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mintybailey

Milk - good fat or bad fat?

Im currently on Roaccutane and as it's supposed to be eaten with some form of fatty food and I mostly eat it with good fats like salmon, nuts, etc. I was just wondering would milk be considered a good fat or not? would it be best to stick to oily fish and avocados and stuff and not drink too much milk? Im just concerned because of the effect Roaccutane can have on cholesterol...

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Im currently on Roaccutane and as it's supposed to be eaten with some form of fatty food and I mostly eat it with good fats like salmon, nuts, etc. I was just wondering would milk be considered a good fat or not? would it be best to stick to oily fish and avocados and stuff and not drink too much milk? Im just concerned because of the effect Roaccutane can have on cholesterol...

Hello there!

On average milk is around 49% fat and around 60% of that is the bad saturated kind!

Cheese is around 74 % fat! Basically dairy products are bad and raise blood cholesterol levels but I still eat them.

When i was on accutane i didn’t really worry about this to much tho as the doctor said that i should only be worrying if i was taking the medicine over a long term period. I took accutane for 4 months and had a blood test at the end of the 4 months and everything was normal.

my acne has come back since coming of the accutane(about 9 months later). I don’t wish to put you off taking accutane as im sure your worried enough about the side effects. I have looked into accutanes effects a little more and there is a lot unknown about what it does to the body in the long run! Here is a link I have recently come across relating to some recent findings on accutane. There is a lot of jargon there but it’s possible to read between the lines.

http://www.max001.proboards42.com/

The information I got on fat content is from a book called ‘The Paleo Diet’ there is some very interesting information in there and it’s worth a look at. I recently bought it as I read that it may help battle acne? I am also trying a high vitamin B5 intake, using a blue/red light therapy lamp and drinking lots of water.

I hope this helped and that all goes well for you whatever treatment you use

All the best Tom

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Here's what Bryan had to say on the issue. (I'm leaving part of it out of the quote box so that it is more readable) You can find the original thread here: "MILK Sucks" Thread.

BRYAN WROTE:

Here's something I posted recently on another site about milk and milk products. Please read it carefully. Hopefully, it will challenge you to reconsider the common assumptions made by the public about heart disease:

For those of you who are convinced that the butterfat in milk is bad just because it's saturated, here's a passage from the great book Nutrition Against Disease by the famous biochemist Roger Williams (he's the scientist who discovered pantothenic acid, gave folic acid its name, and did lots of other original work on the B vitamins in his long career).

This is from the extensive notes in the back of his book to the chapter on heart disease. Also, please keep in mind that this isn't ALL the evidence he presents on the benefical effects of butterfat; if I were to type-out all that stuff, I'd be here typing all afternoon! :) All the italics in this passage are Williams' own. It's kinda long, but I hope all of you take the time to read it carefully:

Milkfat and processed milk

That cardiovascular lesions are not induced by the fat of whole milk, but may be caused by the lack of accompanying nutrients in processed milk products gains support from a number of controlled rat experiments. S. Dreizen and his coworkers (J. Nutr., 74:75, 1961) have shown that rats restricted to a diet of nonfat dry cow's milk induced atherosclerosis of the aorta and its major branches, together with a syndrome of accompanying afflictions in 50 percent of the animals.

Other investigators have demonstrated that rats reared on an exclusive whole milk diet supplemented with iron, iodine, manganese, and copper do not develop cardiovascular lesions (Kemmerer, A. R. et al. Am. J. Physiol., 102:319, 1932; McCay, C. M., et al. J. Gerontol., 7:61, 1952). This, incidentally, would be in agreement with those epidemiological studies of the African herdsmen tribes -- the Masai, Somalis, and Samburus -- who live almost exclusively on a milk-meat diet.

In one other experiment, Dreizen and his colleagues conducted a series of studies with ten groups of rats on different kinds of milk diets (J. Atheroscler. Res., 6:537, 1966). The results of these tests disclosed that rats reared on a diet of dry whole cow's milk (without supplements) developed overt atherosclerosis in 30 percent of the animals, while 40 percent succumbed to vascular lesions on a diet of nonfat dry milk. However, the investigators found that complete protection was afforded virtually all the animals against cardiovascular complications on diets of (1) reliquified whole milk; (2) dry whole milk supplemented with iron, copper, manganese, and iodine; (3) reliquified whole milk plus the trace elements; and (4) reliquified nonfat dry milk plus 3.6 percent sweet cream and the trace elements. These investigators assert that "a diet of nonfat dry milk, 3.5 percent butter, and the trace minerals gave almost complete protection, slight arteriosclerotic damage being found on histologic examination in only one of the thirty animals." They noted that neither the inception or prevention of atherosclerosis was related to cholesterol levels, nor, for that matter, to calcium or phosphorous levels.

These data suggest that adequate whole milk, including the butterfat, and essential trace minerals actually protect against cardiovascular damage. This, we have noted, concurs with other findings (Lowenstein, 1964; Mann, 1964; Shaper, Am. Heart J., 63:437, 1962) of the African tribes who live on a diet of raw whole cow's and goat's milk, a 60 to 65 percent butterfat diet, yet are virtually free of coronary heart disease. According to Dreizen and his colleagues, not only was the saturated butterfat of whole milk not to blame, but its inclusion in the diet was vital to the health of the cardiovascular system. It was the lack of adequate nutrients in a diet totally free of fat that caused medical atherosclerosis and renal damage. Butterfat, itself, appears to protect against atherosclerosis! More material on this subject will be presented later.

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