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BeautifulSkinAgain

How can I make sure I'm not scarring?

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Hi,

I have been breaking out. I am now taking antibiotics orally and in creamform

I am very very good an ddon't pop any pimples. that's a big no no!

i ususally don't scar but i have a few times.

how can i m ake sure my last breakout didn' leave any scars?

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I don't know, maybe apply some antibiotic cream to the area? And i would reckon its best for the area to be moist rather than dry.

But yeah, if anyone else has some good tips than i would like to know too.

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Hi,

I have been breaking out. I am now taking antibiotics orally and in creamform

I am very very good an ddon't pop any pimples. that's a big no no!

i ususally don't scar but i have a few times.

how can i m ake sure my last breakout didn' leave any scars?

Some tips for general scars (Google 'prevent scarring'):

DON'T Use Hydrogen Peroxide: Who doesn't love those little bubbles that froth up over a cut when it's swabbed with hydrogen peroxide? The bad news is that while the solution cleans, it also destroys new skin cells that immediately begin to grow when you hurt yourself. This slows down the healing process and gives scars a greater chance of forming.

This applies to acne scarring as well.

DON'T Treat With Vitamin E. Vaccariello said she had been told her entire life that vitamin E prompted healing, but more recent studies show that it, like hydrogen peroxide, actually impairs healing. To make matters worse, about one-third of people will develop an allergic reaction to vitamin E.

This applies to acne scarring as well. This is NEW research!

DON'T Expose To Sun: Not only do ultraviolet rays slow the healing process, the can discolor the scar. The sun stimulates the cells that produce pigment, and when your skin is sensitive and healing, it's prone to discoloration. Cover the area with SPF higher than 15.

This applies to acne scarring as well.

DO Cover A Cut: Many people are confused by this tip, is it best to let a cut "breathe," or should you always stick a Band-Aid over it? The answer is - go with the Band-Aid. When you don't cover a cut, it dries out and scabs over. This scab is not a good thing; it only presents a barrier to healing. You want to keep a cut moist and prevent a scab from forming. Vaccariello advises treating cuts with Neosporin and covering with a band-aid for a week. Then continue to dab the wound with Vaseline or something similar and keep covered until new skin begins to grow.

This applies to acne scarring as well. I would cover with small bandaid at night, with antibiotic ointment (ONLY a small dab, as some people get pimples from the Neosporin base).

DO Place Pressure On Cut: You know how sometimes when you lightly run your fingers over your skin, you can feel your scars? You can go to the store and buy special pads that apparently serve to flatten scars; they don't allow the collagen to pop up above the skin when a wound is healing. Some examples of these pads are: Curad Scar Therapy Cosmetic Pads, ReJuveness Pure Silicone Sheeting, Scar Fx and Sypres Scar Sheets.

This most likely applies to hypertrophic acne scarring. I do not see how feasible it would be for applying to facial acne scars, nor necessary. This would be best for post-surgical scarring that has a tendency to create a raised scar. Interesting study though, it encourages the raised scar tissue to have the same temperature as the regular skin and thus encourages better healing. Raised scar tissue is generally cooler than regular skin.

DO Massage The Wound: Once new skin has grown, massage the mark. This helps break down the dense bonds of collagen. If they are not allowed to take hold, the appearance of the scar will be much less noticeable, or may not form at all. Massage - with lotion - in a circular motion for 15 to 30 seconds a few times a day. One lotion to try is Mederma. It's a nonprescription ointment that contains onion extract and has been shown to inhibit the formation of collagen. There are lots of other products for sale that promise to lighten or prevent scars, however, no studies show that they are effective.

This applies to acne scarring as well, but you don't really want to inhibit collagen growth, you just want to have it not adhere improperly. Just use your regular moisturizer and massage it into the scars and gently into the rest of the face. Saline injections work on the same principle: breaking up the adhesions and loosening the hardened tissue and then allowing normalized collagen to remodel the scar.

From: http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2003/05/22/...ain555189.shtml

Red bits are my additions. Just google "Prevent scarring" and you'll find more results. For now, discount the results that suggest vitamin E as new studies indicate it could actually do more harm than good. Be sure to research each suggestion (particularly if the source is older). We all know:

DON'T PICK! :P

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Hi,

I have been breaking out. I am now taking antibiotics orally and in creamform

I am very very good an ddon't pop any pimples. that's a big no no!

i ususally don't scar but i have a few times.

how can i m ake sure my last breakout didn' leave any scars?

Some tips for general scars (Google 'prevent scarring'):

DON'T Use Hydrogen Peroxide: Who doesn't love those little bubbles that froth up over a cut when it's swabbed with hydrogen peroxide? The bad news is that while the solution cleans, it also destroys new skin cells that immediately begin to grow when you hurt yourself. This slows down the healing process and gives scars a greater chance of forming.

This applies to acne scarring as well.

DON'T Treat With Vitamin E. Vaccariello said she had been told her entire life that vitamin E prompted healing, but more recent studies show that it, like hydrogen peroxide, actually impairs healing. To make matters worse, about one-third of people will develop an allergic reaction to vitamin E.

This applies to acne scarring as well. This is NEW research!

DON'T Expose To Sun: Not only do ultraviolet rays slow the healing process, the can discolor the scar. The sun stimulates the cells that produce pigment, and when your skin is sensitive and healing, it's prone to discoloration. Cover the area with SPF higher than 15.

This applies to acne scarring as well.

DO Cover A Cut: Many people are confused by this tip, is it best to let a cut "breathe," or should you always stick a Band-Aid over it? The answer is - go with the Band-Aid. When you don't cover a cut, it dries out and scabs over. This scab is not a good thing; it only presents a barrier to healing. You want to keep a cut moist and prevent a scab from forming. Vaccariello advises treating cuts with Neosporin and covering with a band-aid for a week. Then continue to dab the wound with Vaseline or something similar and keep covered until new skin begins to grow.

This applies to acne scarring as well. I would cover with small bandaid at night, with antibiotic ointment (ONLY a small dab, as some people get pimples from the Neosporin base).

DO Place Pressure On Cut: You know how sometimes when you lightly run your fingers over your skin, you can feel your scars? You can go to the store and buy special pads that apparently serve to flatten scars; they don't allow the collagen to pop up above the skin when a wound is healing. Some examples of these pads are: Curad Scar Therapy Cosmetic Pads, ReJuveness Pure Silicone Sheeting, Scar Fx and Sypres Scar Sheets.

This most likely applies to hypertrophic acne scarring. I do not see how feasible it would be for applying to facial acne scars, nor necessary. This would be best for post-surgical scarring that has a tendency to create a raised scar. Interesting study though, it encourages the raised scar tissue to have the same temperature as the regular skin and thus encourages better healing. Raised scar tissue is generally cooler than regular skin.

DO Massage The Wound: Once new skin has grown, massage the mark. This helps break down the dense bonds of collagen. If they are not allowed to take hold, the appearance of the scar will be much less noticeable, or may not form at all. Massage - with lotion - in a circular motion for 15 to 30 seconds a few times a day. One lotion to try is Mederma. It's a nonprescription ointment that contains onion extract and has been shown to inhibit the formation of collagen. There are lots of other products for sale that promise to lighten or prevent scars, however, no studies show that they are effective.

This applies to acne scarring as well, but you don't really want to inhibit collagen growth, you just want to have it not adhere improperly. Just use your regular moisturizer and massage it into the scars and gently into the rest of the face. Saline injections work on the same principle: breaking up the adhesions and loosening the hardened tissue and then allowing normalized collagen to remodel the scar.

From: http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2003/05/22/...ain555189.shtml

Red bits are my additions. Just google "Prevent scarring" and you'll find more results. For now, discount the results that suggest vitamin E as new studies indicate it could actually do more harm than good. Be sure to research each suggestion (particularly if the source is older). We all know:

DON'T PICK! :P

OMG....NO WONDER my excision results sucked. I threw away all of that money by using hydrogen peroxide the first week. My derm told me to use it daily to clean the areas!! Why didn't he know about the fact it impairs healing. Now I am really depressed :(

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OMG....NO WONDER my excision results sucked. I threw away all of that money by using hydrogen peroxide the first week. My derm told me to use it daily to clean the areas!! Why didn't he know about the fact it impairs healing. Now I am really depressed :(

:( I'm sorry to hear that! Lots of surgeons still recommend H2O2 for wounds that have a tendency to get infected. But plain old soap and water is so much better!

Now that you know, you could try massaging. Remember though that collagen remodelling occurs for months after the excision wound so you may still see more improvement. Don't give up hope. :)

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