Jump to content
Acne.org
Search In
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

I'm curious to this one as well. I have heard people say that sunlight is good for acne, and then I have heard other people say to avoid the sun because it can cause acne... I do know that a little bit of sunlight is reguired for healthy skin, so I can't see how it could cause acne unless by the sunburn/irritation method mentioned above... 30 minutes of sunlight a day is healthy for the skin... Other than that, I don't know...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think it does, but if you put on a ton of BP Gel, and then go outside in direct sunlight, especially without moisturizer, you might trigger a massive breakout, because not only would it be severely drying/damaging, but there's chemical reactions and stuff that would happen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The other thing I don't like about the sun regarding acne is that it accentuates the red marks. Because acne is always in the process of healing, even in the midst of an eruption, the sun's rays and skin-damaging factors can't be good. It's always best to wear sunscreen, wear a hat, and keep sun exposure to your face to a minimum (IMO).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sun does NOT cause acne, sun helps with acne because of it's drying effects and because of the vitamin D. Also the tan gives an even complexion.

However while using BP your skin is more sensitive to the UV rays and you just have to be a little careful.

Some choose to avoid the sun like a plague which I believe is a bad move as IMO the sun is essential for healthy skin.

It's all down to which reports you believe but I know for sure when I go abroad my skin is flawless without products because of the sun.

I love the sun.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

here is a quote I have from Dan:

"I don't think the sun is evil by any means, but excess exposure I have

found really can backfire. At first your skin may look better, but as

your skin heals from the exposure it can break out."

And here is information from Dr. Fulton's book "Acne RX":

The ultraviolet rays of the sun irritate and damage skin. The skin responds with stepped-up production of replacement cells not only on the surface but also down inside the follicles. In one out of ten individuals this increased cell production flushes out the pores helping to loosen comedones and therefore improves the acne condition. In another individual, the faster-proliferating cells sludge up in the pores creating an acne flare up. For the other eight, who are perhaps less sensitive, the subtle changes in the pores are not significant enough to provoke any noticeable change.

Acne flare-ups can also result from the heat and humidity of summertime weather. If you notice flare-ups as a result of sunlight, stay out of the sun. When you must be in the sun, use a non-greasy sunscreen to block the irritating rays.

Laboratory tests of ultraviolet light's effect on the skin have shown very little proof of benefit for acne sufferers but there may be other reasons sunbathing seems to improve acne. It may not actually be the sun but the relaxation of basking in it or the extra sleep you get on the lazy days of summer. Furthermore, a tan lends a cover-up effect. The deeper color can hide lesions and red spots of past pimples. Your skin may not actually be healthier, even though it appears healthier.

All things considered, however, sunlight has more drawbacks than benefits. There is no getting around it, sun damages and prematurely ages the skin. Its rays reach down into the collagen layers and begin breaking them down. The damage won't show until you get older and suddenly the collagen layer loses its elasticity. Its a myth that oily skin prevents wrinkles and sun damage. In fact, the opposite is true, the more oils in the skin, the better the penetration of ultraviolet rays.....................

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Its a myth that oily skin prevents wrinkles and sun damage. In fact, the opposite is true, the more oils in the skin, the better the penetration of ultraviolet rays.....................

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Paul,

It may have something to do with this. Oily-skinned people are more likely to tan easily. I know this is true for myself and most other oily skinned people I know. So, perhaps the oil helps draw or direct the suns rays in? I don't know really.

The above was just quotes from Dr. Fulton's book. He is a long-time acne sufferer himself, and a dermatologist and researcher.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry Brandy I did realise they were not your own words...

You're right about oily skin tanning easier without a doubt, I tan easily.

I believe it's the amount of Melanin in our skin that causes us to tan, oily skinned people tend to have more melanin.

The more melanin in the skin the less damage made by the sun, because the skin is better able to repair itself and that's why we tan and those with fairer skin and less melanin tend to turn red and peel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Moderation. Sun damages the skin and can cause skin cells to shed faster, which is horrible for acne since everyone with acne already has trouble with skin shedding improperly.

Also, the sun causes photo-damage which causes premature aging, all of which is cumulative. The more you are out in the sun, the sooner those wrinkles will start appearing. Some is okay, but extended will cause much more harm than good. (there's always that whole cancer thing also from UVA, ya know, damaging your DNA and all that).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Its a myth that oily skin prevents wrinkles and sun damage. In fact, the opposite is true, the more oils in the skin, the better the penetration of ultraviolet rays.....................

but he failed to mention how oil in the skin actually DOES help prevent the aging effects of the sun by reducing the drying effects. So it's not a Myth at all, oily skin both pro's and con's in sun exposure. Take a person with very dry skin and stick them in the sun for a day, take a person why very oily skin and stick them in the sun for the day, the results will speak for themselves. Dr Fulton only bothered to address the points that back up his own belief.

My own experience: Both myself and my friends as teens had better skin during the summer and all found that using sunbeds and sun bathing helped our acne.

My own belief is that everybody reacts differently to the sun, to topicals etc, when there are conflicting reports, I think it's best to try it out for yourself and see how your own skin reacts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Personalized Advice Quiz - All of Acne.org in just a few minutes


×