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I've searched through the archives looking into info on white scars / hypopigmentation and I haven't found a lot of information or advice. I'm hoping to open up the floor to hear from a lot of people about experiences with / treatments for this type of scarring.

I know I can't be alone in having this type of scarring. I'm talking about smooth white scars where the pigment is essentially lost. They are generally kind of smooth and hard, and feel different than nnormal skin when you touch them. I've heard this type of scarring termed as "hypopigmentation."

Personally, I have this type of scarring all over my back and chest, which creates an uneven and mottled look. So far -- and it's been over 5 years -- I've found no effective treatment. I've tried, with varying degrees of seriousness: Mederma, Retin A, microdermabrasion.

I visited a dermatologist recently, hoping to explore more intense options, and he basically told me there was no hope of treating or improving these scars, and that pigment cannot be recreated. I believe him.

BUT I am also holding onto the vain hope that I can at least, on a very superficial level, improve these appearance of these scars in some small way. I feel like they can fade into the skin more evenly and that their texture can be improved and softened. (One of my concerns now is that I don't like people touching my back at all -- which is creating sexual problems).

So I'm asking people here, has anyone had any success with improving these types of scars? If so, what methods have been successful?

Or if you just want to come here and commiserate with me and bitch about how awful these things are, that's fine too!

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I too am interested in a treatment for hypopigmentation. After 4 rounds of silicone injections my scars are almost smooth, but now I'm left with about 8 'white' areas where I treated box car scars with TCA Cross. I think time also has played a role in the 'whitening' of old scar tissue. I am tempted to try permanent make-up tatooing on a couple of them. There is a cosmetic surgeon in my area that offers a digital permanent make-up procedure whom I will call. The device is advertised by his office as a means of 'hiding' scars.

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Check out my posts, I've had some small improvement in hypo scars with fraxel, will keep updating, I am 9 days into my 3rd fraxel....

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i'm not here with a solution, merely to complain! i have small areas of hypertrophic hypopigmentation. i can wear makeup to make it blend, but it completely sucks that although it doesn't feel bumpy when running my hand across them, it looks god awful in certain lighting. my derm told me too that the hypopigmentation is the one thing you can't do anything about. she thinks my texture may improve eventually.

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Needling will get rid of the hypo bc the hypo is a scar.

Keep doing needling once a month every month and u will see the hypo get better,it will take u some months maybe years but the hypo will go.

Read up about selfneedling/needling and learn how it is done.

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Well im getting good improvement on my hypo scars with selfneedling and the dermaroller which i bought off ebay,it as the 1.5mm needles on it.

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Needling does help with hypopigmented scars.

You could even try out having a permanent makeup artist tattoo in some skin-matching pigment into an out of the way area to see if you might like the result.

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I'm doing the needling with the 1.5mm roller, and it has helped bring some pigment back into the white spots. Mine aren't keloids at all- they are flat. From what I've been told, if you get too much sun exposure on freshly healed acne, it can kill the pigment in those areas. The needling breaks through the scars, so melanin producing cells can come through. I'm not sure if I'm explaining it right, but it does seem to be helping mine. I did ask a Dr about tatooing with "skin colored" pigment, but she recomended against it. She said there are too many variations in color in our skin, if you were tatooed with a single color, even if it basically matched, it would look unnatural. And if you got tan, or if you faded afterwards- even worse. So, hopefully the needling will continue to improve my pigment, so I don't need make-up to even it out.

Robin

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I have a hypopigmented spot on my forehead from a prior v-beam laser treatment. The penny-sized spot is a little lighter than my surrounding skin on my forehead, and it does not flush red along with the rest of my skin. This bothers me incredibly. I read a study by pubmed that the fraxel laser corrects hypopigmentation by stimulating new melanocytes to reappear. Is this accurate? and would I just need spot treatments or full forehead treatments?

Has anyone had the fraxel laser for hypopigmentation?

Does it darken the skin and hypopigmented scars?

Where can I find information on needling, My one hypopigmented spot is not a scar. it just looks like a white circular area, the size of a penny on my forehead, it does not flush red along with the rest of my skin when I exercise

I have a hypopigmented spot on my forehead from a prior v-beam laser treatment. The penny-sized spot is a little lighter than my surrounding skin on my forehead, and it does not flush red along with the rest of my skin. This bothers me incredibly. I read a study by pubmed that the fraxel laser corrects hypopigmentation by stimulating new melanocytes to reappear. Is this accurate? and would I just need spot treatments or full forehead treatments?

Has anyone had the fraxel laser for hypopigmentation?

Does it darken the skin and hypopigmented scars?

Where can I find information on needling, My one hypopigmented spot is not a scar. it just looks like a white circular area, the size of a penny on my forehead, it does not flush red along with the rest of my skin when I exercise

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I'm doing the needling with the 1.5mm roller, and it has helped bring some pigment back into the white spots. Mine aren't keloids at all- they are flat. From what I've been told, if you get too much sun exposure on freshly healed acne, it can kill the pigment in those areas. The needling breaks through the scars, so melanin producing cells can come through. I'm not sure if I'm explaining it right, but it does seem to be helping mine. I did ask a Dr about tatooing with "skin colored" pigment, but she recomended against it. She said there are too many variations in color in our skin, if you were tatooed with a single color, even if it basically matched, it would look unnatural. And if you got tan, or if you faded afterwards- even worse. So, hopefully the needling will continue to improve my pigment, so I don't need make-up to even it out.Robin
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I'm doing the needling with the 1.5mm roller, and it has helped bring some pigment back into the white spots. Mine aren't keloids at all- they are flat. From what I've been told, if you get too much sun exposure on freshly healed acne, it can kill the pigment in those areas. The needling breaks through the scars, so melanin producing cells can come through. I'm not sure if I'm explaining it right, but it does seem to be helping mine. I did ask a Dr about tatooing with "skin colored" pigment, but she recomended against it. She said there are too many variations in color in our skin, if you were tatooed with a single color, even if it basically matched, it would look unnatural. And if you got tan, or if you faded afterwards- even worse. So, hopefully the needling will continue to improve my pigment, so I don't need make-up to even it out.Robin

Very good point, thank you.

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Wow, I'll keep that in mind! I simply shared information from my Dermatologist, who, by the way, has seen patients that have had permanent color applied to their white spots. Have a nice weekend.........

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Wow, I'll keep that in mind! I simply shared information from my Dermatologist, who, by the way, has seen patients that have had permanent color applied to their white spots. Have a nice weekend.........
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there's a medication for ppl who have white patches of skin instead of their natural skin color, ppl who have vitiligo use it, I'll get back to you because I can't remember the name atm :confused:

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there's a medication for ppl who have white patches of skin instead of their natural skin color, ppl who have vitiligo use it, I'll get back to you because I can't remember the name atm :confused:
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Maybe V-Tar? think you can get that through your local GP.

Ive had hypo-pigmentation from Co2 laser resurfacing over 10 years ago. After a while you fool yourself into beleiving its not really there! :D

It has improved over time and the loss of pigmentation is not completely gone just less with a slightly different texure to the surrounding skin. 1 patch on each cheek and a few small ones on my forehead. I have been reading these foums for the past 5 years hoping for a solution, i think and although there is alot of positive things being said about needling to help correct hypo-pigmentation i cant seem to find anyone in the UK or ireland that can do it who has experience. Also id be too scared to go with fraxel as ive had bad experiences with lasers. You can see some pics of my scars from an old post, just search for "hypo" and posted by John_Smith. Would love to hear some success stories.

I sent an email to an expert in this area: Naweko San-Joyz - Here are her comments

Thank you for your questions. With respect to treating hypopigmentation, the only viable solution that I've come across in my research is a tar based product available from doctors by prescription. The product is called "V-Tar". The tar based cream actually imparts more color on the lighted areas over a period of months.

As you mentioned, excimer laser treatments are an option for post laser hypopigmentation but based on published studies, you may need between

6-14 treatments to see a 25-75% improvement in your hypopigmentation.

With the 1,550-nm Fraxel SR laser, improvement rates are the same as with the excimer. But the patients only needed 2-4 treatments to see improvements in hypopigmentation with the Fraxel laser. The Fraxel could save you time and money.

So the question is are you happy with a possible 25-75% improvement with the time and cost investment needed or do want to try the V-tar cream.

Your doctor can discuss possible allergies and other potential side effects of V-Tar and the excimer and Fraxel lasers.

If you do go with the laser option, do ask you doctor to see samples of his or her work. Also, if you are going for the excimer or Fraxel, look to see if your doctor has had experience with treating hypopigmentation with lasers. The more experience your physician has, the better your chances are for getting the results you want.

I hope this helps.

Have a wonderful day.

Naweko San-Joyz

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Maybe V-Tar? think you can get that through your local GP.

Ive had hypo-pigmentation from Co2 laser resurfacing over 10 years ago. After a while you fool yourself into beleiving its not really there! :D

It has improved over time and the loss of pigmentation is not completely gone just less with a slightly different texure to the surrounding skin. 1 patch on each cheek and a few small ones on my forehead. I have been reading these foums for the past 5 years hoping for a solution, i think and although there is alot of positive things being said about needling to help correct hypo-pigmentation i cant seem to find anyone in the UK or ireland that can do it who has experience. Also id be too scared to go with fraxel as ive had bad experiences with lasers. You can see some pics of my scars from an old post, just search for "hypo" and posted by John_Smith. Would love to hear some success stories.

I sent an email to an expert in this area: Naweko San-Joyz - Here are her comments

Thank you for your questions. With respect to treating hypopigmentation, the only viable solution that I've come across in my research is a tar based product available from doctors by prescription. The product is called "V-Tar". The tar based cream actually imparts more color on the lighted areas over a period of months.

As you mentioned, excimer laser treatments are an option for post laser hypopigmentation but based on published studies, you may need between

6-14 treatments to see a 25-75% improvement in your hypopigmentation.

With the 1,550-nm Fraxel SR laser, improvement rates are the same as with the excimer. But the patients only needed 2-4 treatments to see improvements in hypopigmentation with the Fraxel laser. The Fraxel could save you time and money.

So the question is are you happy with a possible 25-75% improvement with the time and cost investment needed or do want to try the V-tar cream.

Your doctor can discuss possible allergies and other potential side effects of V-Tar and the excimer and Fraxel lasers.

If you do go with the laser option, do ask you doctor to see samples of his or her work. Also, if you are going for the excimer or Fraxel, look to see if your doctor has had experience with treating hypopigmentation with lasers. The more experience your physician has, the better your chances are for getting the results you want.

I hope this helps.

Have a wonderful day.

Naweko San-Joyz

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bc of needling my acne scars became hypopigmented. they filled in a bit but now they are super white :/

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Guest delta force operators

no for white scars, what u do is get a tatoo in the area that matches the color of ur skin, i think this is called permanent makeup or something I THOUGHT U GUYS KNEW THIS ALREADY

like some people conplain about hypo pigment and hyperpigment, the only answer is to tatoo the area affected

in case of whole face, u tttue ur whole face

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no for white scars, what u do is get a tatoo in the area that matches the color of ur skin, i think this is called permanent makeup or something I THOUGHT U GUYS KNEW THIS ALREADY

like some people conplain about hypo pigment and hyperpigment, the only answer is to tatoo the area affected

in case of whole face, u tttue ur whole face

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Guest delta force operators

lol i consulted a derm about dermabrasion and he said that if i get hyper hypo pig ment the only thing i could do is tatoe my whole face,,,, for some reason he knew like he knew what he was talking about,, or he was just trying to scare me...i dunno, i dont need the dermabrasion anayways.

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The drug vitiligo patients use is called Psoralen and it requires use in conjunction with UV and or sunlight exposure. It might work for scarring hypopigmentation but I'm not sure. I have a small white spot behind my ear and my skin is very light olive, I use Estee Lauder's eye pencil in khaki and then put foundation over it. It works like a charm!

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