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Too much carbohydrate shuts down testosterone level control

http://www.physorg.com/news113902673.html

"Too much sugar turns off gene that controls the effects of sex steroids"...

"Glucose and fructose are metabolized in the liver. When there's too much sugar in the diet, the liver converts it to lipid. Using a mouse model and human liver cell cultures, the scientists discovered that the increased production of lipid shut down a gene called SHBG (sex hormone binding globulin), reducing the amount of SHBG protein in the blood. SHBG protein plays a key role in controlling the amount of testosterone and estrogen that's available throughout the body."

"If there's less SHBG protein, then more testosterone and estrogen will be released throughout the body, which is associated with an increased risk of acne, infertility, polycystic ovaries, and uterine cancer in overweight women. Abnormal amounts of SHBG also disturb the delicate balance between estrogen and testosterone, which is associated with the development of cardiovascular disease, especially in women."

"The discovery dispels the earlier assumption that too much insulin reduces SHBG, a view which arose from the observation that overweight, pre-diabetic individuals have high levels of insulin and low levels of SHBG. This new study proves that insulin is not to blame and that it's actually the liver's metabolism of sugar that counts."

(In spite of the article saying sugar, it doesn't seem to be a specific mechanism due to sugar, it looks like any excess carbohydrate would do this.)

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Like I always say with diet related issues, if this were true surely every one with high carbs would have acne?

If acne were diet related 75% of the population would have it. Look at these big obesse 50st people they make documentarys about. They have awful diets but no acne.

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Like I always say with diet related issues, if this were true surely every one with high carbs would have acne?

If acne were diet related 75% of the population would have it. Look at these big obesse 50st people they make documentarys about. They have awful diets but no acne.

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actually, it would largely come down to how well your liver is able to metabolize sugar so no, it isnt all about how much carbs you eat but how the individual processes them

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actually, it would largely come down to how well your liver is able to metabolize sugar so no, it isnt all about how much carbs you eat but how the individual processes them

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actually, it would largely come down to how well your liver is able to metabolize sugar so no, it isnt all about how much carbs you eat but how the individual processes them

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The other implication of this is that eating lots of carbs probably makes you randy.

High carbs -> low SHBG -> high test -> high DHT

high DHT is believed to increase sex drive...

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actually glucose is almost never converted to lipid unless you are eating in caloric excess. Otherwise it gets stored as glycogen whose stores are almost impossible to fill up

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actually glucose is almost never converted to lipid unless you are eating in caloric excess. Otherwise it gets stored as glycogen whose stores are almost impossible to fill up

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I have problems with two statements made on that Web page. This is the first one: "SHBG protein plays a key role in controlling the amount of testosterone and estrogen that’s available throughout the body." That may well be true for women, but I find it difficult to believe that it's true for men. That's because the main regulator of testosterone and its effects in men must surely be the HPT (hypothalmic-pituitary-testicular) axis, not the production of SHBG per se. Even if SHBG were to be reduced for the dietary reason mentioned in that article (increased consumption of carbohydrates), it seems clear that the brain would see the increased androgenic activity and then send the chemical signals to the testes to REDUCE the synthesis of testosterone, as a means of compensation. Women, on the other hand, have no similar feedback control of androgen production, so I _can_ see that as a reasonable theory for women.

The other statement I have a problem with is this one: "This discovery reinforces public health advice to eat complex carbohydrates and avoid sugar." The complexity of carbohydrates has nothing to do with how fast they turn into sugar. ALL carbs will do that quite rapidly, unless they are eaten with other food elements which slow that process down (like fat, soluble fiber, or protein).

.

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I have problems with two statements made on that Web page. This is the first one: "SHBG protein plays a key role in controlling the amount of testosterone and estrogen that’s available throughout the body." That may well be true for women, but I find it difficult to believe that it's true for men. That's because the main regulator of testosterone and its effects in men must surely be the HPT (hypothalmic-pituitary-testicular) axis, not the production of SHBG per se. Even if SHBG were to be reduced for the dietary reason mentioned in that article (increased consumption of carbohydrates), it seems clear that the brain would see the increased androgenic activity and then send the chemical signals to the testes to REDUCE the synthesis of testosterone, as a means of compensation. Women, on the other hand, have no similar feedback control of androgen production, so I _can_ see that as a reasonable theory for women.

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actually glucose is almost never converted to lipid unless you are eating in caloric excess. Otherwise it gets stored as glycogen whose stores are almost impossible to fill up

Right. Unless you have insulin resistance; I think I'm right in saying that even inactivity can trigger insulin resistance.

I don't agree that the stores are impossible to fill up, where does the glucose ultimately go? So far as I know, skeletal muscles, the brain or the liver converts it into triglycerides are the main routes.

You can probably also have problems if you're not well hydrated, glycogen needs water for storage; I would guess the fat route needs less water.

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probably not many but the point i was trying to make is that high sugar/carbohydrate intake shouldnt be blamed for excess lipid production

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probably not many but the point i was trying to make is that high sugar/carbohydrate intake shouldnt be blamed for excess lipid production

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That's not the question, the question is whether high (mainly) fructose/sucrose intake is to blame for high testosterone, (and presumably hence leading to more DHT production, and hence to acne.)

This research seems to say yes.

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That's not the question, the question is whether high (mainly) fructose/sucrose intake is to blame for high testosterone, (and presumably hence leading to more DHT production, and hence to acne.)

This research seems to say yes.

I just don't buy that theory, at least in the specific case of men, because the production of androgen is monitored and tightly controlled by the brain (at least in men). I just don't think you can make significant changes to the level of testosterone in your (male) body merely by picking and choosing which foods you eat! :)

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I just don't buy that theory, at least in the specific case of men, because the production of androgen is monitored and tightly controlled by the brain (at least in men). I just don't think you can make significant changes to the level of testosterone in your (male) body merely by picking and choosing which foods you eat! :)

And perhaps it doesn't go up much, is that actually the question? Perhaps this isn't about levels, it's about destination. Where does the body put testosterone if it's not being taken out of the body by the liver? The absolute level may well not go up much, if any, but the route is different.

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I just don't buy that theory, at least in the specific case of men, because the production of androgen is monitored and tightly controlled by the brain (at least in men). I just don't think you can make significant changes to the level of testosterone in your (male) body merely by picking and choosing which foods you eat! :)

And perhaps it doesn't go up much, is that actually the question? Perhaps this isn't about levels, it's about destination. Where does the body put testosterone if it's not being taken out of the body by the liver? The absolute level may well not go up much, if any, but the route is different.

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so according to your theory all we have to do is stop drinking soda and anything with fructose in it and our acne will magically disappear. Thats obviously not true bro otherwise people on low carb diets, etc. would never have acne

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so according to your theory all we have to do is stop drinking soda and anything with fructose in it and our acne will magically disappear. Thats obviously not true bro otherwise people on low carb diets, etc. would never have acne

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I personally eat very little fructose in my diet . Not because it has any impact on my acne but because it is useless, cannot be stored as muscle glycogen and floods your liver which has to process it.

As for the vitamin A aspect you would be better off using a vitamin A supplement such as fish liver oil. beta carotene is not vitamin a and the only way for beta carotene to be converted to vitamin A is in the presence of bile salts, which means that you must eat fat alongside the carotenes to stimulate bile secretion. Aditionally people with diabtes or hypothyroidism convert it very poorly. Also the bodies conversion of beta carotene to vitamin A is not very efficient as it takes about 6 units betacarotene to make one unit vit. A.This means for example that a sweet potato (containing about 25,000 units of beta-carotene) will only convert into about 4,000 units of vitamin A (assuming you ate it with fat, are not diabetic and do not have thyroid problems).

Also, to theoretically produce a powerful enough accutane-like effect it should be taken in doses of around 150,000 IU - 300,000 IU. Of course there will be the haters out there who want to talk about toxicity, but the fact is accutane is far more dangerous than megadosing vitamin a (even though i also think accutane warnings are highly exaggerated). There have been studies done of people taking 300,000 units of vitamin A for a year with no adverse side effects

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I just don't buy that theory, at least in the specific case of men, because the production of androgen is monitored and tightly controlled by the brain (at least in men). I just don't think you can make significant changes to the level of testosterone in your (male) body merely by picking and choosing which foods you eat! :)

And perhaps it doesn't go up much, is that actually the question? Perhaps this isn't about levels, it's about destination. Where does the body put testosterone if it's not being taken out of the body by the liver? The absolute level may well not go up much, if any, but the route is different.

Any androgen molecules that don't end up binding to androgen receptors in various tissues around the body will eventually be metabolized in the liver and excreted in the urine. I'm not sure what point you're trying to make.

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:rolleyes: If it's not taken out, then more of it binds to the androgen receptors.

Yes, and the more of it that binds to androgen receptors, the more the brain lowers the production of additional testosterone, which is what I've been trying to explain to you. In other words, the brain keeps a close vigil on the amount of circulating androgen, and maintains that level to a pretty close tolerance.

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