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i know that there are probably way way too many topics on this, but I feel my acne has gotten better since drinking MORE milk, what do you think?

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thats quite possibe... if u have more protein in ur diet, the amount of DHT (hormone byproduct that causes acne) produced is decreased.... so yeah.. i personally don't believe all the hype about dairy and acne.

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The amount it affects oil production is so miniscule, that the production from stress, and irritation dwarfs it. Unless you have a food allergy, which I doubt is the case.

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So everyone says we have to go dairy free right? It was understanding that one of the reasons was because of the antibiotics/ hormones they pump into cows...

I'm getting a bit sick of silk, what if I go organic milk? I need some dairy, I'm not diggin this vegan diet

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So everyone says we have to go dairy free right? It was understanding that one of the reasons was because of the antibiotics/ hormones they pump into cows...

I'm getting a bit sick of silk, what if I go organic milk? I need some dairy, I'm not diggin this vegan diet

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it results in an increase in sebum. As for how much, it's probably not more than what you are already producing.

And again, sebum isn't bad, it's bad only if you produce thick viscous sebum. If you regulate your sebum quality back to normal to where it doesn't clog your pores, you will pretty much not have to worry so much about milk, even if your genetics and hormones says how much sebum you should produce =)

But I guess it's different for every person, I don't know.

Try it out, stop it for a month and see if you find any difference. Someone here once said his acne stopped completely from that. So try it.

But if nothing happens, then might as well keep taking it.

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some people say it contains hormones. some say its the sugar. some say its because its hard for your body to digest (its mucous forming or something like that...idk)

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100% fucks me up and I avoid it like the plague. I've experimented with it too much in the past to be foolish enough to not avoid it. I don't need scientific proof when the proof arrives on my face a few hours after i consume it. That's just how it affects me though.

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Once I drank half a gallon of milk in one day (over time, of course!) and I didn't experience any more breakouts than I usually did or when I didn't drink milk.

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Milk is my enemy. Messes up my skin beyond horrible levels. Now, small amounts of cheese especially feta don't have those affects on me when I dont eat a lot at once.

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No, milk is HORRIBLE for acne! imo...but I absolutely love silk, because its: Lactose -free, has way more, proetin and calcium and vitamins than regular milk for an 8-ounce serving..I love it and i drink chocolate and the plain soymilk (the plain is for my cereal) :]

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No, milk is HORRIBLE for acne! imo...but I absolutely love silk, because its: Lactose -free, has way more, proetin and calcium and vitamins than regular milk for an 8-ounce serving..I love it and i drink chocolate and the plain soymilk (the plain is for my cereal) :]

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actaully, soy protein is not worthless!! Where do you get your information from??

here is some information I got off of a website ..........."Soy protein products can be good substitutes for animal products because, unlike some other beans, soy offers a "complete" protein profile. Soybeans contain all the amino acids essential to human nutrition, which must be supplied in the diet because they cannot be synthesized by the human body. Soy protein products can replace animal-based foods--which also have complete proteins but tend to contain more fat, especially saturated fat--without requiring major adjustments elsewhere in the diet."

http://www.fda.gov/Fdac/features/2000/300_soy.html

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I already posted my source. A scientific study showing the outcome of a diet with protein primarily from soy. I linked to an article from a renowned doctor in nutrient science that's also a natural bodybuilder. The article has references to several studies, among them showing how milk protein is vastly superior to soy.

A Protein Is Not A Protein

In this section, I'd like to demonstrate that not all proteins were created equal. Specifically, I'll briefly discuss whey and casein protein, fast and slow protein, animal and vegetable protein, cod/fish protein and soy protein.

The topic of whey vs. casein has been discussed ad nauseum lately so rather than belabor this issue, I'll quickly summarize a few studies.

Demling et al (2000) compared two groups on a 2100 to 2300kcal diet containing 143gP (26%), 286gC (52%), and 49gF (20%). Both groups weight trained for twelve weeks but received 75g of their daily protein intake from either a whey-based drink or a milk-protein isolate drink (80% casein, 20% whey). At the end of the study, the milk-protein isolate group lost more fat (15.4lbs vs. 9.2lbs), gained more lean mass (9lbs vs. 4.4lbs), and gained more upper and lower body strength than the whey group. It appears that milk protein isolate ingestion, when on a training program, may be a better way to enhance fat loss and muscle gain.

Lands et al (1999) showed that when supplementing with 20g of whey or casein for three months, the whey group had up-regulated their antioxidant defense systems and had increased performance in an anaerobic exercise task. The casein group didn't improve on any of the above parameters. Therefore whey may be better for antioxidant protection.

Since the fast vs. slow debate focuses on whey (fast) vs. casein (slow), let's address that research here. In studies by Boirie et al (1997) and Dangin et al (2001), it was shown that whey protein is better for up-regulating protein synthesis while casein protein is better for down-regulating protein breakdown. Not much more has to be said about this since it's been discussed about a thousand other times on this site alone. The take-home message from these studies is that a milk protein blend or a supplement containing whey + casein may be your best bet for body composition improvements.

Next up, what about those kooky vegetarians? Well, in comparing an omnivorous diet (meat containing) with a vegetarian diet, Campbell et al (1995, 1999) demonstrated that strength gains and body composition improvements are impaired when meat is removed from the diet.

In their studies, subjects weight trained for twelve weeks while consuming a 2300kcal diet consisting of 70-90gP (12-15%), 267-317gC (49%), and 82-87gF (7-11%). The only difference between groups was the fact that one group ate a meat-free diet while the other group ate meat. At the end of the twelve weeks, the meat eaters lost 2.8lbs of fat while gaining 3.74lbs of lean tissue. The vegetarians, on the other hand, lost no fat weight and lost 1.76lbs of lean tissue. Bottom line, meat seems to be an essential part of the diet.

Regarding fish in the diet, Lavigne et al (2001) demonstrated that cod protein was better than soy or casein for increasing muscle glucose sensitivity and for preventing insulin resistance in high-fat fed rats. Since codfish has a favorable omega-3 profile, the researchers duplicated their work using only the protein component of cod and the benefits remained the same. This indicates that eating fish may improve your carbohydrate sensitivity and ultimately your body composition and these effects may be independent of the fatty acid profile.

Finally, Lohrke et al (2001) showed that growing pigs fed a diet consisting of soy as the only source of protein had lower body weights, amino acid imbalances, increased cortisol levels, and increased muscle breakdown. The casein-fed pigs grew normally. This study indicates that a diet containing exclusively a low quality protein (soy in this case) may interfere with normal growth and development.

So, how do we use this information to our advantage? Well, since different protein sources confer different benefits, your best bet is to eat some fish protein (cod, salmon, tuna), some lean meat protein, and some milk protein isolates or whey/casein blends each day. Eating from a limited list of protein sources is a big mistake.

Depending on their individual needs, my clients typically eat a different protein source with every meal so that by the end of the day they've gotten complete protein from egg whites, fat free cheese, milk protein isolate shakes, cottage cheese, salmon or tuna and lean beef, not to mention the incomplete sources like mixed beans and mixed nuts.

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I have seen a study talking about the correlation of acne in teenage girls and milk consumption, especially skim milk. The study concluded with the thought that excess iodine and IGF-1 in milk can contribute to acne.

IGF-1 is inulin like growth hormone. It's true that milk spikes insulin. But so does the sugary/starchy crap that everyone's munching on these days.

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i always thought milk was bad for acne. but that may not always be the case. there still are a lot of people who say milk is really good for you. probably if you have an allergy to it it will cause you to break out.

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I have seen a study talking about the correlation of acne in teenage girls and milk consumption, especially skim milk. The study concluded with the thought that excess iodine and IGF-1 in milk can contribute to acne.

IGF-1 is inulin like growth hormone. It's true that milk spikes insulin. But so does the sugary/starchy crap that everyone's munching on these days.

That study seemed bias IMO. First off, how can they conclude that excess iodine and IGF-1 contributes to acne when they say skim milk is more likely to contribute to acne, yet their iodine and IGF-1 contents are equal to whole milk? It doesn't make sense. That's like saying Michael Jordan is more likely to make a game winning shot than Michael Jordan.

Milk spikes insulin becauses of carbohydrates and proteins. Any food with protein content will spike blood insulin levels. Foods with both, like beans, spike insulin levels at a pretty high rate...but especially bakery goods. Beef spikes insulin levels higher than pasta. The insulin index might be more useful than the GI or GL, since many people on low carb diets still don't see an improvement in their acne.

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