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User47728

Fructose, Insulin, And Taurine!

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I receive about 300mcg of elemental chromium from the tablets per day

I do consume quite a but of sugar from biscuits but I don't drink soft drinks at all.

My diet is pretty much fruit for breakfast and lunch, anything for dinner and biscuits for snacks.

I drink about 2 drinkbottles of water per day and a few glasses of vegetable juice

I definitely think I consume too much sugar and I have tried avoiding sugar in the past but it has been extremely difficult for me. I have found that the restriction makes life seem very hard and eventually my willpower breaks.

I never drink alcohol

I know for sure that I have problems with my liver/metabolism/blood sugar levels/free radicals, etc because when I did a colon cleanse that involved a 10 day liquids only fast I was 100% clear

You sound a lot lot like me! Cutting out sugar is hard, but reducing sugar is a lot easier. My exact problem is fructose. Fructose cause me to have a lowered glucose tolerance, and absorbing enough glucose brings out the spots. If i avoid virtually all fructose i can tolerate some glucose. I also have a problem with glactose (milk sugar - lactose is made up of glucose & galactose) and the reason i can't have any milk or yoghurt. Cheese & Butter is fine. My advice would be

Cut out virtually all fructose (yes even fruit - fruit isn't healthy because it contains fructose it's healthy in spite of that - you may be able to handle a small amount of certain fruits but you can test that later).

Don't eat/serverly limit foods that contain the following: high fructose corn syrup (HFCS), honey, sugar, fruit juice (and even veg juice - depends on the sugar % as juice is always worse for sugar content), anything with fruit juice as sweetener (usually apple juice). Things with just glucose/dextrose in are ok in small quantities, but if in an ingredient ends in -ose and you don't know what it is avoid it.

Overall watch the amount of sugar content in everything you eat and don't over do it in any one meal. Hopefully you'll find a balance and know your upper limit, i have a rough idea of my own tolerance (even though sometimes i do slip up).

Cinnamon is a good whole food that helps with blood sugar, and 1/4 to 1/2 a teaspoon a day (in either my oat pancakes or porridge) definitely helps. So if your not already adding it i'd definitely recommend it. Cinnamon

If you have a sweet tooth - look out for some atkins snack foods (they do a crunch chocolate bar which has low fructose i believe) - just carefully read the ingredients and don't have to many! Oh and if you eat bread, try a low gi seed whole grain breed but don't have more than 3/4 slices a day.

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taurines good for body building too :}

is there a different between l-taurine and taurine?

im pretty sure most of my workout supplements pack l-taurine.

havn't been visiting this part of the forums for a while, looking to pick up twinlab max taurine at 1g a pill this afternoon :}

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I think we should do a tally of who has been helped by taurine to kind of start an official study going.

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taurines good for body building too :}

is there a different between l-taurine and taurine?

im pretty sure most of my workout supplements pack l-taurine.

havn't been visiting this part of the forums for a while, looking to pick up twinlab max taurine at 1g a pill this afternoon :}

Nope it's the same stuff

he "L" of L-Taurine stands for "levo" which means that, the groups at the lowest numbered asymmetric carbon atom are placed at the left - a description of the configuration of the molecular structure of Taurine. In other words: all Taurine is L-Taurine - the "L" is simply bonus information.

Luckily for us it's a well known and well tested body building supp and at the 3g a day level most of us should be fine with it.

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You know, I'm wondering about this l-taurine vs taurine thing because I read online that taurine is neither L nor D because it's not like the other amino acids and so it doesn't have a left or right inclination. So I don't know why it's labeled as "L-Taurine" because Taurine isn't supposed to be L or D.

http://www.3dchem.com/molecules.asp?ID=22

Most amino acids have a L- or D- configuration, which means the molecule when put into a solution will rotate light either to the left (Levo=L) or the right (Dextro = D). Taurine does not polarize light and consequently does not have an L- or D- configuration.
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Hi all,

I've been following this thread for some time now, and recently started implementing the suggested regimen with already quite some positive effects. :) However, I still have got some questions and I would really appreciate it if some of you could take some time to share their thoughts on this;

1] I'm taking 1000mg of Taurine with each meal (3x a day). Now, should I best take the Taurine 'about half an hour before', 'directly before', 'during', or 'directly after' the meal?

2] Should the cayenne powder capsules best be taking 'directly before', 'during' or 'directly after' each meal?

3] I also purchased the Betaine HCL but after more and more reading through this thread I'm not sure it's still a good idea to use it. Should I stick to the cayenne powder, alternate between the two, or even use Betaine HCL only?

4] Do you have any suggestions for nice low fructose snacks (/food)?

5] What about potatoe chips? Reading the packages (generally) suggests it doesn't contain any fructose, but I had some potatoe chips yesterday, and I have the feeling it resulted in some pimpels, even though I took some extra cayenne powder capsules as a precautionary measure...

Thanks a lot for this thread and for your insights!

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Hi all,

I've been following this thread for some time now, and recently started implementing the suggested regimen with already quite some positive effects. :) However, I still have got some questions and I would really appreciate it if some of you could take some time to share their thoughts on this;

1] I'm taking 1000mg of Taurine with each meal (3x a day). Now, should I best take the Taurine 'about half an hour before', 'directly before', 'during', or 'directly after' the meal?

2] Should the cayenne powder capsules best be taking 'directly before', 'during' or 'directly after' each meal?

3] I also purchased the Betaine HCL but after more and more reading through this thread I'm not sure it's still a good idea to use it. Should I stick to the cayenne powder, alternate between the two, or even use Betaine HCL only?

4] Do you have any suggestions for nice low fructose snacks (/food)?

5] What about potatoe chips? Reading the packages (generally) suggests it doesn't contain any fructose, but I had some potatoe chips yesterday, and I have the feeling it resulted in some pimpels, even though I took some extra cayenne powder capsules as a precautionary measure...

Thanks a lot for this thread and for your insights!

I'm so glad this regimen is helping you! :)

1)I tend to take taurine with meals because I just tend to remember it better that way, and I don't know if there's much difference as far as absorbability or effectiveness of taurine before meals, after, during, etc. Some say to take it on an empty stomach, but others say amino acids on an empty stomach will cause insulin spikes. But taurine isn't exactly like regular amino acids either, so I'm not sure about that. But I think taking taurine with meals is fine because ordinarily our taurine comes from food sources such as steak, so since it's absorbable in that form, I figure it's ok to take with meals.

2)I've read that cayenne should be taken directly before meals because it takes some time for the cayenne capsule to dissolve, releasing the cayenne, and then it takes some time for the stomach to start producing acid in response to the cayenne. My bottle of cayenne says to take it immediately before meals.

3)For me, Betaine HCL worked great initially, but then the effect started to taper off, and if I forgot to take one, I'd get horrible indigestion. I've found it's easiest on my stomach to just stick with cayenne, but theoretically if you alternate back and forth with cayenne and HCL the HCL shouldn't lower your own acid production. I wish I could take HCL at every meal, it worked so well initially, but the side effects are too uncomfortable for me if I forget or am unable to take it (like if I'm out and don't have it with me). So I use cayenne most of the time unless I've eaten something particularly allergenic that I know gives me problems, like nuts or chocolate for example.

4) Here are some things I eat as snacks:

- I usually keep hard boiled eggs on hand, those are a nice convenient snack. I put a hard boiled egg in an egg slicer, that makes it easier to eat. Egg salad (hard boiled eggs, mayo, salt, pepper) is another variation on that.

- Some here have said that cold meat makes a convenient snack if you have some in the fridge, like from a baked chicken or turkey if you made one.

- Radishes are good, I like those, though not everyone does, but they're good for digestion so I usually have them around.

- Nuts make a good snack if they don't give you problems. But many people find they do cause them skin problems, so you'll need to know whether they're a problem for you or not.

- Carrots and cucumbers with ranch dressing for dipping (as long as it doesn't have HFCS in it) is good, very yummy!

- Tuna salad (tuna, mayo, and a little lemon juice) on rice crackers is very yummy!

5) Potato chips are not high in fructose (though some varieties have more naturally occurring fructose than others. Red skin potatoes are the best for low fructose, and russets are the worst). But potato chips are problematic for other reasons than fructose. They are fried in vegetable oils which turns the oil into trans fats which are extremely inflammatory. Some companies say "No Trans fats" on the label because they didn't buy the oil as hydrogenated oil, they fried the chips in polyunsaturated vegetable oil like canola or soybean oil. But the problem is, by the time they finish frying the oil, the high temperatures have turned their previously trans-fat free oil into a trans-fat loaded oil. Polyunsaturated oils (which most vegetable oils are) is turned into trans fats at high temperatures. The fact that the potato chips are fried in vegetable oil at all means they have trans fats, regardless of whether that oil started as hydrogenated oil or not. Inflammatory foods are bad, you'll want to avoid them as much as possible.

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You know, I'm wondering about this l-taurine vs taurine thing because I read online that taurine is neither L nor D because it's not like the other amino acids and so it doesn't have a left or right inclination. So I don't know why it's labeled as "L-Taurine" because Taurine isn't supposed to be L or D.

http://www.3dchem.com/molecules.asp?ID=22

Most amino acids have a L- or D- configuration, which means the molecule when put into a solution will rotate light either to the left (Levo=L) or the right (Dextro = D). Taurine does not polarize light and consequently does not have an L- or D- configuration.

When I asked, it was the exact same thing. L- was just the form af amino acid binding.

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You know, I'm wondering about this l-taurine vs taurine thing because I read online that taurine is neither L nor D because it's not like the other amino acids and so it doesn't have a left or right inclination. So I don't know why it's labeled as "L-Taurine" because Taurine isn't supposed to be L or D.

http://www.3dchem.com/molecules.asp?ID=22

Most amino acids have a L- or D- configuration, which means the molecule when put into a solution will rotate light either to the left (Levo=L) or the right (Dextro = D). Taurine does not polarize light and consequently does not have an L- or D- configuration.

When I asked, it was the exact same thing. L- was just the form af amino acid binding.

It probably is the same thing, I can't find any mention anywhere of specifying a difference between the two terms.

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...

I'm so glad this regimen is helping you! :)

1)I tend to take taurine with meals because I just tend to remember it better that way, and I don't know if there's much difference as far as absorbability or effectiveness of taurine before meals, after, during, etc. Some say to take it on an empty stomach, but others say amino acids on an empty stomach will cause insulin spikes. But taurine isn't exactly like regular amino acids either, so I'm not sure about that. But I think taking taurine with meals is fine because ordinarily our taurine comes from food sources such as steak, so since it's absorbable in that form, I figure it's ok to take with meals.

2)I've read that cayenne should be taken directly before meals because it takes some time for the cayenne capsule to dissolve, releasing the cayenne, and then it takes some time for the stomach to start producing acid in response to the cayenne. My bottle of cayenne says to take it immediately before meals.

3)For me, Betaine HCL worked great initially, but then the effect started to taper off, and if I forgot to take one, I'd get horrible indigestion. I've found it's easiest on my stomach to just stick with cayenne, but theoretically if you alternate back and forth with cayenne and HCL the HCL shouldn't lower your own acid production. I wish I could take HCL at every meal, it worked so well initially, but the side effects are too uncomfortable for me if I forget or am unable to take it (like if I'm out and don't have it with me). So I use cayenne most of the time unless I've eaten something particularly allergenic that I know gives me problems, like nuts or chocolate for example.

4) Here are some things I eat as snacks:

- I usually keep hard boiled eggs on hand, those are a nice convenient snack. I put a hard boiled egg in an egg slicer, that makes it easier to eat. Egg salad (hard boiled eggs, mayo, salt, pepper) is another variation on that.

- Some here have said that cold meat makes a convenient snack if you have some in the fridge, like from a baked chicken or turkey if you made one.

- Radishes are good, I like those, though not everyone does, but they're good for digestion so I usually have them around.

- Nuts make a good snack if they don't give you problems. But many people find they do cause them skin problems, so you'll need to know whether they're a problem for you or not.

- Carrots and cucumbers with ranch dressing for dipping (as long as it doesn't have HFCS in it) is good, very yummy!

- Tuna salad (tuna, mayo, and a little lemon juice) on rice crackers is very yummy!

5) Potato chips are not high in fructose (though some varieties have more naturally occurring fructose than others. Red skin potatoes are the best for low fructose, and russets are the worst). But potato chips are problematic for other reasons than fructose. They are fried in vegetable oils which turns the oil into trans fats which are extremely inflammatory. Some companies say "No Trans fats" on the label because they didn't buy the oil as hydrogenated oil, they fried the chips in polyunsaturated vegetable oil like canola or soybean oil. But the problem is, by the time they finish frying the oil, the high temperatures have turned their previously trans-fat free oil into a trans-fat loaded oil. Polyunsaturated oils (which most vegetable oils are) is turned into trans fats at high temperatures. The fact that the potato chips are fried in vegetable oil at all means they have trans fats, regardless of whether that oil started as hydrogenated oil or not. Inflammatory foods are bad, you'll want to avoid them as much as possible.

Thanks a lot for taking the time to reply so thoroughly!! :surprised:

Some more questions came up though:

1] Is it advisable to take a little bit of Taurine and Cayenne powder when having a snack (especially when it's a more 'risky' snack)?

2] I understood from previous posts that you are specifically breaking out (a little bit) from amongst others peanut butter; Do you think that is mainly caused by the trans-fats in peanut butter, or is it because you're allergic to nuts to some extent?

3] I (naively) thought that the diet that accompanies this regimen just implied eliminating fructose (as much as possible). But hence I now understand the 'main' approach really should be like described in your signature; a general healthy diet, in which you additionally try to eliminate fructose as much as possible?

4] Should I also try to totally eliminate glucose? Or is not taking too large amounts at once OK as well?

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Thanks a lot for taking the time to reply so thoroughly!! :surprised:

Two more questions came up though:

1] Is it advisable to take a little bit of Taurine and Cayenne powder when having a snack (especially when it's a more 'risky' snack)?

2] I understood from previous posts that you are specifically breaking out (a little bit) from amongst others peanut butter; Do you think that is mainly caused by the trans-fats in peanut butter, or is it because you're allergic to nuts to some extent?

3] I (naively) thought that the diet that accompanies this regimen just implied eliminating fructose (as much as possible). But hence I now understand the 'main' approach really should be like described in your signature; a general healthy diet, in which you additionally try to eliminate fructose as much as possible?

4] Should I also try to totally eliminate glucose? Or is not taking too large amounts at once OK as well?

No problem! LiliVG, The Taurine Queen, at your service *bows* lol

1)I see no problem with doing that if you want. It certainly couldn't hurt :)

2)I think it's allergy related because other nuts break me out too, like almonds, but I don't think walnuts do (not sure though, I tend to avoid all nuts just to be on the safe side), so I think it's an allergy. That's why I take HCL with those specific foods I've noticed a non-sugar-related issue with. Inflammation in general causes a depletion in b-vitamins and taurine as well as increasing IL-6 which increases skin cell hyperproliferation, so avoiding sources of inflammation is important. That includes sugar, trans fats/hydrogenated oil, and allergens.

3) The primary focus is on refined sugars and sources of inflammation such as trans fats and allergens as much as possible, but considering how additive-laden processed food is, and how little we know about many of those additives, I personally stick with a whole food based diet to avoid unintended side effects of those chemicals, just for general health sake, not necessarily for treating acne. But it's possible some additive could exacerbate acne and it would take forever to pinpoint which one since there are so many ingredients on the label of many processed foods. So the whole foods diet is my way of simplifying things for myself, otherwise I'd have to be a modern day Sherlock Holmes of additives and it would be nearly impossible to know everything about every one of them. But definitely, a healthy diet in general is always a good idea regardless.

4)Glucose causes insulin spikes, which then increase the hormones IGF-1, which increased skin cell proliferation, and androgens, which increase sebum production. Since skin cell hyperproliferation, and excess sebum mixed causes pore plugs, the root of acne development, keeping insulin spikes to a minimum is important. So keeping glucose consumption low will help. You can also take a fiber supplement with something sweet to slow the sugar's entry rate into your blood stream, reducing the insulin spike.

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I found this report, which analyzed the sugar profiles of various fruit juices. From what I can see, all the fruit juices had more fructose than glucose in all cases. The only more common sugar was xylose, which I don't know much about, unless it's related to xylitol. If xylose is xylitol, I have no problem with that. But the chart is useful in that it shows that fruit juice is across the board very high in fructose, and has a fructose-dominant fructose/glucose ratio. This is why I do not promote drinking fruit juice. Whole fruit on the other hand is not usually fructose dominant except for a few exceptions such as apples and pears.

http://journal.kcsnet.or.kr/main/j_search/...spage=j_bkcs_01

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*snip*

I think it will be hard to make the flowchart look simple. Acne is really complicated!

Anyways I think the flowchart should be on the first post in this thread.

You can start a thread on that flow chart and that way you will be able to update it as ideas come to you, and I can link to your Flow Chart thread in the first post :) That way you have more control over your flow chart being up to date. Otherwise you'd have to send me a new flow chart when you made improvements and then wait for me to be logged on to update the attachment and that would just complicate things more than necessary. But I'd be happy to link to your flow chart thread on the first post :)

Thanks for the compliment lookingforacure. :D

As for the categorization, I'm thinking that to an extent that would be possible. Like for example, I color coded the cures to be green, that kind of thing. It's very difficult to lay out intuitively just because theres so many interconnected arrows; I have to make sure its possible to follow where they all go. But, I'll work on it.

I'll make a thread for it, too, and give you the link so I can change it without causing a hassle for you; I'll make it in a little while.

Finally, started taking taurine... I'll keep you posted with results.

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You know, I'm wondering about this l-taurine vs taurine thing because I read online that taurine is neither L nor D because it's not like the other amino acids and so it doesn't have a left or right inclination. So I don't know why it's labeled as "L-Taurine" because Taurine isn't supposed to be L or D.

http://www.3dchem.com/molecules.asp?ID=22

Most amino acids have a L- or D- configuration, which means the molecule when put into a solution will rotate light either to the left (Levo=L) or the right (Dextro = D). Taurine does not polarize light and consequently does not have an L- or D- configuration.

I think theres only 1 type of Taurine available. There are only L or D (unless it's a racemic like DL). I always thought levo & dextro were todo with carbon atoms

D- or L- Designation

The bonding pattern of the hydrogens and hydroxyl groups around each carbon atom is very important to the structure of carbohydrates. You should recall that a carbon atom which is bonded to four different groups is an asymmetric carbon atom.

Glucose, with six carbon atoms, has four asymmetric carbon atoms (marked in this diagram with *). The arrangement of the OH's and H's on these atoms is very important. Structural formulas for sugar molecules are often written in this vertical arrangement with the aldehyde or the ketone group at or near the top. When written in this particular way, the position of the OH on the last asymmetric carbon atom will tell us whether we are dealing with a "D" sugar or an "L" sugar. "D" stands for dextro and "L" stands for levo. If the OH is on the right, then we are dealing with a "D" sugar, in this case D-glucose.

Structure of glucose with asymmetric carbon atoms marked with *. [67037.jpg]

Each of these sugars is a "D" sugar because the OH on the last asymmetric carbon atom is written on the right. Therefore, D-galactose, D-glucose, and D-fructose. Had the OH group attached to the last asymmetric carbon atom been on the left, then these would have been "L" sugars. When you see D's and L's in front of the names of carbohydrates, this is the reason for it.

Structures of D-galactose, D-glucose and D-fructose. [67034.jpg]

Glucose Structure

I don't really know anything about taurine not polarizing light and consequently does not have an L- or D- configuration (i'm not sure what that has todo with last asymmetric carbon atom though) - but maybe it doesn't fit into either the L or the D category and there isn't any other category (scientists mess up too) - it a bit weird though, but i'm 99.9% sure theres only one type of Taurine. There are however, 3 ways i know of making it so your taurine made be from a different source/process - and i'm not sure how that effects the taurine (maybe quality/purity?)

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is xylitol as bad as fructose?

Not at all! Xylitol is a natural sugar substitute which doesn't require insulin for metabolism. It's a little less sweet than real sugar, but otherwise tastes the same and with no aftertaste. Xylitol is on the very top of my list of what I'd recommend for someone looking for a substitute for table sugar. I love it and use it all the time :)

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As an update to the whole birthday cake fiasco, my husband, who does not even have acne, got a pimple on his nose from eating that cake! lol. So I don't feel so bad about the three I got from it, lol. The two on my face are almost completely gone now (a little pinkness remaining, that's about it), and the one on my back is on it's way out too. Man, that cake was so bad it was able to give a pimple to someone who isn't even acne prone! My husband never had acne, not even as a teenager, and that cake got him! lol.

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Some more questions for this wonderful thread! :clap:

1] I'm currenlty taking a B-50 complex since this was the lowest b-complex I could find at my local stores. Would it be better to try to cut those tablets in half and take half a tablet a day, such that I'd be essentially taking a B-25 complex? Or in other words, does the 'overdose of 25' (when you're taking 50) have disadvantageous consequences, particularly with respect to the treatment of acne?

2] The only Cayenne powder capsules I could find at my local stores was one where the package says "each capsule contains 210mg Capsicum annuum, with minimal 0,1% capsaicine". I'm currently taking two of these capsules with each meal. The problem is that I have no idea how close this is to (the recommended) 40.000 HU of Cayenne powder. Nor the Internet, nor a telephone call with the producer of this specific Cayenne powder supplement has lead to an answer... So, do you know how much mg of Cayenne powder (or capsaicine) is equivalent to 40.000 HU. Am I currently taking the right dose?

3] And finally, I am quite sure I personally am dealing with a form of teen acne (as opposed to the 'more structural' 'adult' acne many others are suffering from). (I'm in puberty and without treatment my acne isn't 'really' bad.) Now I was wondering if someone could come up with a theory why it might be that this 'Taurine regimen' is actually also working for people like me, with teen acne. I mean, teen acne supposedly is a consequence of some hormonal deficiency, that again disappears as you become an adult. How can this be linked to Taurine? Does your body produce less Taurine (or maybe; 'does it need more Taurine') when you're in puberty? Maybe during puberty your hormonal deficiency causes breakouts from sugar and other inflammatories, which on its turn leads to a Taurine shortage after a while?

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Is it ok to take taurine when your on a b5 regimine of 10 grams per-day? I also take one tablet of b-complex.

B-5 interfers with taurine directly. The B-5 regimen and the Taurine regimen are completely incompatible.

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Some more questions for this wonderful thread! :clap:

1] I'm currenlty taking a B-50 complex since this was the lowest b-complex I could find at my local stores. Would it be better to try to cut those tablets in half and take half a tablet a day, such that I'd be essentially taking a B-25 complex? Or in other words, does the 'overdose of 25' (when you're taking 50) have disadvantageous consequences, particularly with respect to the treatment of acne?

2] The only Cayenne powder capsules I could find at my local stores was one where the package says "each capsule contains 210mg Capsicum annuum, with minimal 0,1% capsaicine". I'm currently taking two of these capsules with each meal. The problem is that I have no idea how close this is to (the recommended) 40.000 HU of Cayenne powder. Nor the Internet, nor a telephone call with the producer of this specific Cayenne powder supplement has lead to an answer... So, do you know how much mg of Cayenne powder (or capsaicine) is equivalent to 40.000 HU. Am I currently taking the right dose?

3] And finally, I am quite sure I personally am dealing with a form of teen acne (as opposed to the 'more structural' 'adult' acne many others are suffering from). (I'm in puberty and without treatment my acne isn't 'really' bad.) Now I was wondering if someone could come up with a theory why it might be that this 'Taurine regimen' is actually also working for people like me, with teen acne. I mean, teen acne supposedly is a consequence of some hormonal deficiency, that again disappears as you become an adult. How can this be linked to Taurine? Does your body produce less Taurine (or maybe; 'does it need more Taurine') when you're in puberty? Maybe during puberty your hormonal deficiency causes breakouts from sugar and other inflammatories, which on its turn leads to a Taurine shortage after a while?

1) I don't know if taking a higher b complex would in itself cause problems. I just don't think that that much is really necessary, and splitting it in half would make your supplement last twice as long. There are a few people taking a b-50 and a few taking b-25, and I haven't noticed a correlation in success rates with the b complex amounts being different.

2) The Cayenne I have is 450 mgs of 40,000H at .25 percent capsaicin. But on the bottle is says taking twice as much doesn't make it 80,000HU instead of 40,000HU. So honestly I don't really understand the measuring system for cayenne. I wish I could be more helpful than that, but I need to look into that more. From the amounts you gave though, it looks like you get about twice as much capsaicin as my 40,000HU capsules, so I guess it's about the same as my 100,000HU capsules? I'm not really sure.

3) According to scientists and researchers, puberty and pregnancy are both conditions of insulin resistance (link). That is why diabetes can develop spontaneously during pregnancy. Puberty and pregnancy are also both known for being plagued with acne. Since taurine increases insulin sensitivity, I believe this is one of the major ways that taurine works for acne. That's also why avoiding sugar and fructose is such a key factor in this regimen. It is possible however, that there is some other mechanism entirely at work, and we just don't know what it is yet. But that's my theory for now. Taurine is also naturally anti-inflammatory, so that's an added benefit in helping reduce the inflammation typical of acne lesions.

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Update on high doses of taurine for flakiness: It's only been two days completed of taking 6-7 grams of taurine per day, and it could be just a coincidence, but it seems there's a huge improvement already. It may be premature or a coincidence, but so far so good! :)

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Whole fruit on the other hand is not usually fructose dominant except for a few exceptions such as apples and pears.

Do you recommend not to eat apples? Like 1 apple a day? They are anti inflammatory. I would like to have an apple in the green smoothies along with some vegetables.

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Whole fruit on the other hand is not usually fructose dominant except for a few exceptions such as apples and pears.

Do you recommend not to eat apples? Like 1 apple a day? They are anti inflammatory. I would like to have an apple in the green smoothies along with some vegetables.

Lots of other fruits and vegetables are anti inflammatory too, and they have much less fructose in them. But this has been a point of disagreement because many think that apples are specifically an anti-acne food, probably because of that 3-day acne cure ebook that's floating around. No food is 100% good or 100% bad, I think it will depend on your sensitivities, and also how much sugar is in your diet as a whole from other foods as well. For instance if your diet is very low sugar/low carb in general, an apple probably won't hurt you. But on a high sugar diet, an apple is just adding to the sugar problem, so it'll depend.

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...

1) I don't know if taking a higher b complex would in itself cause problems. I just don't think that that much is really necessary, and splitting it in half would make your supplement last twice as long. There are a few people taking a b-50 and a few taking b-25, and I haven't noticed a correlation in success rates with the b complex amounts being different.

2) The Cayenne I have is 450 mgs of 40,000H at .25 percent capsaicin. But on the bottle is says taking twice as much doesn't make it 80,000HU instead of 40,000HU. So honestly I don't really understand the measuring system for cayenne. I wish I could be more helpful than that, but I need to look into that more. From the amounts you gave though, it looks like you get about twice as much capsaicin as my 40,000HU capsules, so I guess it's about the same as my 100,000HU capsules? I'm not really sure.

3) According to scientists and researchers, puberty and pregnancy are both conditions of insulin resistance (link). That is why diabetes can develop spontaneously during pregnancy. Puberty and pregnancy are also both known for being plagued with acne. Since taurine increases insulin sensitivity, I believe this is one of the major ways that taurine works for acne. That's also why avoiding sugar and fructose is such a key factor in this regimen. It is possible however, that there is some other mechanism entirely at work, and we just don't know what it is yet. But that's my theory for now. Taurine is also naturally anti-inflammatory, so that's an added benefit in helping reduce the inflammation typical of acne lesions.

Am I not taking a (far) too low dose of Cayenne powder...?? :eh: 2 capsules of 210mg, with 0,1% of capsaicin, makes about 0,42mg of capsaicin per 'dose'. In contrast, one capsule of your 0.25% 450mg implies about 1,125mg capsaicin per 'dose'. Hence, my 'dose' is -although I am taking 2 capsules a time- almost 3 times less than 'your dose'...

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