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SmoothLover

1% Silver Sulfadiazine Cream (Rx) Excellent for burns

Last tuesday,a good neighbor of mine had an accident. She burned a large part of her neck and left arm with extremely hot water. She applied whatever burn cream she had available in her first aid kit but nothing helped. So 1 hour later with terrible pain she decides to call for help. She called me and I decided to take her to the nearest hospital because HUGE blisters started to form and she couldn't bear the pain. At the same time she was worried about the scars she was going to be left with. As soon as we got to the emergency room, they gave her a strong pain medicine and applied a cream over the affected area and then covered it with bandages. It was a severe second degree burn. On our way out, they gave us that cream to apply it at home once a day for 5 days. Long story short. I saw her this morning and NO SCARS AT ALL. She told me me that her skin started to peel off in a very nice way leaving a new baby skin underneath. She was so thrilled. This miracle cream was SILVER SULFADIAZINE. Known as SSD.

I highly oppose (TCA) chemical peels (fulll or Cross). I don't recomend it to anybody. Based on my personal experience and many member's on this board I think it's way too risky for a very low payoff. However, if you decide to do it, I think you should be very careful. There is a high risk of infection which can lead to additional scarring.

So , in order to avoid further complications, I think you should apply an anti bacterial cream/ointment and based on my neighbor's experience I think this cream may be of great help. Maybe you should have your doctor prescribe you this 1% Silver Sulfadiazine cream. I couldn't believe my eyes when I saw her this morning. I thought those huge blisters were going to leave her big ass scars. But thank God it didn't happen and I'm so happy for her.

Since it's a prescription-only cream it's stronger and more effective than over-the-counter products such as neospirin, etc.

This is what I found about this cream :

Indications And Clinical Uses :

For the adjunctive treatment of burns, skin grafts, incisions, leg ulcers and other clean lesions, abrasions, minor cuts and wounds. It is especially indicated in the treatment and prophylaxis of infection in serious burn victims.

Contra-Indications:

In patients with a history of hypersensitivity to silver sulfadiazine.:

Since sulfonamide derivatives are known to increase the possibility of kernicterus, silver sulfadiazine cream should not be used in pregnant women approaching or at term, in premature infants, or in neonates less than 2 months of age.

Warnings in Clinical States:

Silver sulfadiazine cream should be administered with caution to patients with a history of hypersensitivity to silver sulfadiazine. It is not known whether prior sensitivity to other sulfonamides will precipitate an allergic response to silver sulfadiazine cream.

Silver sulfadiazine cream should be used with caution in patients with a history of G-6-PD deficiency, as hemolysis may occur.

When treatment with silver sulfadiazine cream involves prolonged administration and/or large burn surfaces, considerable amounts of silver sulfadiazine are absorbed. Serum concentrations of sulfadiazine may approach adult therapeutic levels (8 to 12 mg %).

Precautions:

Following administration of silver sulfadiazine cream, absorption of sulfadiazine has been reported. In addition, small amounts of silver are absorbed over the course of repeated application of silver sulfadiazine cream. In extensively burned patients, serum sulfa concentrations and renal functions should be closely monitored.:

Silver sulfadiazine cream should be used with caution in patients with significant hepatic or renal impairment.

Leukopenia has been reported following the use of silver sulfadiazine cream, especially in patients with large burn areas (see Adverse Effects).

Drug Interactions :

Enzymatic Debridement: Silver sulfadiazine cream may inactivate topical enzymatic preparations used for debridement. Therefore, the use of concomitant systemic or alternative topical antimicrobial therapy should be considered.

Oral Hypoglycemic Agents and Phenytoin: Sulfa drugs may compete for the same degradation pathways utilized by some oral hypoglycemic agents and phenytoin. There is a possibility of half-life prolongation and decreased plasma clearance of these drugs, which may potentiate their activity.

Cimetidine: An increased incidence of leukopenia has been observed in patients receiving concomitant treatment with silver sulfadiazine cream and cimetidine.

Pregnancy: The safe use of silver sulfadiazine cream has not been established in pregnancy. The cream should be administered to pregnant women only when the physician decides that the potentially life-saving benefits of silver sulfadiazine therapy in the larger burn (extent greater than 20% body surface area) outweigh possible hazard to the fetus (see Contraindications).

Adverse Reactions:

:Leukopenia: Several cases of transient leukopenia have been reported in patients receiving silver sulfadiazine therapy. Leukopenia associated with silver sulfadiazine administration is primarily characterized by a decreased neutrophil count. Maximal white blood cell depression occurs within 2 to 4 days of initiation of therapy. Rebound to normal leukocyte levels follow onset of leukopenia within 2 to 3 days. Recovery is not influenced by continuation of silver sulfadiazine therapy. The incidence of leukopenia in various reports averages about 20% although an incidence as high as 55% has been noted.

Sulfonamides: During the treatment of burns over large body surfaces (greater than 20% body surface area), significant amounts of silver sulfadiazine are systemically absorbed. Therefore, it is possible that any adverse reactions associated with sulfonamides may occur.

Miscellaneous: A low incidence of other adverse reactions has been reported. This includes local burning sensation, rashes and pruritus, and rarely, interstitial nephritis

Symptoms And Treatment Of Overdose :

In extensively burned patients or in patients suspected of showing symptoms of excessive absorption, it is important to optimally maintain fluid balance to prevent dehydration and the associated possibility of renal impairment.

Dosage And Administration:

The cream should be applied to a thickness of at least 3 to 5 mm to burned surfaces once or twice daily. It is recommended that a protocol for management of the burn wound using accepted principles and techniques of debridement be followed. Silver sulfadiazine cream should be applied with sterile gloves. Silver sulfadiazine cream will provide antimicrobial activity when used with either open treatment or an occlusive dressing regimen. When treating patients using the open method, care must be taken to promptly reapply silver sulfadiazine cream whenever it is removed by patient movement.

The cream application should continue until either spontaneous healing or grafting of the burn wound is achieved.

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Have you used it yourself? Sounds interesting.

I haven't used it myself. However I did witness the wonders it did for my neighbor. I took her to the emergency room and I saw the blisters she had. And almost a week later, her skin healed so nicely and it didn't leave her any scars.

One of the many risks with high concentrations of TCA is infection,. It slowwwwwws down the healing process and can leave additional scarring.

Since a chemical peel is also a form of burn, this silver cream may be very helpful.

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SmoothLover is this why ur supposed to apply neosporin after cross? Just wondering b/c the next time I cross I was going to not use the neo b/c people say the scab stays on longer w/o it.

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SmoothLover is this why ur supposed to apply neosporin after cross? Just wondering b/c the next time I cross I was going to not use the neo b/c people say the scab stays on longer w/o it.

Yes, neosporin (like this silver cream) is an antibacterial and some guys use it to avoid the risk of infection associated with TCA use.

I wish I could tell you if neospirin has any effect on the duration of the scabs on your skin. But I do know that in most cases, the longer the scabs stay on, the better it is. The scabs protect the new skin that is forming underneath. That's why people should never try to force or peel off the scabs.

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I'm on my second round of cross on my cheeks, temples and chin and on the 12th day 70% of the scabs are still ON! With the exceptions of a few, they started falling on th 9th day.

I didn't put anything on. Just washing once a day and that's all. First time I just washed once a day and put cp on. They didn't last nearly this long.

I have to make it clear that most of my scars aren't very deep or wide and I wasn't particularly aggressive with the cross so it's not like the scabs are big and thick - they aren't but I went to great lengths to avoid taking them off. I also washed my face by regions to avoid the scabs to be wet and with cleanser on for too long.

It's definitely helping to keep them on.

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Have you used it yourself? Sounds interesting.

I haven't used it myself. However I did witness the wonders it did for my neighbor. I took her to the emergency room and I saw the blisters she had. And almost a week later, her skin healed so nicely and it didn't leave her any scars.

One of the many risks with high concentrations of TCA is infection,. It slowwwwwws down the healing process and can leave additional scarring.

Since a chemical peel is also a form of burn, this silver cream may be very helpful.

I also have seen people getting second degree burns and didn't get any scars, I always wondered what they used.

I'm not sure if it would work that well using it on our pitted scars after doing TCA peels. Hope it does.

I really don't understand all the possible side-effects you listed, but I sure don't like the sound of them.

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