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The Actress

Has anyone been diagnosed with a sugar intolerance or thought about it? hmm?

Both of you sound like me too! I get the shakes if I don't eat regularly, I get anxious easily and get sweaty hands when I do, and I need to wear a bite plate when I sleep because of all the grinding and clenching. I recently went to they gyno because I wasn't getting my period for 3 months at a time and she said I needed a blood test to check my insulin and glucose levels after fasting for 12 hours.

Has anyone else looked into this? I also have "anxiety", "depression", "hyperhydrosis" blah blah blah, from time to time. Someone has told me that this could be because of sugar! Anyone else with a similar situation? Supposedly sugar has a HUUUUGE part to do with the brain, etc etc etc

I feel ya... I have been tested because I get the shakes if I don't eat like every 3 hours. Sometimes I can't last 3 hours. I eat a good amount of protein and fiber with every meal so no one can say that's my problem. Anyways I got tested for low blood sugar and NADA I'm okay they say. WEIRD. SO yea I too have a hard core addiction to sweets, I live, breath, dream, and think about them 24/7.

Does any of you performed a glycemic curve GTT test?

If not you all have been misdiagnosed

Fasting glycemia and insulin are useless for your condition you need reactive tests

I really hope your doctors didn't really suggest a fasting glucose and insulin test for the symptoms you complained about because such ignorance is almost criminal

Here's the symptoms correlated to a positice GTT test:

- nervousness

- mood swings

- faintness

- fatigue (expecially afternoon)

- depression

- chronic craving for sweets

- cold hands and feet

- forgetfulness

- dizziness

- blurred vision

- sudden hunger

- shakiness

- crying spells

- panick attacks

All these symptoms are due to a condition called neuroglypenia which is caused by membranas intolerance to glucose loads. When cell membranas make themselves glucoseproofed by lowering the amount of glucose receptors on their surface the pancreased produces 50% more insulin trying to get the glucose into the cells Such burst of insulin causes a sudden drop in bioavailability to brain glucose

Unlike muscles, kidneys, liver and gut which can use glycogen to fuel themselves the brain has no glucose reverses and depends enterely on circulating blood sugar. When blood sugar levels decrease quickly the brain is therefore the first to suffer. Althought many cognitive symptoms are caused by the lack of available fuel for the brains other symptoms like fear, phobias, panick attacks and anxiety are caused by defense mechanisms activates when the circulating blood sugar is below a certain threshold

If you're positive to the GTT test the best diet to follow is one where you eat at least 6 times a day, small meals, higher in protein and moderate in non-refined carbs and devoid of refined carbs

Removing all carbs from your diet or going on a diet with less than 100 grams of carbs won't help you as it has been proven that such diet worsen a positive GTT test condition

Here's other DO's and DONT's of glucose load intolerance:

DON'T skip breakfast

DON'T go for more than three hours without eating

DON'T remove all carbs from diet or consume less than 100 grams of carbs daily

DON'T drink juices and beverages

DO have a before bedtime snack

DO always consume simple carbs with fats and proteins

DO increase B vitamins intake

DO increase C vitamin intake

This is very interesting for me because i have cold hands in the winter compared to other people.. i remember at college i had noticeabll colder hands and my friends hands were not (i had to check to see if it was the air con blowing at our hand level)

Sometimes when i suddenly get out my computer seat or sofa at home and walk somewhere ill feel very fatigued and ill have to grab onto something and sit on the floor for like 10 seconds.

I do skip breakfast!

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Both of you sound like me too! I get the shakes if I don't eat regularly, I get anxious easily and get sweaty hands when I do, and I need to wear a bite plate when I sleep because of all the grinding and clenching. I recently went to they gyno because I wasn't getting my period for 3 months at a time and she said I needed a blood test to check my insulin and glucose levels after fasting for 12 hours.

Has anyone else looked into this? I also have "anxiety", "depression", "hyperhydrosis" blah blah blah, from time to time. Someone has told me that this could be because of sugar! Anyone else with a similar situation? Supposedly sugar has a HUUUUGE part to do with the brain, etc etc etc

I feel ya... I have been tested because I get the shakes if I don't eat like every 3 hours. Sometimes I can't last 3 hours. I eat a good amount of protein and fiber with every meal so no one can say that's my problem. Anyways I got tested for low blood sugar and NADA I'm okay they say. WEIRD. SO yea I too have a hard core addiction to sweets, I live, breath, dream, and think about them 24/7.

Does any of you performed a glycemic curve GTT test?

If not you all have been misdiagnosed

Fasting glycemia and insulin are useless for your condition you need reactive tests

I really hope your doctors didn't really suggest a fasting glucose and insulin test for the symptoms you complained about because such ignorance is almost criminal

Here's the symptoms correlated to a positice GTT test:

- nervousness

- mood swings

- faintness

- fatigue (expecially afternoon)

- depression

- chronic craving for sweets

- cold hands and feet

- forgetfulness

- dizziness

- blurred vision

- sudden hunger

- shakiness

- crying spells

- panick attacks

All these symptoms are due to a condition called neuroglypenia which is caused by membranas intolerance to glucose loads. When cell membranas make themselves glucoseproofed by lowering the amount of glucose receptors on their surface the pancreased produces 50% more insulin trying to get the glucose into the cells Such burst of insulin causes a sudden drop in bioavailability to brain glucose

Unlike muscles, kidneys, liver and gut which can use glycogen to fuel themselves the brain has no glucose reverses and depends enterely on circulating blood sugar. When blood sugar levels decrease quickly the brain is therefore the first to suffer. Althought many cognitive symptoms are caused by the lack of available fuel for the brains other symptoms like fear, phobias, panick attacks and anxiety are caused by defense mechanisms activates when the circulating blood sugar is below a certain threshold

If you're positive to the GTT test the best diet to follow is one where you eat at least 6 times a day, small meals, higher in protein and moderate in non-refined carbs and devoid of refined carbs

Removing all carbs from your diet or going on a diet with less than 100 grams of carbs won't help you as it has been proven that such diet worsen a positive GTT test condition

Here's other DO's and DONT's of glucose load intolerance:

DON'T skip breakfast

DON'T go for more than three hours without eating

DON'T remove all carbs from diet or consume less than 100 grams of carbs daily

DON'T drink juices and beverages

DO have a before bedtime snack

DO always consume simple carbs with fats and proteins

DO increase B vitamins intake

DO increase C vitamin intake

This is very interesting for me because i have cold hands in the winter compared to other people.. i remember at college i had noticeabll colder hands and my friends hands were not (i had to check to see if it was the air con blowing at our hand level)

Sometimes when i suddenly get out my computer seat or sofa at home and walk somewhere ill feel very fatigued and ill have to grab onto something and sit on the floor for like 10 seconds.

I do skip breakfast!

It sounds like reduced glucose tolerance expecially the orthostatic low pressure when you suddenly get up

You may try to take small steps towards increasing your glucose tolerance and see if your feel better

Remove or drastically reduce refined carbs (white flour, pasta, sugar, sweets)

Count your carbs and try to consume 110 to 160 grams of carbs daily

Eat six time a day and small meals (your first small meal should be a breakfast and your last meal before bedtime) Try to eat one or two scrambled eggs for breakfast plus a carb like a fruit or whole starches

Consume simple carbs like fruits, honey and others with fats (like nuts) or protein

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OK so I have a sweet tooth, uhh yeah it's my bad habit, I also have acne and million other problems, I just dont' know WTF is wrong with me, i'm getting there though, slowly but surely! Has anyone else looked into this? I also have "anxiety", "depression", "hyperhydrosis" blah blah blah, from time to time. Someone has told me that this could be because of sugar! Anyone else with a similar situation? Supposedly sugar has a HUUUUGE part to do with the brain, etc etc etc

yes. I had the same symptoms along with knee pain and would have an emotional breakdown if I went too long without eating. I tried a low glycemic diet for a length of time to see if it would solve the problem. What I eventually wound up noticing was that the occasional pasta dish left me incredibly sleepy and bloated, while the occasional sugary dessert did nothing to me. I now follow a gluten-free diet (which has cleared up my acne btw) and take anti-depressants which have worked wonders for the anxiety. The low-glycemic diet I had been following before the meds didn't work on the anxiety or physical symptoms (though it wasn't a perfect diet - the guidelines I was following still allowed some pasta, etc, but it was much, much lower in glycemic index than my usual diet beforehand). I haven't tested myself Rx-free on a wheat-free diet, since the meds work perfectly for me with no discernible side effects - so I don't have a good enough incentive to try stopping them.

PS - Rice, which has a high glycemic index, does affect my depression. The 2 complete nervous breakdowns I had before going on meds came after eating meals high in rice for 2 days in a row. It was the 2nd of these times that I wound up at my doctor's office in tears asking for the meds. I do not avoid rice now however. I just won't eat it often or more than once in a row (doggy bags from Indian or Thai restaurants are a no-no for me).

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OK so I have a sweet tooth, uhh yeah it's my bad habit, I also have acne and million other problems, I just dont' know WTF is wrong with me, i'm getting there though, slowly but surely! Has anyone else looked into this? I also have "anxiety", "depression", "hyperhydrosis" blah blah blah, from time to time. Someone has told me that this could be because of sugar! Anyone else with a similar situation? Supposedly sugar has a HUUUUGE part to do with the brain, etc etc etc

yes. I had the same symptoms along with knee pain and would have an emotional breakdown if I went too long without eating. I tried a low glycemic diet for a length of time to see if it would solve the problem. What I eventually wound up noticing was that the occasional pasta dish left me incredibly sleepy and bloated, while the occasional sugary dessert did nothing to me. I now follow a gluten-free diet (which has cleared up my acne btw) and take anti-depressants which have worked wonders for the anxiety. The low-glycemic diet I had been following before the meds didn't work on the anxiety or physical symptoms (though it wasn't a perfect diet - the guidelines I was following still allowed some pasta, etc, but it was much, much lower in glycemic index than my usual diet beforehand). I haven't tested myself Rx-free on a wheat-free diet, since the meds work perfectly for me with no discernible side effects - so I don't have a good enough incentive to try stopping them.

PS - Rice, which has a high glycemic index, does affect my depression. The 2 complete nervous breakdowns I had before going on meds came after eating meals high in rice for 2 days in a row. It was the 2nd of these times that I wound up at my doctor's office in tears asking for the meds. I do not avoid rice now however. I just won't eat it often or more than once in a row (doggy bags from Indian or Thai restaurants are a no-no for me).

A low glycemic-index is not that useful if you've reactive problems of glucose intolerance

In fact than the glycemic index you should care more for the glycemic load

For someone with lowered glucose tolerance high glycemic index carbs is less of a problem, in fact even a food which is low on the glycemic index but high in the glycemic load is the one to avoid. On the other hand a food high on the glycemic index but low in the glycemic load is a good you can consume without side effects. That's also the reason why bigger meals are divided into many small meals, to reduce the load. Big meals are known to increase glucose intolerance, post prandial glycemia and lipemia

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