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tofupalace

B3/niacin, interesting study

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as found in link

Draelos ZD, Matsubara A, Smiles K.

Department of Dermatology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27262, USA. [email protected]

BACKGROUND: The presence of sebum on the face is responsible for both facial shine and the formation of comedonal and inflammatory acne lesions. Sebum control is a goal of many OTC skin care products; however, most currently available products function by absorbing sebum from the face rather than modulating its production. OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate the effect of topical 2% niacinamide on sebum excretion rates and casual sebum production in Oriental and Caucasian populations. METHODS: Separate clinical trials were conducted in both Japan and the USA to evaluate the effect of topical 2% niacinamide in different ethnic groups. A total of 100 Japanese subjects were enrolled in a double-blind, placebo-controlled comparison between two independent balanced groups. Fifty subjects applied the 2% niacinamide moisturizer to the face for 4 weeks and 50 subjects used a placebo moisturizer for 4 weeks, with sebum excretion rate (SER) measurements taken at baseline, week 2, and week 4. In addition, 30 Caucasian subjects were enrolled in a randomized split-face study for 6 weeks with SER and casual sebum levels (CSL) measured at baseline, week 3, and week 6. RESULTS: The results of the Japanese study demonstrated that the SER of the two groups was not significantly different at baseline, but the 2% niacinamide treated group demonstrated significantly lowered SER after 2 and 4 weeks of application. The results were somewhat different in the Caucasian study. After 6 weeks of treatment, the CSL was significantly reduced, but the SER was not significantly reduced. CONCLUSIONS: Topical 2% niacinamide may be effective in lowering the SER in Japanese individuals and CSL in Caucasian individuals.

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ok, after doing some more checking, apparently you can buy this stuff, been out for a while. saw a few %4 niacinamide gels/creams, although i can't seem to find a very reliable vendor for these. i would imagine you could make this stuff without too much difficulty... anyone had any experience with topical niacinamide?

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I don't really believe this would be effective in any significant way really, just because external topicals can't really have that much impact on sebum production imo. I notice they don't say what the reduction was or the percentage or anything, so forgive me if I'm a bit sceptical ;).

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yeah I made a post asking if anyone had used niacinamide in the general acne post area and the prescription area.

heres' my post:

i remember using niacinamide gel years ago and it worked as well as BP. the only reason i quit using it was because i ran out and couldn't afford to buy another bottle of it at the time, and eventually forgot about it. i've been seeing it mentioned here a few times in the past. you guys may or may not know there was a study conducted in '95 that showed niacinamide gel to be more effective then a topical antibiotic, and with less side effects as well. in another study it has been showed to have similar effects as retinoids on improving skin tone / quality, but without the peeling and redness that we all have come to associate retinoids with. so has anyone used it? i just ordered a bottle of metazene, google it and you'll find a few stores that sell it.

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did you notice any reduction in sebum? weird how the study in '95 makes no mention of it, and the study in '06 doesnt mention the anti-inflammatory effects.

link

i did some more looking around and the author of this page says you can make a niacinamide gel/cream using niacinamide from a supplement and aloe vera or basic cream as a vehicle. couldnt find a store locally that sells niacin in the form of niacinamide though...

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I couldn't find straight B3 powder and didn't want to have the fillers in the pills on my skin, so I just bought Metazene. Google it. It's about 20 bucks, but when I got a prescription for it years ago I paid twice that. Anyways I hope it comes soon...

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Alright, I got my Metazene (B3 gel) in the mail today and have just started using it. But my acne is almost cleared up anyway from nutritional/holistic means, but we'll see if this keeps me clear for good. My skin is mostly a few scattered small whiteheads that have come to a point, and healing now.

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Alright, I got my Metazene (B3 gel) in the mail today and have just started using it. But my acne is almost cleared up anyway from nutritional/holistic means, but we'll see if this keeps me clear for good. My skin is mostly a few scattered small whiteheads that have come to a point, and healing now.

let us know if you notice any effects on the oilyness of your skin (if you have any), i'm pretty interested in this stuff

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So are you planning on using it for oilyness and not acne?

So far I've noticed this: no new breakouts, everything else is healing. Again, I'm pretty positive this is due to what I've done internally / holistically. I guess the main reason for gettign the B3 was that I remember it working before, and I can fall back on it if for some reason I start breaking out again.

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Olay make a couple of moisturisers that contain niacinamide, Regenerist Rehydrating lotion and Complete Multi Radiance Fluid. The Regenerist stuff is ok, but has a slight tendency to make me break out.

There's also Freederm:

Website

The Freederm gel was pleasant enough to use at least - I found that it made my oil levels rise rather than fall though. Don't know if this is just me - if you could harvest the amount of oil my skin makes, you could use it as a replacement for Castrol.

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you could harvest the amount of oil my skin makes, you could use it as a replacement for Castrol.

haha, same here. by 5pm i can literally collect drops of it. i got a free sample of those oil-absorbing sheets once--i totally saturated a sheet on just my forehead alone! my hair is also really oily.

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I couldn't find straight B3 powder and didn't want to have the fillers in the pills on my skin, so I just bought Metazene. Google it. It's about 20 bucks, but when I got a prescription for it years ago I paid twice that. Anyways I hope it comes soon...

I made my own B3/niacinamide/nicotinamide gel, even though I couldn't find any pure nicotinamide at the health food store. I'm an amateur chemist, so that's not a problem. The stuff I bought is Vitamin Shoppe brand, and contains niacinamide and magnesium stearate inside gelatin capsules. The magnesium stearate is included as a flowing agent, which is why it's also included in stuff like baby powder. It's perfectly harmless, but maybe you don't want it on your skin anyway, which is cool. Here's how I made my own homemade, dirt-cheap nicotinamide gel.

Nicotinamide is very soluble in water. Magnesium stearate isn't. I popped open about 20 gelcaps, and dumped it into about 150 ml of water. I boiled it in the microwave, stirred some, boiled and stirred some more. At a certain point you can see that most of the stuff has dissolved, leaving behind the magnesium stearate. Now just pour the liquid through a coffee filter, and you'll be left with a pretty pure solution of nicotinamide. From there, mix it into whatever you want - your favorite moisturizing lotion, aloe gel, whatever. Aim for 4% nicotinamide, since that's what all the studies have used.

I made about seven ounces of 4% nicotinamide gel, and the materials cost me about $2.00. That's way cheaper than the commercial stuff, and it was super-easy to make.

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http://www.healthtouch.com/bin/EContent_HT...&cid=htdrug

NIACINAMIDE (On the skin)

Niacinamide (nye-a-SIN-a-mide)

Reduces dryness, redness, or irritation of your skin caused by acne or acne medicines.

Brand Name(s):Nicomide-T

There may be other brand names for this medicine.

When This Medicine Should Not Be Used:

You should not use this medicine if you have had an allergic reaction to niacinamide.

How to Use This Medicine:

Cream, Gel/Jelly

Your doctor will tell you how much of this medicine to use and how often. Do not use more medicine or use it more often than your doctor tells you to.

This medicine is for use on the skin only. Do not get it in your eyes, nose, or mouth. Do not use it on skin areas that have cuts or scrapes. If it does get on these areas, rinse it off right away.

Wash your hands with soap and water before and after using this medicine.

Before using this medicine, wash your face with a mild soap or a cleansing lotion as directed by your doctor.

Apply a thin layer to the affected area. Rub it in gently.

You may apply cosmetics or other acne medicines over this medicine if desired.

This medicine does not treat acne. Keep using all other acne medicines as directed by your doctor.

If a dose is missed:

If you miss a dose or forget to use your medicine, apply it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, wait until then to apply the medicine and skip the missed dose. Do not apply extra medicine to make up for a missed dose.

How to Store and Dispose of This Medicine:

Store the medicine at room temperature, away from heat and direct light. Do not freeze.

Ask your pharmacist, doctor, or health caregiver about the best way to dispose of the used medicine container and any leftover medicine after you have finished your treatment. You will also need to throw away old medicine after the expiration date has passed.Keep all medicine away from children and never share your medicine with anyone.

Drugs and Foods to Avoid:

Ask your doctor or pharmacist before using any other medicine, including over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products.

Warnings While Using This Medicine:

Make sure your doctor knows if you are pregnant or breast feeding.

Do not use this medicine for a skin problem that has not been checked by your doctor.

Your doctor will need to check your progress at regular visits while you are using this medicine. Be sure to keep all appointments.

Possible Side Effects While Using This Medicine:

If you notice these less serious side effects, talk with your doctor:

Mild skin rash.

If you notice other side effects that you think are caused by this medicine, tell your doctor.

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You can order Nicomide-T Cream and Gel with 4% Nicotinamide for acne blemishes. 1.05 oz (30 grams) cream here:

http://www.prxotc.com/detail.aspx?ID=2352

Nicomide-T Cream and Gel with 4% Nicotinamide for acne blemishes. 1.05 oz (30 grams) cream

Uses: Information for the Consumer Nicomide-T Cream is a fragrance-free emollient topical cream that helps to improve the appearance of acne blemishes as well as reduce the visible manifestations of inflammation and irritation that may result from the use of certain prescription and over-the-counter acne medications.

Used as directed, Nicomide-T Cream can help: Decrease the redness associated with acne blemishes Make acne blemishes appear less inflamed Moisturize facial skin that is excessively dry due to the use of prescription or over-the-counter acne medications Improve the visible manifestations of inflammation and irritation that can result from the use of prescription or over-the-counter acne medications Nicomide-T Gel is a fragrance-free alcohol-based gel that helps to improve the appearance of acne blemishes. Used as directed by a physician, Nicomide-T Gel can help: Decrease the redness associated with acne blemishes Make acne blemishes appear less inflamed Reduce excessive skin oiliness Improve the appearance of the inflammation and irritation that can result from the use of prescription or over-the-counter acne medications

Ingredients: Nicomide-T Cream contains purified water, C12-15 alkyl benzoate, titanium dioxide, polyhydroxystearic acid, nicotinamide, glycerin, cetearyl ethylhexanoate, neopentyl glycol diethylhexanoate, sorbitan stearate, glyceryl stearate, PEG-100 stearate, self emulsifying wax, cetyl dimethicone, cyclomethicone, neopentyl glycol diisostearate, sucrose cocoate, aluminum stearate, alumina, xanthan gum, cetyl alcohol, hydrogenated castor oil, benzyl alcohol, and nicotinic acid. Nicomide-T Gel contains puri?ed water, SDA Alcohol 40B, laureth-12, nicotinamide, magnesium aluminum silicate, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, citric acid and nicotinic acid. All Nicomide-T Cream and Nicomide-T Gel ingredients are non-comedogenic and hypoallergenic.

Instructions for use:

1. Wash face with a mild facial cleanser or other cleansing product prescribed by a physician.

2. Apply a thin layer of Nicomide-T Cream or Nicomide-T Gel to the affected area twice daily or as directed by a physician.

3. Makeup and acne medications may be applied over Nicomide-T Cream or Nicomide-T Gel.

4. After using Nicomide-T Cream or Nicomide-T Gel for 8-12 weeks, it is recommended that you follow up with your dermatologist for an evaluation of the improvement in your appearance. For Topical Dermatological Use Only; Keep Nicomide-T Cream and Nicomide-T Gel away from eyes. Nicomide-T Cream has virtually none of the troublesome side effects (e.g., dryness, burning, and irritation) commonly associated with the use of prescription or over-the-counter acne medications. Nicomide-T Gel has virtually none of the troublesome side effects (e.g., redness and irritation) commonly associated with the use of prescription or over-the-counter acne medications.

Because Nicomide-T Cream and Nicomide-T Gel are not antibiotics, their use will not contribute to development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. In multicenter clinical studies of topical nicotinamide, involving more than 1000 subjects, 80%-90% of those who applied Nicomide-T for 8 to 12 weeks were judged by dermatologist investigators to have clinically observable improvement in appearance.1-3 Store between 15°-30°C (59°-86°F). Do not freeze.

Distributed by: Sirius Laboratories, Inc. 100 Fairway Drive Vernon Hills, IL 60061

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Homemade Niacinamide (B3) Gel Recipe

Go to your local health food store and purchase the following:

Niacinamide 500 mg (Solaray comes in powder filled gel capsules)

Pure Aloe Vera Gel (no added colors or methyl/parabens)

Empty 2 oz. cream jar

To Make:

Squeeze 2 oz. of Aloe Vera Gel into empty cream jar

Empty five capsules of Niacinamide into cream jar

Stir mixture until powder is disolved and well mixed

Enjoy!

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wow... old thread!

just an update on my experience with a topical niacinamide gel... been using it for almost a year. seems to have some anti-inflammatory properties. hasnt done a thing as far as sebum production. oh well :\

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never tried any oral niacinamide.. havent seen anything to suggest it would have an impact on sebum.. some evidence suggesting it has a positive effect on acne though.

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4% Niacinamide face cleansing pads are available on Amazon.com. I suggest giving it a try. Niacinamide has proven anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial properties. Clinical studies has shown it to be equal or better than antibiotics (plus no side effects). Since the niacinamide is applied locally, it works faster. Scrubbing agents also help open clogged pores for improved effect

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16871774

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17147561

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7657446

(taken off website offering these pads)

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