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I just read an article regarding a new study on diet and acne.....thought others might find it helpful....after reading it, I certainly know I need to change my eating habits..

Here is the article....

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Calling into question the current medical belief that diet does not affect acne, a new report suggests that regularly eating breads, cakes, chips and other staples of Western culture may promote the skin condition.

Dr. Loren Cordain, a professor of health and exercise science at Colorado State University in Fort Collins, and colleagues arrived at their conclusion after studying two non-Westernized populations: the Kitavan Islanders of Papua New Guinea and the Ache hunter-gatherers of Paraguay.

In the December issue of the Archives of Dermatology (news - web sites), the study authors report that they found no evidence of acne among 1,200 Kitavan Islanders aged 10 or older, including 300 of them between 15 and 25. They ate primarily fruit, fish, tubers and coconut but almost no cereals or refined sugars.

The researchers also saw no acne among 115 Ache hunter-gatherers, including 15 aged 15 to 25. Their diet consisted mostly of the root vegetable sweet manioc, peanuts, maize and rice, as well as some wild game. About 8% of their diet was made up of Western foods such as pasta, sugar and bread. Previous studies also have found that acne is rare or nonexistent in people living in non-industrialized cultures but tends to appear when they transition to a Western way of life, the report indicates.

In Western cultures, studies have indicated that acne affects 79% to 95% of adolescents and persists into middle age in 12% of women and 3% of men.

While genetic factors are known to play a role in acne, the authors point out that other groups of Pacific Islanders and South American Indians who live in more Westernized settings have higher rates of acne.

So the investigators turned their focus to environmental differences that might contribute to acne. "The most likely environmental factor that can elicit the hormonal cascade underlying acne is dietary in nature," Cordain told Reuters Health. "High-glycemic-load carbohydrates have been demonstrated to cause the exact hormonal changes known to occur with acne."

He said there is evidence to suggest that high-glycemic carbohydrates--those that substantially boost blood sugar levels--"set off a series of hormonal changes known to underlie the development of acne."

Elevated blood sugar leads to increases in insulin production, Cordain explained. This affects other hormones that ultimately can cause excess oil in the skin to be produced, pores to be clogged and bacteria that cause acne to thrive, he said.

High-glycemic foods include cereals, bagels and other breads, doughnuts and cakes, crackers, chips and candy.

Low-glycemic diets, including plenty of fruits and vegetables, might offer a new treatment option for people with acne, Cordain suggested.

However, this remains to be proven, note the authors of an accompanying editorial.

"Whether adherence to a diet with a low glycemic load can alter acne in other populations is unknown," write Dr. Diane Thiboutot of Hershey, Pennsylvania, and Dr. John Strauss of Iowa City, Iowa.

And while observations suggest that acne can develop in groups such as Eskimos who didn't have the skin condition until they started eating more high-glycemic foods, the editorialists add, "no systematic studies are available to fully support or refute these observations."

SOURCE: Archives of Dermatology 2002;138:1584-1592

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Thank you Yorkshire, I totally agree with this article.

I think it is very interesting to note that for years nobody said there was a link between diet and acne, but people who suffer from acne can tell you that things like chocolate and sugar cause their flareups. But they can't "prove" it because the candy companies would sue them.

I urge everyone on this board to reduce or eliminate their intake of sugars and refined carbohydrates! I am trying to do it and it is really hard!

Sugar can be addictive for some people. I recommend reading "Potatoes not Prozac" by Kathleen DesMaisons (available at the library or on Amazon.com.) for more on sugar addiction and kicking the sugar habit.

Take care,

Julie

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Yeah. all this seems very true accept I would think the people that ate fish might have SOME breakouts due to the amount of iodine in fish.

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Diet and Acne: A Rebuttal from The Archives of Dermatology

Just to show you guys that I am openminded, here is an article in response to the oft-mentioned "Diet and Acne" discussion on the boards. I have maintained that eating sugar can cause acne in people who are sugar-sensitive. I still maintain: see for yourself. Try eliminating sugars and refined carbs from your diet and see what happens on your face.

The article below is full of scientific jargon, but since all of you are intelligent enough to use the Internet :wink: I'm sure you'll understand the gist of it.

Basically, the authors question whether acne correlates with a high-glycemic diet, that is, eating lots of starches, breads, pastries, cakes, candy, sweetened drinks and other refined sugars and refined carbohydrates. The study suggested that adolescents who eat a Western diet are more likely to product factors that increase oil production (sebum) in the skin, resulting in acne. The author of the rebuttal makes some interesting arguments as to why this is hard to prove.

Here is the link; below is the entire article.

http://archderm.ama-assn.org/issues/v138n1...l/ded20001.html

Diet and Acne Revisited

Diane M. Thiboutot, MD; John S. Strauss, MD

THE ARTICLE by Cordain et al1 in this issue of the ARCHIVES represents an interesting departure for a contemporary, peer-reviewed medical journal. While the present-day emphasis is on controlled, double-blinded clinical studies that pass the muster for evidence-based medicine, the report by Cordain et al is observational, and the only control is the dietary limitations characteristic of 2 isolated nonwesternized populations.

These authors suggest that the absence of acne in more than 1300 subjects in 2 nonwesternized societiesthe Kitavan Islanders of Papua New Guinea and Aché hunter-gatherers of Paraguayis attributable to their diets, which have a substantially lower glycemic index than a Western diet. In addition, these people are more physically active than Westerners. They do not demonstrate insulin resistance, nor do they have obesity, hypertension, diabetes, or heart disease. Their genetic background is similar to other Pacific Islanders and South American Indians, respectively, yet their incidence of acne is lower than that of members of these same groups who have incorporated elements of a Western diet.

Isolated observations and case reports suggest that acne can develop in groups not generally susceptible to this disorder when a highly glycemic diet is adopted, which can induce acute or chronic hyperinsulinemia, as in the case of Eskimos who adopted a Western diet.2 One of us (J.S.S.) has also heard many young Irish women report that they had no acne until they immigrated to the New England area from rural Ireland. However, no systematic studies are available to fully support or refute these observations. Of course, the study by Cordain et al1 would have benefited from the opportunity to provide the subjects with a diet containing highly glycemic foods to determine if acne occurred, but this was not possible.

The relationship of acne to foods is certainly not new. The "big three" US textbooks of dermatology3-5 popular in the early 1950s when one of us (J.S.S.) was in training all contained elaborate prose regarding specific foods to avoid. The admonition to avoid chocolate, fats, sweets, and carbonated beverages was commonly given to patients as part of acne therapy. But all of this dietary advice was removed from standard texts, and it has been many years since restriction of specific foods has been recommended in managing acne. Nonetheless, few of us feel compelled to argue strongly with the occasional patient who insists that his or her acne is exacerbated by a certain food item. It should be noted, however, that it was reported in an article published only last year6 that 30% of medical students surveyed in Australia believed that acne was influenced by diet.

Cordain et al1 suggest that diet-induced hyperinsulinemia elicits endocrine responses that may affect the development of acne through mediators such as androgens, insulinlike growth factor (IGF) 1, IGF binding protein 3, and retinoid signaling pathways. The role of diet in endocrine activity is supported by the observation that improvements in nutrition have been linked to an earlier onset of sexual maturation and the development of acne in young girls and boys. Numerous studies have shown that improvements in general nutrition in girls have led to an earlier onset of menses and that menses is delayed in girls with low body fat such as athletes and ballet dancers.7 In 1970, the mean age of onset of menarche in the United States was 12 years compared with age 16 years for girls in 1835.8 Of interest is the observation that the mean age of onset of menarche in the Kitavan population is 16 years, which is significantly older than girls in westernized societies. In a 5-year longitudinal cohort study of 439 black girls and 432 white girls in Cincinnati, Ohio, Lucky et al9 demonstrated that those with severe comedonal acne had a significantly earlier age of onset of menarche and higher serum levels of dehydroepiandrosterone than girls with mild comedonal acne. This study demonstrated that the early development of comedonal acne might be one of the best predictors of later, more severe disease. In a similar 5-year longitudinal study of 219 black and 249 white early adolescent boys in Cincinnati, black boys had higher pubertal maturation scores than white boys of the same age.10 The prevalence and severity of acne correlated well with advancing pubertal maturation. Is the late onset of menarche in Kitavan girls "protective" against the development of acne or severe acne? Although Cordain et al do not present data regarding the age of sexual maturation of the Kitavan or Aché boys, is it also possible that their relative lack of acne might relate to a later age of pubertal maturation and sebaceous gland exposure to higher circulating levels of androgen?

If acne results from hyperinsulinemia, as proposed by Cordain et al,1 one would expect that obese individuals, who are relatively chronically insulin resistant, would have a higher prevalence of acne. Bourne and Jacobs11 evaluated 2720 military recruits for obesity and the presence of acne and noted an association between the 2 in the older recruits (ages 20-40 years) but not in those in the age range of 15 to 19 years. This observation suggests that the presence of acne in a younger population may be associated with factors other than obesity or insulin resistance. In fact, serum levels of IGF-1 are highest during periods of the adolescent growth spurt and taper off in the 20s, which coincides with the pattern in the peak incidence of acne.12 Insulinlike growth factor 1 functions similarly to insulin in that it can promote the growth of keratinocytes and sebaceous glands. It is possible that that the effects of the hyperinsulinemia on acne in obese adolescents may be overshadowed by the effects of high levels of circulating IGF-1. As pointed out by Cordain et al, acne has been associated with elevated serum levels of IGF-1 in adult women with acne.13 All adolescents, including the Kitavan and Aché, would experience increases in IGF-1 during adolescence, so increases in IGF-1 alone cannot explain the presence of acne.

Within the past few years, tremendous advances have been made in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of obesity, insulin resistance, diabetes, and hyperandrogenism. For example, the association of hyperandrogenism and acne in women with conditions such as polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) has been clearly established. In women with PCOS, insulin resistance can lead to hyperandrogenism, which then can lead to the exacerbation of acne. The treatment of PCOS now includes drugs such as thiazolidinediones and metformin, which are aimed at increasing insulin sensitivity. The reduction in serum insulin concentration has been linked to a reduction in the level of serum androgens and improvement in fertility.14 Whether this reduction in serum insulin and androgen levels equates with an improvement in acne remains to be determined.

Interestingly, not all women with PCOS are obese. Hyperandrogenism, insulin resistance, and acne still occur in lean women with this disorder. If hyperinsulinemia rather than hyperandrogenism exacerbated acne, we would expect to see much more acne in obese men and women with diabetes, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance. This does not appear to be the case. On the other hand, type 2 diabetes is generally a disease of adults, who have lower serum levels of IGF-1 and growth hormone than adolescents. Perhaps the increasing levels of growth hormone, IGF-1, and androgens in the adolescent sets the stage for susceptibility to diet-induced hyperinsulinemia as a trigger for the development of acne.

Although Cordain et al1 make a strong argument for the role of diet in acne, we believe that it is difficult to dissociate environmental factors such as diet from genetic factors in their study. The Aché and Kitavan people live in closely knit communities, and therefore genetic factors may play a role in the relative lack of acne in these populations. Several studies point to an association of genetic factors with acne, including studies that demonstrate variations in the prevalence of acne among ethnic groups and the high degree of concordance of acne in twins.15-19

In fact, numerous studies have failed to demonstrate significant differences in sebum composition between subjects with and without acne, suggesting that overall sebum production and not sebum composition is more important in the development of acne. During periods of starvation, when total caloric consumption is greatly reduced, sebum production is decreased by about 40%,20, 21 which could certainly improve acne. However, this reduction occurred with extreme caloric restriction (<100 calories/d [<418 J/d]), a circumstance that is not practical to apply as a therapy, to say the least. In each of these studies, changes in the quantity and quality of sebum were reversed after a normal diet was resumed. Biochemical studies clearly demonstrate that the sebaceous gland can make lipids (cholesterol, squalene, triglycerides, wax esters, and cholesterol esters) from a variety of substrates (including acetate, glucose, and fatty acids) that serve to donate 2 carbon fragments.22, 23 The starvation studies indicate that a dietary source of substrates is needed to produce sebaceous lipids. The type of food from which substrates are derived may not be important in overall sebum production.

In summary, as proposed by Cordain et al,1 it remains possible that adolescents in westernized societies may be repeatedly acutely hyperinsulinemic due to their highly glycemic diet. Hyperinsulinemia in turn may initiate an endocrine cascade that affects the sebaceous gland and follicular keratinization and involves IGF, IGF binding protein 3, androgens, and retinoid signaling pathways. Whether adherence to a diet with a low glycemic load can alter acne in other populations is unknown.

If you got this far, I give you a high-five! :wink:

Julie

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Guest fatman_uk

Some people will never accept that diet can affect some peoples acne, they're too stuck in their creature comforts an enjoy candy, MacDonalds an greasy take-aways too much. :roll:

I personally cut out all the stuff u could count as junk for a month an my complexion went great, i was already clear so i cant say it cleared me, but if i hadnt been clear im totally sure it would of helped. :wink:

Now i treat my self once, maybe twice a week to the occasional candy bar, doughnut or whatever, i let myself have take-aways from my mates chinese takeaway once every week or 2 but i stay away from MacDonalds... they're evil. :twisted:

I also ate about 6 candy bars a day over each day from the 23rd to the 26th as a kinda test an sure enough my skin got greasy, but somehow also flaky.... redmarks flared up so i think it may have caused some kinda rash or sumthin as opposed to acne with whiteheads...it was disgusting.... i stopped eatin that crap coz i hated what it did to me an it took me till yesterday to get back where i was... so a quick recover for me. :oops:

My advice.... regulate ur eating, but don't torture yourself by avoidin what u like.... how boring would life be without the fun bits? :shock:

-Gaz

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I am in total agreement with Fatman. It is neccesary to watch what you're eating. Try to cut out processed foods as much as you can, but treat yourself every now and then. People always wonder how I stay in good shape because I actually eat a lot for a girl, and I always tell them it's not how much I eat, but what I eat that keeps me in good shape. I have to say though over the ten years I've had acne, My diet (no matter how much I try to change it) never seems to have anything to do with my acne. But everyones acne is different, thats for sure. I will say this though, even if it doesn't rid you of acne, it will do wonders for your body and mind, to eat right.

Mercer

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Yes, diet definately affects your complexion. Before I started BB'ing i was drinking only 6 to 8 cups of water daily and eating very high GI carbs (like 70-100 vs glucose). Not only was this making me very insulin insensitive but i think it was throwing me hormonally out of wack.

Now I drink 20-24 cups of water daily, and I eat only low gi carbs all day except after workouts when I want to spike my insulin to create an anabolic environment. My complexion, with help of the regimen and other things, has improved vastly.

I'd suggest you drop those dinner rolls, white bread. Stop eating white rice, cakes, etc. Start eating yams, kidney beans, long grain parboiled brown rice, etc. Fruits are intermediate gi carbs, so eat them sparringly.

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Guest fatman_uk

ANYTHING u want, in MODERATION... thats the point ive/we've been tryin to make. :shock:

-Gaz

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I really hate to go against this, but the truth of the matter is,,,

Acne does not come from the food we eat,,,that is a myth, not true....

I've had acne most of my life, It started at 12 and I am now 29....My skin has been clear for almost a yr not because of my diet, but because I found the problem and acted upon it..

I do agree with the water part,, it is very important to drink water, not only does it help the skin but cleans out your system as well.

Hormones play the biggest role in acne, we cant avoid it but we can help it,,,

I have tried it all, from over the counter solutions, to my dermatologist, with chemical peels and everything else,,,the thing is what's the point of getting the peels if your still gonna get more acne?

my last alternative was what i saw on t.v. yes i was skeptical as i usually am since i've tried just about everything but 3 to 4 weeks later after i was using it,, i could not believe the results....Proactiv, has made my life much happier, i donot have low self esteem anymore, i don't have to be embarresed when i leave my house, it's done wonders..

The thing with proactiv is that, it doesnt just dry up your acne, what's the point of that when you know your gonna get more, it actually takes away the dead skin cells, then medicates from getting further blemishes, it's amazing, that's all i can say..

If i could, i would tell the whole world about it, because i know how it feels with having acne,, but i promise you it works....

It's not expensive so please whoever is reading this go and buy it,,,

you will not be dissapointed.

I still drink my caffeine, i still muge at dunken doughnuts, i really eat whatever i want and there's no problems ,,,it isn't what you eat,,,

Yes physically, you will feel better on a healthy diet but that is not the culprit of your acne....i am proof of that....

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Guest fatman_uk

OK, so for a week i dare u to have greasy full english breakfasts, doughnuts an coffee for lunch, an spicy indian food with alll the grasy an spicy timmings followed by some pure wicked chocolate cake an drink Pepsi all that week.,,

O, an whenever u wanna snack, either have fried bread or double coc chip cookie. MMMmm, tasy, huh? :idea:

Then come back an tell me food don't make a difference. :shock:

-Gaz

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Guest fatman_uk
I really hate to go against this, but the truth of the matter is,,,

P.S - There is no ONE truth, only seperate opinions.

-Gaz

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I am not the only one who thinks this way, just goto the homepage here and look under myths, you'll find he truth there as well.

I am only reponding because ive been thru this...I do not limit my chocolate or doughnuts or whatever else i feel like having because of acne, if i do it its because physically i feel better...why is this so hard to believe?

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Guest fatman_uk
just goto the homepage here and look under myths, you'll find he truth there as well.

Dude, like i sed, its jus anuther opinion, off Dan, from HIS experience.

If u can get away with eatin what u like then power to you. :shock:

But the majority of ppl who've posted in this topic say different, so the 'truth' as u put it certainly don't apply to EVERYONE, sadly. :roll:

I still dare u to try that uber healthy diet i posted previously. :idea:

-Gaz

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Okay I will not argue about this, but i tend to believe if that's what your focusing on and then following thru with it then please tell me why everyone still seems to have an acne problem?

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Guest fatman_uk

Well, i don't have an acne problem.... so tell me why i do if i eat LOTS of junk?

-Gaz

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If you do not have an acne prob why are you at this site?

I eat whatever i want and have had no breakouts because of proactiv..

I am at this site to try and help others, because i know the pain people have with acne...and there is a way out...

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Guest fatman_uk
If you do not have an acne prob why are you at this site?

Coz i like to help ppl, ask around, u may find i occasionally give good info, hahhaa. :idea:

I eat whatever i want and have had no breakouts because of proactiv..

Good for u but i heard Proactiv sucks.... guess thats not true tho since it works for u... your word is golden it seems. :shock:

I am at this site to try and help others, because i know the pain people have with acne...and there is a way out...

Try helping instead of being so closed minded an ridiculing an writing off other ppls experiences and views then. :idea:

-Gaz

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Guest fatman_uk

I did actually carry on the natter in this post, but decided to edit it out... a good friend of mine once said...

'Never argue with an idiot on the internet, They drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.'

... I see his point now.

-Gaz

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Dear Hopeful,

I'm glad ProActiv worked for you. It is similar to Dan's regimen in that the bp is 2.5% and you are supposed to use it morning and night.

But, please be kind for some people.

(I urge everyone to try examining their diet for factors that cause acne, especially sugar, high-glycemic carbs w/o balancing protein; sugary drinks, caffeine and stimulants like chocolate -- which has a lot of sugar in it -- even high doses of fruit juice if taken on an empty stomach without other foods to slow the rate of absorption.)

Regarding the "myth"yet. Remember they used to think it was a myth that cigarettes were addictive. There's tons of things medical science can't tell us or has yet to prove.

Peace,

Julie 8) 8) 8) 8)

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I don't believe I was unkind, if you go back and read the replies, you will see where the defensive came in and it wasn't from me, I just happened to respond to it..

I still believe this whole thing is a myth, but I guess that's my own opinion..

I just think it's sad that people with acne focus on their eating and even still, they are still getting acne, isn't that kinda contradicting, does noone see that this is not where the problem lies... If this were true, then noone would have acne, since all you'd have to do is eat healthy,, that's just not realistic..

Ok so maybe proactiv isn't for everyone, but it focuses on the real problems as to why we get acne and what to do about it.....

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Guest fatman_uk

Well its not really that u could jus eat healthy an get away zit-free but for some ppl it helps them.

Like, with me. Its mostly the INFLAMMATION of my skin that eatin less junk helps with for me, it dont make as much difference to the actual zit count, but it does help with my complexion. :shock:

I think one of the turning points to me gettin clear months ago was eatin healthy since my face was red an swelling all the time so i used less products on my face. Beofre when it was red an inflammed id use more stuff in panic to get it to go away... didn't work, lol.

Proactiv is the same tho, i personally aint tried it but ive heard mixed opinions, an most ppl who commented on these boards have either sed it don't work, or it does but costs too much.... how much is it anyhow? Jus curious... :?:

An yeah things applied to ur skin may be one focal point of the problem but the crap comes from the inside out dont it, it doesnt get planted in ur pores from the outside so doin sumthin on the inside can help, i mean, we wouldnt have antibiotics an accutane if it didnt help would we? Jus BP an the likes, hehe. :idea:

-Gaz

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