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tamlanticyen

what apple is best for acne?

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According to what exactly? Whatever we say you'll just believe?

I have no idea. However, I can point you to this article, which has references to scientific studies (ie, reality). If apples were to help with acne, this *might* be the best way to test which ones are best.

Out of 10 varieties commonly consumed in the U.S., Fuji apples had the highest total phenolic and total flavonoid compounds, but Red Delicious apples were also quite high. These apple varieties also tended to have higher antioxidant activity.

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I think the tarter apples would be better, guessing they have less sugar. And usually, the more flavor, the more nutrients. I prefer types like Gala and Fuji apples which are not quite as tart as Granny Smith.

Last time I tried a red delicious apple, I thought it was the nastiest thing. Too sweet and mealy.

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i loooooooveeeeeeeeeeeee green apples... omg one of my favourite fruits. bestt... and i love the sour crunchy crispy ones. mmm. i think all apples are beneficial, they contain apple pectin which absorbs toxins in the digestive tract, and then the toxins are expelled. as they say, an apple a day keeps the doctor away.

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if you look at nutritiondata.com an apple doesn't have much in the form of vitamins and minerals

luckily it has lots of soluble fibre (pectin) which really helps you keep those bowel movements frequently

if i have a day where i don't eat one apple i really notice a decrease in regularity by the end of the day

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if you look at nutritiondata.com an apple doesn't have much in the form of vitamins and minerals

luckily it has lots of soluble fibre (pectin) which really helps you keep those bowel movements frequently

And enzymes and phytonutrients.

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I eat apples like cookies

I love pink lady apples, and gala apples. Red delicious are good fresh, but when it gets a bit old, it starts to get really dry and nasty.

Green are good, they last quite a while, tastes sour.

But for the sake of acne, no clue, I guess whatever you wish to chose? I honestly haven't looked into it, but I hope you can get something out of it :)

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if you look at nutritiondata.com an apple doesn't have much in the form of vitamins and minerals

luckily it has lots of soluble fibre (pectin) which really helps you keep those bowel movements frequently

if i have a day where i don't eat one apple i really notice a decrease in regularity by the end of the day

Yah I've heard this too. My friend told me they had barely any nutrition when compared to other fruit. But you know what? I like them, they help my poo come out haha, and they taste GOOD!

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if you look at nutritiondata.com an apple doesn't have much in the form of vitamins and minerals

luckily it has lots of soluble fibre (pectin) which really helps you keep those bowel movements frequently

if i have a day where i don't eat one apple i really notice a decrease in regularity by the end of the day

Yah I've heard this too. My friend told me they had barely any nutrition when compared to other fruit. But you know what? I like them, they help my poo come out haha, and they taste GOOD!

I can't believe you said that lmao! :lol:

Not a sexy picture :lol:

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I guess everyone seems to ignore what I post.

THERE IS MORE TO NUTRITION THAN VITAMINS.

http://whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=15

READ.

Review Study Provides Even More Reasons to Enjoy Apples

A major review study published in the Nutrition Journal provides dozens of reasons to enjoy an apple every day.

A review study is one that looks at the results of many other studies. This one included an analysis of 85 studies. Apples were found to be most consistently associated with a reduced risk of cancer, heart disease, asthma, and type 2 diabetes when compared to other fruits and vegetables. In addition, eating apples was also associated with increased lung function and increased weight loss.

Here are some of the reasons why:

Apples are a rich and very important source of phytonutrients, including flavonoids and phenols, in the American diet and in Europe. In the United States, 22% of the phenolic compounds consumed from fruits come from apples, making them the largest source of phenols in the American diet.

When compared to other fruits, apples ranked second in total concentration of phenolic compounds, and perhaps more importantly, had the highest portion of free phenols. Since free phenols are not bound to other compounds in the fruit, they may be more available for absorption into the bloodstream.

Apples are also an excellent source of antioxidants, and when compared to many other commonly consumed fruits in the United States, were found to have the second highest level of antioxidant activity. Many of the phytonutrients found in apples, including quercetin, catechin, phloridzin and chlorogenic acid, are strong antioxidants.

The total antioxidant activity of 100 grams of whole apple (with the peel) was found to be equivalent to the antioxidant effect of about 1500 mg of vitamin C. (However, the amount of vitamin C in 100 g of apples is only about 5.7 mg. Nearly all of the antioxidant activity from apples comes from a variety of other compounds.)

Whole apples, especially their peels, have been found to have a number of powerful antioxidant effects, one of which is to protect VLDL and LDL ("bad") cholesterol from oxidation. Yet when quercitin, one of the most important antioxidant flavonoids in apples, was tested by itself in laboratory animals, it had no protective effect. And when apple flesh and apple juice were tested, they provided less than a tenth the benefit of whole apple.

Apples' protective effects against free radical damage to cholesterol reach their peak at three hours following apple consumption and drop off after 24 hours, providing yet another good reason to eat a whole fresh apple a day.

In animal studies, apples have also been shown to lower LDL ("bad") cholesterol while raising beneficial HDL cholesterol. Not only did the laboratory animals in these studies produce less cholesterol, but they also excreted more in their feces when fed apples, pears and peaches-but apples had the greatest cholesterol-lowering effect.

In the most recent studies, investigators found that the combination of apple pectin and apple phenols lowered cholesterol and triglycerides to a much greater extent than either apple pectin or phenols alone. This again suggests a beneficial synergy between the many healthful compounds found in apples and supports eating the whole fruit instead of simply drinking apple juice, eating peel-free applesauce or taking fiber supplements.

Apples have also been shown to greatly inhibit the growth of liver and colon cancer cells in several studies. In one study, at a dose of 50 mg/mL, liver cancer cell proliferation was inhibited by 39% by extracts of whole Fuji apple and 57% by whole Red Delicious extracts. In another study in which colon cancer cells were treated with apple extracts, cell proliferation was inhibited 43% at a dose of 50 mg/mL.

Promote Optimal Health

Eating an apple a day may also offer significant protection against breast cancer, suggests an animal study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry . When laboratory animals with breast cancer were fed the human equivalent of 1, 3 or 6 apples a day for 6 months, their tumors shrank by 25%, 25%, and 61%, respectively.

Researchers credit apples' strong protective action to the synergistic interactions among the wide variety of potent antioxidant and antiproliferative phytonutrients, including phenolics and flavonoids, they contain.

In several large epidemiological (population) studies conducted in the United Kingdom, Finland and the Netherlands, apple consumption (a minimum of 2 apples per week) was found to be inversely linked with asthma and type 2 diabetes, and positively associated with general lung health. Researchers attribute apples' protective effects in these conditions to apples' high concentration of anti-inflammatory flavonoids, such as quercitin and catechin. In addition to their beneficial effects against chronic diseases including cancer, cardiovascular disease, asthma and diabetes, apples may also help combat cholera. Recently, crude extracts from immature apples were found to inhibit cholera toxin in a dose dependent manner by up to 98%.

And it is supported with evidence. It's called reality. Just because some random person on the internet told you that "all meat and dairy will kill you" doesn't make it true.

* Bazzano LA, He J, Ogden LG, Loria CM, Whelton PK. Dietary fiber intake and reduced risk of coronary heart disease in US men and women: the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey I Epidemiologic Follow-up Study. Arch Intern Med. 2003 Sep 8;163(16):1897-904.

* Boyer J, Liu RH. Apple phytochemicals and their health benefits. Nutr J. 2004 May 12;3(1):5. PMID:15140261.

* Cho E, Seddon JM, Rosner B, Willett WC, Hankinson SE. Prospective study of intake of fruits, vegetables, vitamins, and carotenoids and risk of age-related maculopathy. Arch Ophthalmol. 2004 Jun;122(6):883-92. PMID:15197064.

* Consumers Union of United States, Inc. Do you know what you're eating? An analysis of US government data on pesticide residues in foods. Consumers Union of United States, Inc. Edward Groth III, PhD, Project Director, Charles M. Benbrook, PhD, Consultant, Public Service Projects Department, Technical Division. Feb 1999 1999.

* Dai Q, Borenstein AR, Wu Y, Jackson JC, Larson EB. Fruit and vegetable juices and Alzheimer's disease: the Kame Project. Am J Med. 2006 Sep;119(9):751-9. PMID:16945610.

* Davis PA, Polagruto JA, Valacchi G, Phung A, Soucek K, Keen CL, Gershwin ME. Effect of apple extracts on NF-kappaB activation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Exp Biol Med (Maywood). 2006 May;231(5):594-8. PMID:16636308.

* Ensminger AH, Esminger M. K. J. e. al. Food for Health: A Nutrition Encyclopedia. Clovis, California: Pegus Press; 1986. PMID:15210.

* Fernandez ML. Soluble fiber and nondigestible carbohydrate effects on plasma lipids and cardiovascular risk. Curr Opin Lipidol 2001 Feb;12(1):35-40 2001.

* Heinerman J. Heinerman's New encyclopedia of Fruits and Vegetables. Prentice Hall 1995 1995.

* Honow R, Laube N, Schneider A, Kessler T, Hesse. Influence of grapefruit-, orange- and apple-juice consumption on urinary variables and risk of crystallization. Br J Nutr. Aug;90(2):295-300. 2003. PMID:12908889.

* Huxley RR, Neil HAW. The relation between dietary flavonol intake and coronary heart disease mortality: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies,. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2003) 57, 904-908.

* Kern M, Tjaden Z, Ngiewih Y, Puppel N, Will F, Dietrich H, Pahlke G, Marko D. Inhibitors of the epidermal growth factor receptor in apple juice extract. Mol Nutr Food Res. 2005 Mar 9;49(4):317-328 [Epub ahead of print]. PMID:15759309.

* Knekt P, Jarvinen R, Reunanen A, Maatela J. Flavonoid intake and coronary mortality in Finland: a cohort study. BMJ 1996 Feb 24;312 (7029): 478-81 1996.

* Liu RH, Liu J, Chen B. Apples prevent mammary tumors in rats. J Agric Food Chem. 2005 Mar 23;53(6):2341-3. PMID:15769178.

* Mahan K, Escott-Stump S. Krause's Food, Nutrition, and Diet Therapy. WB Saunders Company; Philadelphia, 1996.

* Olszewska M, Glowacki R, Wolbis M, Bald E. Quantitative determination of flavonoids in the flowers and leaves of Prunus spinosa L. Acta Pol Pharm 2001 May-2001 Jun 30;58(3):199-203. PMID:16270.

* Pearson DA, Tan CH, German JB, et al. Apple juice inhibits low density lipoprotein oxidation. Life Sci 1999;64(21):1913-20 1999.

* Puel C, Quintin A, Mathey J, Obled C, Davicco MJ, Lebecque P, Kati-Coulibaly S, Horcajada MN, Coxam V. Prevention of bone loss by phloridzin, an apple polyphenol, in ovariectomized rats under inflammation conditions. Calcif Tissue Int. 2005 Nov;77(5):311-8. Epub 2005 Nov 16. PMID:16307390.

* Sable-Amplis R, Sicart R, Agid R. Further studies on the cholesterol-lowering effect of apple in humans. Biochemical mechanisms involved. Nutr Res 1983;3:325-8 1983.

* Solovchenko A, Schmitz-Eiberger M. Significance of skin flavonoids for UV-B-protection in apple fruits. J Exp Bot. Aug;54(389):1977-84. Epub 2003 Jun 18. 2003.

* Van Der Sluis AA, Dekker M, Skrede G. Activity and concentration of polyphenolic antioxidants in apple juice. 1. Effect of existing production methods. J Agric Food Chem 2002 Dec 4;50(25):7211-9 2002.

* Wood, Rebecca. The Whole Foods Encyclopedia. New York, NY: Prentice-Hall Press; 1988. PMID:15220.

See this PMID thing? It's a pubmed ID. A valid source.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed

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