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it works for some people, unfortunately it, as well as any other bp i have used, didn't work for me.

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In my experience it worked when I was religiously using it. As soon as I stopped using it I broke out horribly -- no cure in my mind, just money wasted on something that controls acne, and only for some people.

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See my before and after pictures at http://www.propassiv.com

I started using Proactiv, a product of Guthy-Renker, in June 2005 to treat my mild acne. Over the next several months of using Proactiv, I suffered severe outbreaks of skin lesions that I had never experienced before using the product. When inquiring about these severe outbreaks, Guthy-Renker’s unlicensed medical support representatives advised me to continue using Proactiv and even sold me additional products that only worsened the situation.

With no improvements to my condition, in late November 2005, I stopped using Proactiv Solution. Despite the advice given to me by Proactiv representatives to continue treatment with Proactiv, I sought the professional care of a dermatologist to treat the severe outbreak of skin lesions. After consulting with the dermatologist, I was prescribed an expensive medication, which helped improve my condition. However, I have been left with permanent pit-scarring and skin discoloration on my face as a result of the irritation caused by my prior use of Proactiv Solution. I will need to have an expensive laser surgery procedure to reduce this skin discoloration with no guarantee that the damage can be reversed.

After watching numerous infomercials where celebrities would endorse a product, I never once questioned if these products were actually used by them. Yet, after I watched the infomercials for Proactiv Solution, it seemed like the celebrities not only used the product, they praised its ability to clear the skin of blemishes. When I was experiencing mild acne, I had high hopes for Proactiv, and the claims that the celebrities, and the company made. As you have read, the results were not favorable; not only was Proactiv uneffective, but it also caused permanent scarring, short term anguish and depression. This could have been avoided by knowledgeable representatives advising me to stop using the product and consult with a professional dermatologist. I urge anyone considering the use of this product to carefully re-evaluate their decision, and perhaps prevent a lifetime of pain and embarrassment as the result of using “The Answer for Acne.â€

See my before and after pictures at http://www.propassiv.com

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In theory, wouldn't it work? It's same benzoyl peroxide you leave on at the end.

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Well in theory, yes - in practice not so much. The difference is that Proactiv products are not designed for sensitive skin, and most people with acne prone skin have sensitive skin. The cleanser contains abrasive beads which can aggravate acne and the BP contains fragrance which can aggravate acne.

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Actually, the argument she gives in the article is that the products generally aren't strong enough to clear most people's skin - that the combination of products is on the right track, but just isn't strong enough to clear acne on most people and keep them clear.

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Proactive did work for me. I had nasty ugly cystic acne (mostly on my cheek bone area). The proactive cleared it up and really made my skin look great.

I stopped using several months ago (didn't want to keep paying and paying) and my skin doesn't look nearly as good. No huge cysts but not completely clear either.

Maybe oneday Ill start back on it.

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Actually, the argument she gives in the article is that the products generally aren't strong enough to clear most people's skin - that the combination of products is on the right track, but just isn't strong enough to clear acne on most people and keep them clear.

I disagree with her. It's the same strength as the BP for the CSR and that works well for most people unless the acne is pretty serious.

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Once, again

People answers about acne confound me. I am not a scientist but I know why pro-activ does not work on a repeated basis. Because it is obvious from scientific studies that bateria is proven to have a genetic resistance to certain chemicals once it is applied. If Benzoyl Peroxide is the only ingredient, and some Bacteria that survive, it will reproduce to make new off-spring that can also survive the chemical Benzoyl Peroxide. Thus Creating more havoc.

If You put 10% or Benzoyl Peroxide, that might burn your skin off. Which is not a safe way to treat acne.

The best way to treat Acne is to treat it like A virus. Multi concoction coctail that will make it difficult for bacteria for it to develop resistance. Any Scientist will say that. I don't understand why a scientist (bio-Chemist) hasn't spent enough research on this topic of Acne.

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squid, will you please cite these "scientific studies" that you claim? i would like to read your resources.

Once, again

People answers about acne confound me. I am not a scientist but I know why pro-activ does not work on a repeated basis. Because it is obvious from scientific studies that bateria is proven to have a genetic resistance to certain chemicals once it is applied. If Benzoyl Peroxide is the only ingredient, and some Bacteria that survive, it will reproduce to make new off-spring that can also survive the chemical Benzoyl Peroxide. Thus Creating more havoc.

If You put 10% or Benzoyl Peroxide, that might burn your skin off. Which is not a safe way to treat acne.

The best way to treat Acne is to treat it like A virus. Multi concoction coctail that will make it difficult for bacteria for it to develop resistance. Any Scientist will say that. I don't understand why a scientist (bio-Chemist) hasn't spent enough research on this topic of Acne.

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Because it is obvious from scientific studies that bateria is proven to have a genetic resistance to certain chemicals once it is applied. If Benzoyl Peroxide is the only ingredient, and some Bacteria that survive, it will reproduce to make new off-spring that can also survive the chemical Benzoyl Peroxide. Thus Creating more havoc.

Bacteria do not develop a resistance to BP - it's not an antibiotic. It works by increasing oxygenation in the pore beyond levels that anaerobic bacteria like P. acnes can tolerate.

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Because it is obvious from scientific studies that bateria is proven to have a genetic resistance to certain chemicals once it is applied. If Benzoyl Peroxide is the only ingredient, and some Bacteria that survive, it will reproduce to make new off-spring that can also survive the chemical Benzoyl Peroxide. Thus Creating more havoc.

Bacteria do not develop a resistance to BP - it's not an antibiotic. It works by increasing oxygenation in the pore beyond levels that anaerobic bacteria like P. acnes can tolerate.

It is an anti-biotic. In principle it releases oxygen killing off the anerobic Bacteria that thrive on non-oxygen environment. however, it is possible for the bacteria to develop resistance and studies like I will show later will prove my arguement.

Link : Scientific study done

Title

Benzoyl Peroxide with Erythromycin to Prevent Antibiotic- Resistant Bacteria in Acne

Erythromycin-resistant strains of Propionibacterium acnes, first described in the late 1970s, appear to be becoming a significant clinical problem. Researchers in Britain previously reported that 25% of patients at their large acne center have erythromycin-resistant P. acnes on their skin, and they recently showed that patients with predominantly resistant P. acnes fail to respond to oral erythromycin therapy. In an effort to ensure the continued efficacy of erythromycin in acne therapy, these researchers investigated whether benzoyl peroxide, a broad-spectrum antibacterial agent, adds to the antibacterial effect of erythromycin.

Benzoyl peroxide was tested alone and in combination with erythromycin against 40 erythromycin-sensitive and -resistant strains of Staphylococcus epidermis and proprionibacteria in vitro. In most of the bacterial strains, the combination of agents was no more effective in inhibiting the organisms than benzoyl peroxide alone.

Comment: P. acnes may have developed resistance to erythromycin, a bacteriostatic agent, as a result of the introduction of topical formulations in the late 1970s or from years of long-term systemic administration of the drug. The emergence of resistant strains poses a potentially significant problem in the management of patients with acne. This study shows that the combination of erythromycin and benzoyl peroxide is not synergistic against the majority of erythromycin-resistant propionibacteria. However, the combined use of topical benzoyl peroxide with either topical or systemic erythromycin should prevent selection for erythromycin-resistant skin bacteria and should also reduce the number of resistant strains already present on the skin. It appears rational, therefore, to avoid using unopposed erythromycin and to combine it with benzoyl peroxide.

— JS Dover

Published in Journal Watch Dermatology December 1, 1994

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Another Link:

Another study of Benzoyl Peroxide and erythromycin

Topical formulations of erythromycin and benzoyl peroxide are popular and effective treatments for mild to moderate acne vulgaris. Use of the former is associated with resistance gain in both skin propionibacteria and coagulase-negative staphylococci, whereas use of the latter is not. We evaluated the efficacy of a combination of erythromycin and benzoyl peroxide against a total of 40 erythromycin-sensitive and -resistant strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis and skin propioni- bacteria in vitro. Using the checkerboard technique, five erythromycin resistant strains of Propionibacterium acnes were inhibited synergistically or additively by the combination. Complete mutual indifference was exhibited between the drugs against the remaining 35 strains. However, erythromycin resistant staphylococci and propionibacteria were inhibited by the same concentration of benzoyl peroxide as erythromycin-sensitive strains. These results suggest that, although the combination of erythromycin and benzoyl peroxide is not synergistic against the majority of erythromycin-resistant staphylococci and propionibacteria, the concomitant therapeutic use of both drugs should counteract the selection of erythromycin-resistant variants and reduce the number of pre-existing resistant organisms on the skin of acne patients.

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Another study

Department of Dermatology, Hotel Dieu, Nantes, France. [email protected]

Topical antibiotics and benzoyl peroxide, are the two main topical antibacterial treatments indicated for mild-to-moderate acne vulgaris. Topical antibiotics act both as antibacterial agents suppressing Propionibacterium acnes in the sebaceous follicle and as anti-inflammatory agents. Benzoyl peroxide is a powerful antimicrobial agent that rapidly destroys both bacterial organisms and yeasts. Topical clindamycin and erythromycin have been proven to be effective against inflammatory acne vulgaris in concentrations of 1-4% with or without the addition of zinc. However, none of the antibacterials tested was more effective than benzoyl peroxide, which also has the advantage of not being associated with antimicrobial resistance.Topical antibacterial therapy should be discontinued once improvement is observed. If no improvement is observed within 6-8 weeks, the agent should be discontinued and a therapeutic switch considered. The primary limitation of benzoyl peroxide for some acne vulgaris patients is cutaneous irritation or dryness.Antibacterial therapy can be used in combination with other agents. Combining topical antibiotics and topical retinoids may enhance the efficacy, since the retinoid will improve the penetration of the antibiotic. Combining a topical antibiotic with benzoyl peroxide may increase the bactericidal effect of the antibiotic and reduce the potential for bacterial resistance. Topical and oral antibacterials should not be used in combination for the treatment of acne vulgaris, since this association may increase the risk of bacterial resistance.

PMID: 15481998 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Related LinksRandomised controlled multiple treatment comparison to provide a cost-effectiveness rationale for the selection of antimicrobial therapy in acne. [Health Technol Assess. 2005] PMID: 15588555 Topical antibacterial treatments for acne vulgaris : comparative review and guide to selection. [Am J Clin Dermatol. 2004] PMID: 15109272 Clindamycin/benzoyl peroxide gel: a review of its use in the management of acne. [Am J Clin Dermatol. 2002] PMID: 12069641 A randomized, double-blind, multicenter, parallel group study to compare relative efficacies of the topical gels 3% erythromycin/5% benzoyl peroxide and 0.025% tretinoin/erythromycin 4% in the treatment of moderate acne vulgaris of the face. [J Cutan Med Surg. 2003] PMID: 12362264 [Acne therapy with topical benzoyl peroxide, antibiotics and azelaic acid] [J Dtsch Dermatol Ges. 2006] PMID: 16638058 See all Related Articles...

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Here is a another link

Do you guys ever read this stuff?

Comparison on Combination vs. single topical aproach.

Here is another link

Percentages of sucess with comparison of combination therapy vs. Single topical therapy

Results: The best response rates were seen with two of the topical regimens (erythromycin plus benzoyl peroxide administered separately o.d. or in a combined proprietary formulation b.d.), compared with benzoyl peroxide alone, oxytetracycline (500 mg b.d.) and minocycline (100 mg o.d.), although differences were small. The percentage of participants with at least moderate improvement was 53.8% for minocycline (the least effective) and 66.1% for the combined erythromycin/benzoyl peroxide formulation (the most effective); the adjusted odds ratio for these two treatments was 1.74 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04 to 2.90]. Similar efficacy rankings were obtained using lesion counts, acne severity scores and global rating by assessor. Benzoyl peroxide was the most cost-effective and minocycline the least cost-effective regimen (ratio of means 12.3; difference in means −0.051 units/£, 95% CI −0.063 to −0.039). The efficacy of oxytetracycline was similar to that of minocycline, but at approximately one-seventh of the cost. For all regimens, the largest reductions in acne severity were recorded in the first 6 weeks. Reductions in disability scores using the Dermatology Quality of Life Scales were largest for both topical erythromycin-containing regimens and minocycline. The two topical erythromycin-containing regimens produced the largest reductions in the prevalence and population density of cutaneous propionibacteria, including antibiotic-resistant variants, and these were equally effective in participants with and without erythromycin-resistant propionibacteria. The clinical efficacy of both tetracyclines was compromised in participants colonised by tetracycline-resistant propionibacteria. None of the regimens promoted an overall increase in the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant strains. Systemic adverse events were more common with the two oral antibiotics. Local irritation was more common with the topical treatments, particularly benzoyl peroxide. Residual acne was present in most participants (95%) at the end of the study.

next Study

In our study the combination of benzoyl peroxide and clindamycin showed an excellent to good response in 95% of cases. Tucker et al,[7] have also reported improvement in 96% of cases using this combined therapy. Other workers have shown excellent to good response varying from 62% to 75% by using either benzoyl peroxide or clindamycin alone.

Best regards

Keith

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HAHAHA, excellent. Good work Squidi - but normally you can just ignore these people who ask for "scientific evidence" because I don't think they know how to google :)

Here is a another link

Do you guys ever read this stuff?

Comparison on Combination vs. single topical aproach.

Here is another link

Percentages of sucess with comparison of combination therapy vs. Single topical therapy

Results: The best response rates were seen with two of the topical regimens (erythromycin plus benzoyl peroxide administered separately o.d. or in a combined proprietary formulation b.d.), compared with benzoyl peroxide alone, oxytetracycline (500 mg b.d.) and minocycline (100 mg o.d.), although differences were small. The percentage of participants with at least moderate improvement was 53.8% for minocycline (the least effective) and 66.1% for the combined erythromycin/benzoyl peroxide formulation (the most effective); the adjusted odds ratio for these two treatments was 1.74 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04 to 2.90]. Similar efficacy rankings were obtained using lesion counts, acne severity scores and global rating by assessor. Benzoyl peroxide was the most cost-effective and minocycline the least cost-effective regimen (ratio of means 12.3; difference in means −0.051 units/£, 95% CI −0.063 to −0.039). The efficacy of oxytetracycline was similar to that of minocycline, but at approximately one-seventh of the cost. For all regimens, the largest reductions in acne severity were recorded in the first 6 weeks. Reductions in disability scores using the Dermatology Quality of Life Scales were largest for both topical erythromycin-containing regimens and minocycline. The two topical erythromycin-containing regimens produced the largest reductions in the prevalence and population density of cutaneous propionibacteria, including antibiotic-resistant variants, and these were equally effective in participants with and without erythromycin-resistant propionibacteria. The clinical efficacy of both tetracyclines was compromised in participants colonised by tetracycline-resistant propionibacteria. None of the regimens promoted an overall increase in the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant strains. Systemic adverse events were more common with the two oral antibiotics. Local irritation was more common with the topical treatments, particularly benzoyl peroxide. Residual acne was present in most participants (95%) at the end of the study.

next Study

In our study the combination of benzoyl peroxide and clindamycin showed an excellent to good response in 95% of cases. Tucker et al,[7] have also reported improvement in 96% of cases using this combined therapy. Other workers have shown excellent to good response varying from 62% to 75% by using either benzoyl peroxide or clindamycin alone.

Best regards

Keith

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A substance, such as penicillin or streptomycin, produced by or derived from certain fungi, bacteria, and other organisms, that can destroy or inhibit the growth of other microorganisms.

BP is not an antibiotic. It has anti-bacterial action, yes, but it's not an antibiotic - it's not derived from an organism.

And all those studies only confirmed my point - did you read them? They talk about bacteria developing a resistance to erythromycin (which is an antibiotic) and that BP was effective at inhibiting the bacterial growth even when the colony had developed resistance to the antibiotic. None of those demonstrated that bacteria develop a resistance to BP.

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BP is not an antibiotic. It has anti-bacterial action, yes, but it's not an antibiotic - it's not derived from an organism.

And all those studies only confirmed my point - did you read them? They talk about bacteria developing a resistance to erythromycin (which is an antibiotic) and that BP was effective at inhibiting the bacterial growth even when the colony had developed resistance to the antibiotic. None of those demonstrated that bacteria develop a resistance to BP.

Dear Been there done that,

If you read carefully at the percentages,

The number of peoplel that did well on Benzoyl Peroxide alone was around 64% to 76% while

The people on Combination therapy was at a much higher percentage around 94 to 96%. The evidence clearly means that it is safer to use a combination therapy though Benzoyl Peroxide is strong enough to overcome most Bacteria, It may not overcome all, which might read into the 64%-74% success rate with BP alone. What lies in the differences in the percentages? They didn't say. I can only conjecture..So what is your proof that Benzoyl Peroxide has a strong enough success rate used alone? compared with a combination therapy? Nor is there any proof in any of those earlier studies that examined the effects of BP alone. That would have been more insightful and more useful to us. However later Studies might lay some shed some light to my point that using BP alone without a combination of other P.acne fighting chemicals is not a smart and intuitive way of warding off the bacteria that causes these lesions.

I researched later about Benzoyl Peroxide. We do not know everything about its effect on the bacteria, only its observations. If we can start to analyze what how the bacteria is being killed off by the BP then you can start staking claim to your point that BP really is the wonder drung that it is. Because really I'm not buying it. And anyone with half a brain would try a new way to go about treating this disorder in a more well rounded approach. So BP alone will not suffice without the help other treatments.

A substance, such as penicillin or streptomycin, produced by or derived from certain fungi, bacteria, and other organisms, that can destroy or inhibit the growth of other microorganisms.

IC an Anti-Biotic derives from fungus or Bacterium. So Benzoyl Peroxide is an Anti-Bacterial. So you are correct. My apologies

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So what is your proof that Benzoyl Peroxide has a strong enough success rate used alone? compared with a combination therapy?

You should re-read those studies you posted, and this time look up the words that you don't understand.

Pay attention to the parts that were already conveniently underlined. Like:

In most of the bacterial strains, the combination of agents was no more effective in inhibiting the organisms than benzoyl peroxide alone.

Which means in most cases, BP has the strongest effect without any help, which also means that antibiotics alone do squat for the most part, and BP alone is at least as effective, for most strains.

However, erythromycin resistant staphylococci and propionibacteria were inhibited by the same concentration of benzoyl peroxide as erythromycin-sensitive strains.

This part means that even though the bacteria developed a resistance to an antibiotic, the BP could kill them anyway.

Combining a topical antibiotic with benzoyl peroxide may increase the bactericidal effect of the antibiotic and reduce the potential for bacterial resistance.

This part says that adding BP to an antibiotic may result in more dead bacteria in the short term, and in the long term - future bacterial colonies that are less resistant. Tell me again why it's so obviously bad to use BP?

If we can start to analyze what how the bacteria is being killed off by the BP then you can start staking claim to your point that BP really is the wonder drung that it is.

Quote where i called BP a "wonder drung".

However later Studies might lay some shed some light to my point that using BP alone without a combination of other P.acne fighting chemicals is not a smart and intuitive way of warding off the bacteria that causes these lesions.

Bacteria don't cause the lesions - the tendency of acne prone skin to blocking pores does. Everyone has P. acnes on their face, but not everyone has acne. Because only some people have a tendency for their pores to clog up with excess shed cells and keratin (look up desquamation and keratinization's effect on acne for further enlightenment), which forms a clog that allows the bacterial colony to feast and grow. They are opportunists. When faced with a glorious abundance of sebum (trapped from reaching the surface by the clog in the pore), the colony reproduces to fit the food supply, as bacterial colonies tend to do. But if the skin is not clogging, the colonies stay small and inobtrusive and the sebum exits harmlessly to the skin's surface.

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Dear Been there done that,

You don't need to lecture me on about the studies. I understood them well. Merely, I am showing you a guideline that Benzoyl Peroxide is not the Miracle drug that you think it may appear it to be. You did not have an anwer about the percentage differences of success with two different studies. you actually ignored it. what was your point in that?

As well, I am aware that BP with combination of erythromycin or Clindamycin have a synergistic like relationship. And some of the studies obviously proved that. Nowhere in the studies did it prove that BP alone could be sufficient as the lone cure for acne. Hence my point. Two studies that I revealed did shed light on it.

"However, erythromycin resistant staphylococci and propionibacteria were inhibited by the same concentration of benzoyl peroxide as erythromycin-sensitive strains."
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You don't need to lecture me on about the studies. I understood them well.

Then why do you imply that they support your point that bacteria can develop a resistance to BP when they in fact showed the exact opposite?

I am showing you a guideline that Benzoyl Peroxide is not the Miracle drug that you think it may appear it to be.

Quote where i ever said that.

For example, the erythromycin sensitive strains. Had the clients not have taken Erthromycin, the question would have been, what would have been the effect if BP was used on Erythromycin sensitive strains? How would the Bacterial colony adapt? What would be the percentage of success?

Ahem.

However, erythromycin resistant staphylococci and propionibacteria were inhibited by the same concentration of benzoyl peroxide as erythromycin-sensitive strains.

Nowhere in the studies did it prove that BP alone could be sufficient as the lone cure for acne.

No, they proved that BP does not cause bacterial resistance, which is what i've been saying all along. Of course BP alone is not enough to cure acne, because there is more to acne than bacteria. Abnormal desquamation and keratinization being something that BP can't effect (although topical retinoids can) - BP just reduced the inflammation that overgrown bacterial colonies cause.

You did not have an anwer about the percentage differences of success with two different studies. you actually ignored it. what was your point in that?

I ignored it because it had nothing do with my point, which is that BP does not cause bacterial resistance - you posted these studies to supposedly prove that it does, even though your studies show just the opposite. You seem to like to pretend like i made arguments that i never did.

Acne prone people like me have a higher concentration of oil production which leaves a feast for the P.Baceteria to feast on.

Only because your pores are clogged. If the pores are not clogged, the sebum exits to the skin normally and bacterical populations normalize. I have never claimed that BP alone is enough - the pore clogging has to be solved.

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Now, now children. Are you going to start behaving, or do we have to give you both a time-out? :naughty:

Something I don't think has been mentioned is that antibiotics do two things to reduce acne - kill bacteria and reduce inflamation. There have been a couple of studies (i"ll find the reference later - I don't have time to look for it at the moment) that have shown that even when the bacteria is resistent to the antibiotic, the antibiotic can still reduce acne lesions by simply reducing the inflamatory response of the skin. It could partially account for the additional benefits seen when combining the antibiotic with the BP. They also use low doses of doxycycline (dose is too low to kill the bacteria) to reduce inflamation in acne patients - a couple of studies have found this to be an effective method for treating acne.

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