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I bought Mederma a few weeks back and tried putting on my scars twice a day... but it seemed to dry my skin out A LOT and it would feel very tender, and then I would have this splotchy blush wherever I had applied it.

But I was wondering if anyone else had tried it... maybe I was putting it on wrong?

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i tried it one time...but i had found out that the way it works for other types of scars is by stopping the production of collagen in the applied area, therefore leveling out raised scars.

but thats a contraindication for using it on depressed scars...because depressed scars are a lack of collagen i think. therefore it could make them worse?

i really dont know but thats what i heard so i stopped using it. waste of money really

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I'm using mederma on an open wound scar that i got from hitting my head on my car door 3 weeks ago (on the bridge of my nose right between the eyes...sucks). I used neosporin and a bandaid for the first week, mederma for the last two. I haven't seen any skin drying, if anything, it's the gel crusting up and flaking off, not my skin. I think I see subtle improvement each morning, but that could be natural healing, ya never know.

I'm going to to see the derm today about other things, but i'll ask about the depressed/keloid scar issue. right now my scar is looking like a depressed ridge about a half inch wide.

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i tried it and it made me itch BAD. i think i got a rash from it too.

i read an article from a doctor and she was talkin about it. she said she gets mixed opinions from the people she works with. some swear by it, some think it's useless. i think in general, she said if it's going to work, it's probably gonna work for the newer scars

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i tried it one time...but i had found out that the way it works for other types of scars is by stopping the production of collagen in the applied area, therefore leveling out raised scars.

but thats a contraindication for using it on depressed scars...because depressed scars are a lack of collagen i think. therefore it could make them worse?

i really dont know but thats what i heard so i stopped using it. waste of money really

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rabbits were killed so we could have an answer:

Effect of Mederma on hypertrophic scarring in the rabbit ear model.

[My paper] Alexandrina S Saulis , Jon H Mogford , Thomas A Mustoe

Currently accepted conservative treatments of hypertrophic scars are limited to steroid injections, radiation therapy, and silicone occlusive therapy. However, the use of Mederma for these problematic lesions has become quite prevalent in the clinical setting. Little scientific evidence exists to support the efficacy of this product in reducing hypertrophic scars. The aim of this study was to study the effects of Mederma on hypertrophic scars in the rabbit hypertrophic scar model, allowing the histologic quantification of scar elevation, dermal collagen organization, vascularity, and inflammation and the gross examination of scar erythema. Full-thickness wounds down to cartilage, four per ear, were created in four New Zealand White rabbits, for a total of 32 scars. Twenty-eight days after the initial wounding, the hypertrophic scars were photographed, and treatment of half of the scars on each ear was begun with Mederma three times per day for a total of 4 weeks. The untreated scars served as control scars and were left exposed to air. After 4 weeks of treatment, the scars were once again photographed. The rabbits were then killed, and the scars were analyzed histologically. The pretreatment and posttreatment photographs were compared by using computer quantification of magenta, yellow, and cyan expression within the scars.Histologic analysis demonstrated no significant reduction in scar hypertrophy or scar elevation index. However, a significant improvement in dermal collagen organization was noted on comparing Mederma-treated scars with untreated control scars (p < 0.05). No significant difference in dermal vascularity or inflammation was noted. Computer analysis of the scar photographs demonstrated no significant reduction in scar erythema with Mederma treatment. The active product in Mederma, allium cepa, has as its derivative quercetin, a bioflavonoid noted for its antiproliferative effects on both normal and malignant cells, and its antihistamine release effects. These properties could theoretically prove beneficial in reversing the inflammatory and proliferative responses noted in hypertrophic scars. Despite the authors' inability to demonstrate a reduction in scar hypertrophy, the improvement in collagen organization noted in the Mederma-treated scars suggests it may have an effect on the pathophysiology of hypertrophic scar formation.

Mesh-terms: Animals; Cicatrix, Hypertrophic, pathology; Collagen, metabolism; Ear, External, pathology; Female; Onions; Phytotherapy; Plant Extracts, pharmacology; Rabbits; Skin, drug effects; Skin, pathology; Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Wound Healing, drug effects;

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There have been a few topics about mederma and the concensus is generally the same each time. It doesn't do anything for old scars, it does nothing for acne scars and can make them worse. Is best used for atrophic scars that are relatively recent.

If you use the search function you will find the other mederma topics, where people will go into more detail about their experiences.

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