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Danny©

low carb vs. high carb

I often discuss with people in here that either promotes one approach at the expense of the other or either are suffering because it's not working for them and are confused from listening to those people or not making sense of the controverty

I'd like to know what do you think in term of health is better

The relevance to diet? We should never forget that from a very common sense base whatever our body gladly accepts, absorb and process without effort is not going to feed pathological processes like acne

So what's your opinion? (I will share mine later)

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In my opinion, some people are designed to thrive on low carb diets while others are designed to thrive on high carb diets.

So my answer is: it depends on your body.

The best way to tell is to experiment with your own diet and see what gives you the most energy.

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i need complex carbs at almost every meal in order to have consistent steady energy throughout the day and in particular when lifting in the evening

if this frequent carb intake (no white bread, white bagels, egg noodles, etc.) is detrimental for my skin then it is a small price to pay for strength and energy

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I believe acne is a symptom. The most effective way to get rid of it is to figure out what the underlying cause(s) is/are. However, that can be difficult. I think acne might have a multifactorial basis in many people, making the problems more difficult to parse out. Eating 'healthy' is always a good choice, BUT it may not cure the acne if you are still eating something that is contributing to that underlying cause.

Based on everything I've read the past few years while trying to figure out my own acne, I think MANY people with acne have intestinal dysbiosis, (e.g. candida) which leads to food sensitivities, constipation, or other problems, which in turn, lead to acne. Undoubtedly, others have other problems (PCOS, endometriosis), or some combination of issues.

Of all the "natural" methods I've read of people doing, a low-carb "paleo" style diet, or at least a gluten-free, sugar-free diet seems to be the most effective, just based off of success stories I've read on this and other boards, and based on my own success. I believe it works for some of us is BECAUSE it remedies, or least over-rides, that underlying cause. The possible causes that I've listed above; candida, endometriosis, etc are diseases that respond to low-carb - or at least gluten-free.

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Moderate carb (haha). High carb made me tired and I felt really crappy. Low carb I felt really good but once I returned to basketball and wehgtlifting, I found myself bruning out. I added back in steel cut oats and potatoes either before or after workouts.

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I'm an athlete, and I've found cyclical low-carb diets to be very good.

The basic idea is that fat burning is preferred for low-power activities, and carbs are needed for higher intensity power output. The issue with high carb diets is that when there is such an abundance of carbs, and a scarce supply of fats, the body will adapt by increasing the carb burning rate, thus sparing the fats which are needed for other functions than energy supply. I don't know the pathways through which this all happens, but it makes sense to me from a resource management perspective. One implication here is that glycogen stores can be depleted more easily by lower intensity activity, eventually leading to a lack of energy due to low blood sugar if carbs aren't consumed regularly.

Now, let's say you go onto a high-fat, low-carb diet (by low carb, I mean very low but just above ketogenic ~30-50 grams carbs/day). By switching up those macronutrients, the body should adapt in the opposite way from the high-carb diet: glycogen should be saved for high intensity activity because of its scarcity, with fat burning fulfilling a larger proportion of the low-intensity energy demands. Now, with such an adaptation your energy levels should be much steadier since your fat stores should contain a lot more energy than your glycogen stores.

Now how about athletes, you might ask. Surely, we require more carbs right? After all, there are correlations between performance and muscle glycogen levels, for example. This is where the cyclical part of the diet comes into play. Your body is adapted to hang onto those carbs for when it really needs them -> now what you need to do is refill those stores periodically. In "The anabolic diet" for example, you are supposed to "carb-up" over the weekend while staying low-carb during the week. The result is that your body has access to either fats or carbs as an energy source. The key thing is that adaptation, which makes you more use those carbs more effectively (i.e. in situations where they are needed, and less so when they aren't required).

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Now how about athletes, you might ask. Surely, we require more carbs right? After all, there are correlations between performance and muscle glycogen levels, for example. This is where the cyclical part of the diet comes into play. Your body is adapted to hang onto those carbs for when it really needs them -> now what you need to do is refill those stores periodically. In "The anabolic diet" for example, you are supposed to "carb-up" over the weekend while staying low-carb during the week. The result is that your body has access to either fats or carbs as an energy source. The key thing is that adaptation, which makes you more use those carbs more effectively (i.e. in situations where they are needed, and less so when they aren't required).

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I don't think this is ideal because the carb loading may create the same problem of an high GI and high carb diet especially for people with who are less insuline sensitive

I think that the timed approach is better

It works by the same principle for athletes (i.e. maintaining glycogen and lower levels and prompting the body to burn mostly fat in endurance conditions) but avoid the problemating carb loading

It's still a cyclical diet but the cycle is shorter. Low carb all the time except after the exercise

This allow a fat burning conditioning at lower intensity for endurance athletes while still prodivind the necessary glycogen fill up. Carb loading doesn't provide carbs only at a time of very high insulin sensitivity and as showed by studies it still for many induces the same ill response of wrecked blood sugar control

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