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Addie

Relieving irritation/redness

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It's never been determined exactly what my red facial and neck blotches are, but they've mostly gotten better as my acne has gotten better. However, today the one around my nose and mouth started burning more than I could take (because of heat, sweat, Duac, and sunscreen), so I tried a little hydrocortisone on it. (This has been counterproductive in the past.) It actually calmed it down longer than anything else ever does.

I was wondering if that means anything. Or if there's a better long term solution that could mimic that effect. Hopefully it will just fade more over time . . . but I was still wondering . . .

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If you find something let me know too. I have dermititis and it is the only thing that helps keep it under control. I got mine from the dr. but it is not as strong as the otc ones. Also I read where neosporin is just as good. So far its been doing well. Elf

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is it in ointment form or did you get some kind of other form?(perhaps a cream?)

I am sort of afraid to put ointments on my face because they seem really pore-clogging

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It's a cream. It's never broken me out, but I haven't tried an ointment. Neosporin helps with pain, but not itchiness for me. :(

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Becareful!!! Putting cortisone (which is a steroid) on your skin more than a few weeks time can start to cause serious skin problems. Steroids thin the skin and can cause Rosacea (permanent reddened skin). Very short term use is fine, but there are lots of people who've used it longer and then got Rosacea.

Just wanted you to know.

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Yeah . . . that's why I started this thread, even though I didn't state it explicitly . . . and why I've rarely tried to use hydrocortisone, even if I wanted to scratch my face off . . . :(

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Hey I tried hydrocortisone for 3 days and it made my face more red than normal, now it seems its been that way for about a day or two after I quit using it. Id just stick with petroleum jelly thats wut I use and so far so good.

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I gave Neosporin another stab last night. It did kinda numb me out, so I was more comfortable, but it didn't do anything for the redness, which also doesn't matter much at night anyway.

The Eucerin Redness Relief spot treatment I tried today actually helped a lot with the discomfort and some with the redness. Unfortunately, I forgot this product is essentially soothing makeup. Layers of my skin flake off with any tactile contact. They keep flaking until the hole is deep enough to bleed. This sucks for makeup application: I have to touch my skin to apply the makeup and now the flakes are colored, no longer a translucent white. So, I'm going to be returning this product, but it might be very helpful to someone who's skin isn't suicidal. It might have fully covered the redness, too, if I could've layered it at all.

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since how long u been suffering frm dermatitis, coz even i think i have dermatitis its been 6mnths my skin stays dry and flaky during the day and oily in the evenings my nose stays pink all the time ive shown to many derms they say ive got seboherric dermatitis( i dnt have dandruff) finally ive found the right derm she's prescribed me a mild hydrocortisone cream and elidel cream i was jus wondering if any of u guys have tried this elidel cream... Does hydrocortisone cream help reduce redness???

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DO NOT use that stuff on your face, seriously. It can cause a sort of dependency, whereby your face flares up horribly and burns whemever you don't use it. Trust me, I know. It's taken about three months of not using it to get over the burning sensation. The withdrawal is horrible and antibiotics are required to see you through it.

Don't use it! Even doctors and dermatologists will tell you it's fine; it's not. Don't use it.

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hydrocortisone is safe,thats why it is over the counter med.

Unfort for atopic dermatitis (which sounds like what you have) there really isn't anything.

So unless your allergic to hdro it should be fine.

Hydrocortisone is very very mild millions of ppl use it effectively ,you just have to know how to use it don't exceed more than 5-7 unless your doc tells you to & apply thinly.Usually hydro is v mild for treating more stubborn dermatitis but if it works for you its great.

I have been using lower-med potent steroids -cutivate cream for years (5-10 days max) which is much stronger than hydro.Cutivate is used on babies for 1 month straight and its safe,so considering that hydro is nothing,just dont exceed 10 days on face unless ur doc tells u to.

If you have itching or inflammation u can always use hdro,just be a bit careful don't use it as an every day regimen,your inflammation and itching should go down by 7 days otherwise u need a bit more potent steroid.

There are med like elidel and protopic but these med once considered safe & big break through for dermatitis is now being thoroughly tested as there have been many cancer reports when used long term and now they have the black box warning.

remember there is no cure to atopic dermatitis it is bound to come back later steriods are just to keep it in control.

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If you're not using hydrocortisone excessively and you're following your doc's orders you should be fine.

If you're using it longer than a week at a time, using a thick layer, etc, do kindly look up 'overuse of hydrocortisone' on these boards. You'll find some lovely pictures that show what can happen. Or just Google Image it.

Nothing is safe if it is used incorrectly.

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If you have red blotches around your mouth, it could be perioral dermatitis. I have it very mildly (hardly noticable) but it burns and is irritating. It doesn't look as bad as in the pictures you can find through google. But if you have perioral dermatitis, don't use any steroid creams on your face! It temporarily helps but after a while it gets worse and then you're 'addicted' to the cream. Discontinuing will make it worse as well, but after a few days discontinuing it usually gets better.

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^ Oh, wow! That looks just like me! It used to go all the way down my neck, too, though. :( And the burning and itching is NOT mild. Since the article says oral antibiotics are used to treat it, I wonder if the minocycline I'm taking for acne has been what has calmed it down some. I've also noticed that it helps to wash my face immediately after brushing my teeth.

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bonobogirl since how long uve been experiencing this buring and itching is minocycline helpful coz even my derm has asked me to start. what else do u do for ur dermatitis?
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I've definitely been experiencing it since I was 11, and I'm 23 now, so for the last 12 years. (I specifically remember problems at 11, but it's fuzzy before then.)

I've never been diagnosed with dermatitis or anything else regarding it. When I've asked docs about it, they've said to stop using sunscreen and/or my current cleanser at the time and/or my current toothpaste at the time. (I've addressed all 3 of those issues many times, but to no avail.) When I talked about the correlation between its severity and heat or allergen/irritant levels, they just expressed their sympathy. :wall: There's also a correlation with anxiety, but I haven't brought that up with anyone yet.

I'm prescribed minocycline for acne. I was just guessing it might be helping, since the crap around my mouth, nose, and chin has gotten significantly better. I've been on minocycline since around April and was on tetracycline for about a month before that.

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This question doesn't really pertain to hydrocortisone, but about a week ago I got a zit on my cheek, so I spot treated with finacea for a few nights. Then when it started to go down I dabbed on Savlon (which is like Aussie Neosporin) to aid with the healing. Now, this usually really helps to speed up the lifespan of my zits, but for some reason I have a penny-sized circle of red on my skin, exactly where I put the Savlon.

It seriously looks like a perfectly circle-shaped sunburn or something. I don't know why this could have happened because I use Savlon all the time and only this time did it leave a burn (?) mark where it touched my skin. I've been putting Aloe Vera gel on the red spot and it's fading slooooowly, but I just wanna know what caused it so I can prevent it in the future.

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I know nothing of Savlon, but I know some things need to build up in your system before they cause an allergic reaction. (Like "the straw that broke the camel's back".)

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Well, I looked it up, this gives you an idea of what to do with it now.

Good luck! :)http://www.aocd.org/skin/dermatologic_dise..._dermatiti.html

A dermatologist diagnoses perioral dermatitis by examination. No other tests are usually done. The first step in treating perioral dermatitis is to discontinue all topical steroid creams, even non-prescription hydrocortisone. Once the steroid cream is discontinued, the rash appears and feels worse for days to weeks before it starts to improve. Heavy face creams should also be stopped. One must resist the temptation to apply any of these creams to the face when this happens. Think of the face as a cream junkie that needs a "fix"- one needs to go "cold-turkey".

A mild soap or soap substitute, such as Dove or Cetaphil should be used for washing. Scrubbing should be avoided. Try stopping fluorinated toothpaste for stubborn cases. Non-fluorinated toothpaste is available at a health food store. The most reliably effective treatment is oral antibiotics. These are taken in decreasing doses for three to twelve weeks. Topical antibacterial creams and lotions may also be used for faster relief. These can be continued for several months in order to prevent recurrences.

Even after successful treatment, perioral dermatitis sometimes comes back later. Usually, the same type treatment will again be effective. Many cases that come back eventually turn into rosacea. Perioral dermatitis is a common skin problem, but fortunately most people do very well with proper treatment.

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Periorial dermatitis seems to have a totally diff type of approach.I think it it is imp you ask your doc if it is atopic dermatitis,seborherrheic,eczema cause this has a totally diff type of treatment and is the most common type of skin prob to what you are mentioning.Since its all around the face and neck i doubt its perorial derm. but pls make sure before any treatment ,you are risking our face after all you dont want to leave it till it gets totally damaged nor do u wanna use products that can damage you more.

you can have a look here what is atopic dermatitis and how its treated

http://www.njc.org/disease-info/diseases/a...ons/eczema.aspx

and this site has all the info you need on AD

> http://dermatology.about.com/cs/eczemaderm.../atopicderm.htm

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(As an update: I haven't used hydrocortisone, since I last posted on here about it.)

This all is a definite balancing act for me, since I'm almost clear after severe acne thanks to minocycline, Duac, and Tazorac. The irritation I experience now sucks, but tends not to keep me up at night, night after night, with pain like 70% of my face being covered in networks of cysts did. Right now, I'm just trying to work around the acne meds.

I've definitely seen an improvement since starting the Paula's Choice products in my sig and Complex 15, so hopefully it's due to the anti-irritant ingredients (And antioxidants? Maybe? Dunno if I buy that, yet.), so hopefully the improvement keeps up. If there's still improvement after a month or more, I'll definitely recommend them to you guys.

Actually, I've found a lot of products and behaviors that help with hypersensitive skin/skin sensitized by acne meds/allergies/who knows what that might help some people out there over the years, so here's my list:

1) Be anal about cleaning. I beyond suck at organizing, but am hypervigilant about things that could harbor mold, dust, and allergens. Ideally, someone else would give you a hand at this cleaning, since it will flare your symptoms like all hell while you're doing it, but I've never been that lucky. I just do it as quickly as possible, then sprint to an ice cold shower, eye drops, ear cleaning (yeah, it's that bad), forced coughing/nose blowing, cold glasses of water, and a snack. (Water and snack to relieve throat irritation.) Ironically, cleaning agents tend to freak my body (and yours?) out, too.

2) Along the same lines, use clean sheets, pillowcases, and towels everyday. Be a bastard and only use paper towels for face and hand drying. (And body drying, if skin is over-the-top sensitive that day.)

3) Clean pet areas very often. PM me if you want specific advise on keeping rats/rat areas clean. Little buggers.

4) Avoid places that involve a lot of smoke or fragrances. (Like bars, if indoor smoking isn't banned in your city/state, candle shops, detergent and bug spray isles of grocery stores . . . )

5) OTC antihistamines (Benadryl, Claritin). I personally have a crappy reaction to them, but they are quite helpful for their actual purpose.

6) RX antihistamines. Ditto for me.

7) Avoid heat/sweating like the plague. (Anybody else up for immigration to Siberia with me? I got an A in Introductory Russian I . . . )

8) Also along that vein, keep the temperature in your living area as cool as you can stand.

9) Dry off any sweat as quickly as possible.

10) Beware of sunscreens. I've had sensitivity problems with almost everyone I've tried. I'm currently fairly certain I'm not sensitive to octinoxate and titanium dioxide; I'm fairly certain I am sensitive to avobenzone. Zince oxide is relatively safe for most people, too. (I've heard it might be comedogenic, though.) I had a bad reaction to a sunscreen with it in it, but can't separate whether that was due to an inactive ingredient or the zince oxide.

11) The occasional use of hydrocortisone cream.

12) Vaseline and Aquaphor. (Aquaphor breaks me out, but I don't think that's a problem for most people.)

13) Aveeno (unscented) and Eucerin lotions. Aveeno eventually felt greasy to me, so I use Eucerin now. Specifically, the Calming Creme Daily Moisturizer and Daily Replenishing Lotion. But, avoid their (or any) products with menthol.

14) Nix the fabric softener.

15) Avoid fragrance and dyes like the plague.

16) Aloe vera gel. I use generic FOTE.

17) Jojoba oil. I use Desert Essence, since it dispenses in drops.

18) Soothe eyedrops. Don't be scared of the mineral oil; just don't use too much or you'll taste it.

19) Icing.

20) Religious exfoliation and moisturization.

21) Dan's cleanser as a face and body wash. I'm guessing it's the absence of dyes and fragrance and presence of anti-irritants.

22) Avoid products with sodium lauryl/laureth sulfate in them.

23) Specifically looking for hygienic products with anti-irritants in them.

24) Keeping very clean. I'm most comfortable at 3 showers per day, but currently only take 2 because of convenience/facial issues. I think it helps to wash off all the sweat, irritants, and allergens.

^ Those are in no particular order.

Some anti-irritant ingredients are: bisbolol, lidochalone, willow herb extract, allantoin, sage extract, cucumber extract, white oak bark extract, and chamomile flower extract.

Unfortunately, all of these together still don't cut it for me, which is why I'm still searching for yet more tricks. :(

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thanks for the list ,all of them are problematic for most of us.I think it is imp for ppl themselves to find out what is causing them problems and if you can cut that out it can be very helpful to control.

I think most of us have someway or the other have exp contact dermtatitis ,applying anything too much flare us up.Ive had the exp with sunblock & harsh cleansers,i used to put sunblock on religiously every 2nd hour 2-3 times everyday and because of that ive had 2 terrible eczema flareups & about 3-4 due to harsh cleansers ,my whole outer layer peeled and had infection ,pls be careful of this ,the brand doesnt matter its how you treat your skin the amount it can take.

I know mine is from poor diet which flares me up & my dad has them so there isnt much i can do.Proper diet helps me alot. As far as i know there is a chance one day this will all go away by itself & this is not some fantasy of mine but our immune system may not be over reacting and be steady.

this is a really nice read if anyone interested about SD

http://ezinearticles.com/?Home-Remedy-for-...s&id=634123

and here is a link for diff type of things u can take if you dont wanna try the usual ways of treating SD/Atopic derm.

http://www.geocities.com/mall_lago/

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