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ArcticMonkey

Hypopigmentation after dermabrasion

I had a second dermabrasion in April, Cheeks only, i'd previously had a full face dermabrasion in April 2005, which went well apart from obtaining a small scar on my chin, which is very much still there. Anyway since the first dermabrasion seemed to help my scarring slightly i opted to have it done again, not by Dr Yarborough this time though. I am currently 8 months post dermabrasion, and i'm feel extremely depressed, this dermabrasion hasn't went well, to begin with things were looking good, but now that the redness has completely subsided all i can see on my left cheek (this is the cheek that has the most scarring, although it was still fairly mild) it is now full of hypopigmentation, It would apperar that the doctor who done it went far to deep, my left cheek is no longer like skin, it is more like melted candle wax, it is white,poreless,thicker than normal skin. I have no idea what i am going to do, i feel so helpless, not to mention deformed, i have never in my life felt so ugly. I completely 100% regret getting this dermabrasion, i should have had the sence to stop after my first one. At this point in time i wish i didn't exist.

Now my skin is far beyond repair, i'm not just dealing with small indents anymore i am dealing with a white rough poreless scarred 'skin' it doesn't even look like skin anymore.......someone put me out of my misery :cry:

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I'm so sorry to hear that. I always thought that dermabrasion would be the answer for me until I started looking on these boards 2 years ago and realised I couldn't put myself through the risk.

Have you spoken to the doctor about the results?

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Hello; I understand where you're coming from. One cream, however, that people would never really think of using for hypopigmentation is tazorac. Yes it's a retinoid, and I'm not sure why, but tazorac works differently than say retin-a, but it is suppose to improve skin that has lost melanin.

http://www.avage.com/ProvenPower.html

http://www.allergan.com/site/products/cons...&largeText=

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Hey Miss Shady,

I believe I know exactly how you feel, although the extent of your damage is less than mine. A number of people here had disasterous results from dermbrasion, myself included. Basically my natural complexion was replaced by an unnatural looking mask, for a long time I felt I had lost the license to be a normal human being.

For me, it all started when someone casually commented on my pore scars when I was much younger. I think we have spent enough time feeling hurt by the look of our skin (first scars and then dermbrasion complications). I no longer research for procedures to restore my color because this is a viscious cycle that I swear I won't go through again.

Please release yourself and look forward. I believe in a few years, the spot on your cheek will become less apparent. At the mean time, please focus on building your life as I remember you are still in your early twenties. Take care.

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I'm so sorry to hear that. I always thought that dermabrasion would be the answer for me until I started looking on these boards 2 years ago and realised I couldn't put myself through the risk.

Have you spoken to the doctor about the results?

Hi, i haven't spoken to the doctor about what he is done, as i really don't know what to say, or what he could possibly say to me, also i can not go over to let him see it for himself as i stay in the united ingdom, and i got the dermabrasion done in America.

Does anyone have any idea what i could, do? i very much doubt i would get any money back either, i feel completely hopeless, i have never in my life felt so unbelievably depressed, i just dont see any way out of this hole, i hate what he has done to my face.

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I understand hypopigmentation is hard to treat. It was that risk that made me decide agsint either a derm or ablative lasers, plus adive of Doctos not to do it. I did a quick search and located this excerpt for an AAD newsletter. Also, your menlanocytes might return with time. Sun exposure could help turn this on with more melanin production form the remaining cells. I have had fraxel and feel that it produced a more even, tanned skin tone. If you have no proximate melanocytes (ie, entire areas is now devoid of these cells), it might be hard to regenerate these cells. Anyway, I would suggest avoding further ablative procedures and research the possibility of laser light therapy to stimulate melanin.

Vitiligo and Hypopigmentation

In recent studies, the excimer laser and intense pulsed UVB light source have also been demonstrated to repigment vitiligo and hypopigmented or white scars. Vitiligo is a skin condition of sharply bordered, white patches resulting from the loss of melanocytes, the skin pigment cells. Vitiligo affects 1 percent to 2 percent of the population, and approximately 50 percent of patients develop skin lesions before age 10. Vitiligo commonly affects the skin around the mouth and eyes and can be cosmetically disfiguring, particularly in dark-skinned individuals.

Until recently, available treatments including phototherapy, and topical or injected corticosteroids have been used with little success. Conventional phototherapy often requires treatment several times a week for up to a year to see visible improvement in coloration.

In a study of the 308 nm excimer laser, 29 patches of vitiligo were treated three times a week up to a maximum of 12 treatment sessions. Twenty-three patches of vitiligo received at least six treatments, resulting in some repigmentation in 57 percent of the patches. Of the 11 vitiligo patches that received all 12 laser treatments, 82 percent showed some repigmentation.

"The degree of repigmentation observed after two to four weeks of this therapy is significantly better than that achieved with conventional vitiligo therapy," said Dr. Kauvar.

In other studies, the 308 nm excimer laser, as well as the intense pulsed UVB light source, were shown to partially repigment white scars that developed following surgical procedures as well as laser resurfacing. Prior to the use of these methods, there was no known treatment to repigment skin. Treatment usually requires two sessions a week for five to ten weeks, and in some individuals, maintenance therapy may be necessary.

"The improvements seen in patients with these common skin disorders using new laser therapies are really remarkable," added Dr. Kauvar. "Ongoing clinical investigation should help to further optimize these novel techniques and apply them to the treatment of other skin conditions in the future."

Patients need to be aware that many states do not distinguish who can and cannot perform procedures with laser/light sources. "Since skin treatments using lasers can carry potential side effects, they should be performed by a qualified physician or under direct physician supervision. I encourage patients to ask their physician questions about who will be performing laser surgery, including their qualifications," cautioned Dr. Kauvar.

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Thanks billyboy for that informative reply, Regarding my skin the hypopigmentation isn't the biggest problem as i can kinda cover it with thick makeup, although what i cannot cover is the horrible texture the dermabrasion has caused, you can very clearly see where he went deeper, it would appear he made a bad job of feathering the skin at my jaw, and left cheek, to me, it just looks awful, so not only is thr skin SCARRED WHITE, it is also a disgusting texture,it's hard to explain. I wish i could turn back time, that way i would never EVER have had this dermabrasion.

I have no idea where to go from here...... :cry:

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I'm so sorry dear. Regret is such a nasty feeling. One I feel every day.

I just want to wish you luck, again i'm so sorry this had to happen to you. I think you should at least try to get your money back though.

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This procedure should really be outlawed. If people are having considerable issues and not being warned by doctors about the risks properly something must be done.

I believe so and if nobody else has done so the board of dermatology, the mayo clinic and others should be notified of an issue that could be blasted through the community of dermatology and dermatologic surgery.

It is possible that people with tragic results are never found out and their lives/quality of life can suffer extremely.

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Artic, a shot in the dark might be the use of the dermaroller to achieve a more natural look. You can do it at home for about $80 and I have never heard of any negative reactions. Also you may want to present your problem to Dr Pickart at SkinBiology, and see what he has to say.

http://healthyskin.infopop.cc/eve/forums/a/frm/f/7270023352 My name is Dazed on this site.

Address your question on the forum to Dr Pickart and he posts regularly on the forum. Browse the site as there is a ton of information.

http://www.reverseskinaging.com/

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I have rolling/box hypopigmentation scars on my temples. The texture is somewhat similar to how you are explaining yours. I've just derma rolled for the third time. I've noticed that the wrinkles created by the scars are gone. Also, the scars are more shallow now. Unless my eyes are deceiving me, I'm noticing color coming back to my hypo scars. It' only been my third time rolling too. If you haven't given dermarolling/dermastamp a shot yet, you should try it. Here's a link (along with countless dermaroller logs on acne.org) that inspired me to start rolling.

http://dermaroller.wordpress.com/2008/08/2...amp/#comment-63

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I looked at this...theres just too much risk of excessive scarring post op. The skin tends to go all yuk aswell...it never looks normal. The last thing we want to do is make the scaring worse. My rule of thumb is if there is even the slightest chance of things getting WORSE dont do it in the first place. Be happy with what you have !

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I'm so sorry to hear that. I always thought that dermabrasion would be the answer for me until I started looking on these boards 2 years ago and realised I couldn't put myself through the risk.

Have you spoken to the doctor about the results?

tattooing can make things worse if not done properly. It will never simulate proper skin look. Dermabrassion has very high risk of permanent skin color change.

If you get problems from a scar surgery the worst thing to do is continually fix it...law of diminishing returns...you create more and more problems.

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I'm so sorry dear. Regret is such a nasty feeling. One I feel every day.

I just want to wish you luck, again i'm so sorry this had to happen to you. I think you should at least try to get your money back though.

I totally agree...the procedure should be outlawed. I've had successful spot dermabrasion but I think my case was an anomaly...I also had an obsessive compulsive doctor which always helps lol. But knowing the risks I would never do this again (I only had VERY TINY parts done...2-3mm spots...perhaps contributing to the success -- much easier to control healing and results in small stages than in one big heap)

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i thought i should point out that this thread was made in 2006. artic monkey hasnt posted here since 2008. sadly the last thing that he or she posted was a thread titled "cant go on anymore". this breaks my heart!! its terrible how doing something to improve your appearance can ruin your life.

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i thought i should point out that this thread was made in 2006. artic monkey hasnt posted here since 2008. sadly the last thing that he or she posted was a thread titled "cant go on anymore". this breaks my heart!! its terrible how doing something to improve your appearance can ruin your life.

so sad, I hope artic monkey is doing well.

I think the doctors needs to stress this more "doing something to improve your appearance can ruin your life."

Its almost russian roulette sometimes and we as patients are sometimes mislead as to how severe the risks can be!

From my experience most of the best doctors dont actively seek patients, dont advertise, are booked out for 2-3 years in advance. So i guess its like any industry...theres only a handful that know what their doing and the rest are mediocre at best :(

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Scarspro.

tell me about your spot dermabrasion and your experience, how long it's been and your results/situation please.

had three spots done (2-3mm). Wasn't very deep, surgeon refused to go down too far. I was advised to use copper peptides and vaseline post op (replaced with aquaphor healing ointment). So i didn't let it scab to avoid infection etc.

They were very small spots and not near eachother. Basically the skin healed over in a few weeks and then some were still abit dented a few months later but they later healed up pretty well. Took about 12 months to heal completely altho most of the healing was done at 3 or so months.

Still you can have situations where the doctors go too far and then your left with more scaring and situations where it looks worse.

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Hello; I understand where you're coming from. One cream, however, that people would never really think of using for hypopigmentation is tazorac. Yes it's a retinoid, and I'm not sure why, but tazorac works differently than say retin-a, but it is suppose to improve skin that has lost melanin.

http://www.avage.com/ProvenPower.html

http://www.allergan.com/site/products/cons...&largeText=

can anyone confirm that what this poster said about tazorac is true? ive been reading up on it and cant find any info that backs this up.

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