so happens it was a calc+vit d.....that was when it really clicked for me. My skin started breaking out in grad school when I was indoors all the time. In undergrad Itook part of the summer off, but in grad school I loaded up all three terms, plus a job...I never saw the sun, then career and desk job...it all just clicked. I looked at the holistic clear club and most people do eat salmon+multivit (prob w/D)+fish oil). The only reason I haven't started a thread is that I am tired of sounding the alarm for eveery little theory and then theres just so much out there that no oneknows what to do. I thought I'd test itfirst. I'm even testing it with D, not fish oil, to eliminate vit A and isolated omegas as a possibility). sorry for gramm. and spelling..its llaaaate here.

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LiliVG: You mentioned that you would switch to a coenzyme B complex?

While still aiming at at complex 25 dosage.

I have found this co-enzymate B complex: http://www.super-smart.eu/article.pl?id=0040

But I can't really figure out what "dosage" it is? :)

So if you could help me out a bit...at first glance it does seem like a "25mg" ?

Secondly, does it contain all the B vitamins it's supposed to, aswell as no bad stuff?

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