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bornunderabadsign

Question about smoking and scars

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Since I will be getting treatments going in the next couple months I finally quit smoking after 10 years. It was easier then I thought. I have read that its better to not smoke when getting work done on your skin because it heals better or something when getting the subcisions and that stuff? Anybody know if it takes a lengthy amount of time before your skin heals normally after quitting smoking or if this goes right into effect?

Thanks for your time.

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Smoking is bad because it literally slows down collagen production; therefore, any procedure that you get done is prone to not be as effective. Many people don't know this, but if you are on SSRI anti-depressant, the same thing is true. The high amounts of cortisol that are deposited in the bloodstream due to high seratonin amounts in the brain also slow down collagen production. Cortisol is the "aging" hormone. Dr. Perricone writes about this in his book at great length. But I had a friend on Paxil for 2 1/2 years and her skin changed dramatically during that time (she aged overnight). I'm adding in the thing about SSRI's because most people aren't aware of it.

I'm glad that you have stopped smoking, though. You might have a better go at proper collagen stimulation when getting your scars worked on.

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Guest ObiWontonKenoli

That's a new fact about collagen, Denise...I always hear people say stuff like smoking is bad for your skin, period. But my brother smokes like a pack a day (I don't know about now, could be more or less). but damn, he's five years older than me (he's 36) but he got a skin of an early 20s...NO scars, NOTHING...I don't smoke a cigarette ever (okay..a couple packs and that was 10 years ago...that's it). but my skin is much worse. than his :-k

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Hey Obi....it'll all show up probably when he's in his forties. That's usually what happens. But you know, studies have been done on heavy smokers and wound healing and it's definate that heavy smokers heal slower and their collagen production slows down. Smoking actually shuts off oxygen from getting into skin cells.....bad stuff in terms of aging people more quickly and shutting off collagen production.

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Yeah.. smoking sucks.. that's why I've done it for 25 years ](*,) ](*,) ](*,) ..

The ones who have seen my photos will vouch that I have pretty good skin tone, no wrinkles etc.. most people think I am 10 years younger than my 40 years of age..

But.. to compensate for smoking (I'm bad alright), I have always been an exercise fanatic doing 4-7 classes a week (in the last few years, I have steadily moved away from step/gym/martial arts to yoga/qigong/taichi)..so my oxygen flow is pretty good.... still, I spoke with my b/f and we both think we need to give up smoking this year - so I am getting myself together to prepare for the letting go..

Still, I know I could do much, much better for myself if I gave up.

Everytime I see a post related to smoking, my heart misses a beat.

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Guest ObiWontonKenoli

Good luck with your effort in quitting smoking Maya...sending good thoughts to you! [-o<

Why you move away from Taichi and stuff, I thought those are good for you?

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Sorry Obi.. - I moved TOWARDS taichi, qigong and yoga - I love all those classes. My yoga instructor trained with Madonnas yoga instructor - (I am able to get my body into all those hot positions :-$ )

Doing these types of exercises has given me a much better shape than

all that pumping and huffing I used to do at the gym!

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Guest Tracy

I'm a smoker too.....quit for a few years and then went back to it about 8 or 10 months ago. I need to quit......

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Guest Cubsfan

just take a look at the facial skin of the red hot chilli peppers...they've been smoking all kinds of stuff for decades and you can see their scars and deep wrinkles.

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Thanks for the info guys. Smoking is something else. Its one of about 3 things in life I enjoyed. But getting my skin helped would help me enjoy it more at this point so it had to go. And cubsfan I only have one thing to say to you. CURSE OF THE BILLY GOAT.

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I've read that smoking saps your body of vitamin c. If you do decide to smoke, might want to take supplements. I'm a drinking smoker, just doesn't seem right to do the first without the latter. When I do smoke I try to do it outside or in some kind of an open space, as I find being in a room with smoke irritating. I've also found that if I shave right before I go out my skin is more sensitive to smoke, so I usually shave the night before.

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This post really got me thinking hard.

I know I am doing myself a very poor service with my smoking - and it is definately giving me poorer results than others with needling/subcision/excision.

The thing is, I can't say..'it didn't work etc..' if I continue to smoke, because I am the one throwing the iron into the fire.. it's not fair, at this stage, to blame anyone but myself.

It's more than possible that my smoking is just killing off the collagen needed to raise my pits/picks post procedure/surgery.. and also that's why I am not responding too well to NLite (I've had 4 with no/limited success)....

so..anyways.. I have decided to get help biggrin.gif

I thought about this long and hard - for me, I don't think it's difficult to quit smoking, but everytime I have tried.. by about week 2-3, I put on a lot of weight - then I make the decision that being a smoker is better than being overweight.. so I start again and I loose the weight.. and the evil circle continues.

I have been in contact with a company called Helping Hand, who offer hypnotherapy and NLP amongst various things - they said that I should go for 3 sessions - 1st 2 will work on my limiting beliefs, stress and weight stuff etc... (all the stuff that keeps me smoking) .. 3rd session is purely on smoking.

Sessions:

1st - 30th October

2nd - 6th November

3rd - 13th November - give up smoking day!!!

Will update as I progress. Please keep your fingers crossed for me. Thanks!

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Thanks Denise biggrin.gif

I'm going to start doing some research on the net - this will help motivate me as to the benefits of giving up.

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Cutaneous Biology

Smoking affects collagen synthesis and extracellular matrix turnover in human skin

A.Knuutinen, N.Kokkonen* J.Risteli K.Vähäkangas M.Kallioinen§ T.Salo* T.Sorsa¶ and A.Oikarinen

SummaryBackground Smoking is associated with premature facial wrinkling and aberrant wound healing, but the underlying mechanisms of skin injury are poorly understood.

Objectives To compare the in vivo collagen synthesis and degradation in the skin of smokers and non-smokers.

Methods The study population consisted of 47 current smokers and 51 individuals who had never smoked from northern Finland. Suction blisters were induced in the sun-protected upper inner arm of the study subjects, after which suction blister fluid (SBF) was collected for analyses of the levels of aminoterminal procollagen propeptides of type I and III collagens (PINP and PIIINP, respectively), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-8 and tissue inhibitor of MMP (TIMP)-1. PINP, PIIINP and TIMP-1 were also determined from serum samples. The levels of active and pro MMP-1 were assessed from deep-frozen skin biopsies by Western blotting.

Results The synthesis rates of type I and III collagens were lower by 18% and 22%, respectively, in the SBF of the smokers compared with the non-smokers. The levels of MMP-8 were higher by 100% in the SBF of the smokers. The levels of MMP-1 in the skin biopsies did not differ significantly between the groups. The levels of TIMP-1 in SBF were 14% lower in the smokers than in the non-smokers, whereas the serum concentrations of TIMP-1 did not differ between the groups.

Conclusions Smoking decreases the synthesis rates of type I and III collagens in skin in vivo and alters the balance of extracellular matrix turnover in skin.

http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/openurl?g...sue=4&spage=588

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Quitting Smoking Helps Wounds Heal Faster

7/28/2003

People who quit smoking for a month after having surgery enjoy a markedly shorter recovery period than those who continue to smoke, according to Danish researchers.

Reuters reported July 25 that researcher Lars Tue Sorensen and colleagues from Bispebjerg University Hospital in Copenhagen looked at 78 people who recently had small incisions -- some smokers, some not. Half of the smokers were allowed to continue, while the rest abstained, some using a nicotine patch.

The study found that 12 percent of smokers' wounds become infected, compared to 2 percent of non-smokers. Also, 12 percent of smokers had their wounds break open, while none of the non-smokers experienced this complication.

Moreover, follow-up examinations showed that smokers who quit for at least four weeks post-surgery had fewer infections than those who continued to smoke. Both nicotine-patch and placebo users who remained abstinent reaped health benefits, researchers said.

An accompanying commentary by a pair of Stamford University physicians said the study suggested that "surgeons need to be even more active in recommending smoking-cessation programs to their patients because the impact of smoking on even minor incisions can be significant."

The study was published in the July 2003 issue of the Annals of Surgery.

Sorensen, L., Karlsmark, T., & Gottrup, F. (2003) Abstinence From Smoking Reduces Incisional Wound Infection: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Annals of Surgery, 238(1): 1-5.

Yang, G., & Longaker, M. (2003) Abstinence From Smoking Reduces Incisional Wound Infection: A Randomized, Controlled Trial. Annals of Surgery, 238(1): 6-8.

http://www1.jointogether.org/sa/news/summa...,565785,00.html

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Smoking and wound healing.

Silverstein P.

University of Oklahoma Health Science Center, Oklahoma City.

The association between cigarette smoking and delayed wound healing is well recognized in clinical practice, although extensive controlled studies have yet to be performed. The documented effects of the toxic constituents of cigarette smoke--particularly nicotine, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen cyanide--suggest potential mechanisms by which smoking may undermine expeditious wound repair. Nicotine is a vasoconstrictor that reduces nutritional blood flow to the skin, resulting in tissue ischemia and impaired healing of injured tissue. Nicotine also increases platelet adhesiveness, raising the risk of thrombotic microvascular occlusion and tissue ischemia. In addition, proliferation of red blood cells, fibroblasts, and macrophages is reduced by nicotine. Carbon monoxide diminishes oxygen transport and metabolism, whereas hydrogen cyanide inhibits the enzyme systems necessary for oxidative metabolism and oxygen transport at the cellular level. Slower healing has been observed clinically in smokers with wounds resulting from trauma, disease, or surgical procedures. The reduced capacity for wound repair is a particular concern in patients undergoing plastic or reconstructive surgery. Compared with nonsmokers, smokers have a higher incidence of unsatisfactory healing after face-lift surgery, as well as a greater degree of complications following breast surgery. Smokers should be advised to stop smoking prior to elective surgery or when recovering from wounds resulting from trauma, disease, or emergent surgery.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.f...8&dopt=Abstract

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Poor wound healing

Clinicians have long suspected that smoking has a deleterious effect on healing wounds, especially postsurgical flaps and grafts. In 1977, Mosely and Finseth demonstrated the detrimental effect of smoking on healing hand wounds. Many studies have since confirmed that smoking is harmful to a healing wound.

Goldminz and Bennett reviewed 916 flaps and full-thickness grafts and found that 1-pack-per-day smokers had 3 times the frequency of necrosis as nonsmokers and that 2-pack-per-day smokers had necrosis 6 times more frequently than nonsmokers.

The mechanism of these harmful effects likely is multifactorial. The nicotine in cigarettes causes vasoconstriction of cutaneous blood vessels with resultant decreased tissue oxygenation. Smoking also increases carboxyhemoglobin, increases platelet aggregation, increases blood viscosity, decreases collagen deposition, and decreases prostacyclin formation, which all negatively affect wound healing. In addition, vasoconstriction associated with smoking is not a transient phenomenon. Smoking a single cigarette may cause cutaneous vasoconstriction for up to 90 minutes; hence, a pack-a-day smoker remains tissue hypoxic for most of each day. Although no official guidelines have been established, many dermatologic surgeons consider it prudent to advise patients to quit smoking for a minimum of 1 week before and after surgical procedures, especially if cutaneous flaps or grafts are involved.

Wrinkles

No one has ever died of wrinkles, yet none of the cutaneous manifestations of smoking generate as much interest and attention as wrinkles. In many smokers, the threat of facial wrinkling is a greater motivator to quit than the threat of lung cancer or other life-threatening smoking-related diseases.

In 1965, Ippen and Ippen found that when compared to female nonsmokers, most female smokers had cigarette skin, which they defined as gray, pale, and wrinkled. In a large study, Daniell confirmed previous findings that smokers have premature and increased facial wrinkling compared to nonsmokers. The term smoker's face describes this phenomenon. Women may be more susceptible to the wrinkling effects of smoking, but the confounding variable of sun exposure may be partially responsible for this observation. Favre-Racouchot syndrome, a condition characterized by deep wrinkles and comedones formation, was found by Keough et al to be more common in smokers than in nonsmokers.

The exact mechanism by which smoking causes wrinkling is poorly understood. Elastin from non–sun-exposed skin in smokers is thicker and more fragmented than in nonsmokers. Chronic ischemia of the dermis from the vasoconstrictive effects of smoking likely is a factor in this. Decreased collagen synthesis from chronic ischemia also may be a factor. Prooxidant effects of smoking also may contribute to premature facial wrinkling. Since not all smokers have smoker's face, genetic factors also may be involved.

http://www.emedicine.com/derm/topic629.htm

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The Negative Effects of Smoking on Bones, Joints and Healing

Summarized by Paul Paryski, MA

August 3, 2001 (Reviewed: August 4, 2003)

Introduction

There are roughly 50 million smokers in the United States in spite of a great deal of publicity about the negative effects of smoking on health. These 50 million smokers consume an incredible 800 billion cigarettes annually. Cigarette smoking is also increasing rapidly in other parts of the world, particularly in the lesser-developed countries that can least afford either the cost of cigarettes or the cost of their negative effect on health.

There is growing and conclusive evidence that smoking is the leading avoidable cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States.

The effects of cigarette smoking on the musculoskeletal system (the bones, joints and muscles) have not been the subject of much publicity, nor have the public or doctors given it the same attention that they have to other diseases caused by smoking.

Two scientists have recently analyzed clinical studies of the effects of smoking on the musculoskeletal system. Their findings are summarized here.

Healing is affected by smoking, since an adequate degree of oxygenation is necessary to form mature collagen, which closes wounds. Smoking reduces the blood flow and the amount of available oxygen in the tissues under the skin. One study showed that even one cigarette could cause quite severe constriction of the blood vessels in the fingers.

It is obviously highly desirable for smokers to quit smoking before and after any surgery. No absolutely fixed rules were derived from the studies, the proposed duration of non-smoking varying from one day to three weeks before surgery to five days to four weeks after surgery. In any case, cessation of smoking before and after surgery definitively aids patient recovery. Although smokers tended to be less physically active and less concerned about their health, it's likely that the adverse effect of smoking was more direct than an action via either of these factors.

Results

Of 82 studies dating back to 1976 (with most of them carried out during the 1990's), 44 strongly suggested that smoking had a very serious negative impact on the musculoskeletal system. Other studies showed a weaker link, while 14 showed little or no proof of harm to the musculoskeletal system.

Two phases of negative effect occur while smoking. In an early volatile phase, almost 500 different gases are released into the lungs and the body, including nitrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, ammonia, hydrogen cyanide and benzene. In the particulate phase, or "tar phase", there is release of roughly 3,500 chemicals including nicotine, nomicotine, anatabine, anabase and large number of carcinogenic chemicals. Some of these chemicals, chiefly nicotine, lead to strong addiction.

In addition to filling the lungs and body with toxic chemicals, smoking decreases the amount of oxygen available for the brain and the body tissues, including those of the musculoskeletal system. Analysis of the studies showed that the related adverse effects are:

decreased bone density

lumbar disk problems

higher risk of sustaining hip and wrist fractures

a high risk of failure of bone fusion in fractures and grafts

low back pain

decreased wound healing ability

increase risk of postoperative infection

All these effects are particularly bad for older people. In addition, there is an increased risk of osteoporosis. One study pointed out that smoking decreased bone formation in osteoporotic patients. Another study showed that while a non-smoker can build 1 centimeter of bone in 2 months, it takes a smoker 3 months.

Conclusion

The results of this study are particularly important for older people, since they show that while cigarette smoking causes diseases such as cancer and cardiovascular problems, it also has very negative effects on the musculo- skeletal system and on wound healing. Certainly it shows that a smoker should consider stopping smoking before and after surgery. It should be remembered that annually over 500,000 deaths in the United States, and millions more throughout the world, are caused by smoking.

Source

The musculoskeletal effects of smoking. SE. Porter , EN. Hanley Jr , J Am Acad Orthop Surg , 2001, vol. 9, pp. 9--17

http://www.healthandage.com/Home/gm=7!gid2=1230

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Guest Tracy

Ok, Maya......I'm in. The quit date is November 13th. Plenty of time to prepare mentally to do this. I'm waaay overdue to quit smoking. I 'm inspired now to quit as well.

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That is so cool sista!!!! We're in this together now! biggrin.gifbiggrin.gifbiggrin.gif

And my b/f said he's going to quit b4 that date to make it easy for me too.

OK, got your address, I'll stick those patches in the post to you on Monday.

Mental and emotional preperation is key I think.

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Guest Tracy
That is so cool sista!!!! We're in this together now!  biggrin.gif  biggrin.gif  biggrin.gif 

And my b/f said he's going to quit b4 that date to make it easy for me too.

Mental and emotional preperation is key I think.

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Thought I'd throw my experience in here. A few yrs ago I had a derm use Versapulse on my depressed scars. Was supposed to nonablatively stimulate collagen like Smoothbeam, Cool Touch, etc. It backfired on me. I got major blisters & afterward my scars appeared somewhat worse.

The derm didn't understand what happened & just said he must've been too aggressive. That could have been the case, but later I saw a derm named Dr. McDaniel in Virginia Beach. He's supposed to be great w/Cool Touch, etc. & is on the cutting edge w/LED technology. He said my bad results could likely have been attributable to being a smoker at the time of the Versapulse tx. He said he had done a lot of the initial Cool Touch testing & that they found Cool Touch actually made things worse in some smokers.

Yet ANOTHER reason to quit!

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Hey Maya and the rest of you who are talking about quitting ciggerates then this message is for you. There is only two things in life I enjoyed and smoking my camels was one of them. You have to make up your mind that its time or else those patches and any other gimic to help you quit wont work. I dont know if they have this in your area but I quit with the help of these ciggerates called quest. Its 3 steps. The first step is .6 niccotene which is less then a light cigg of any brand. Step 2 is 0.3 niccotene which is super light. And step 3 and the final step is niccoteneless ciggs. Now even at the final step quitting will be very hard because the addiction is more then just niccotene. Its the whole habit thats addictive. I couldn't imagin life without my ciggs. I was more then a smoker, my ciggs where my friends. This may sound silly to you guys but this is how I did it ok. First off its much easier to finally quit off the last step of quests then my regular brand, with out the quest I would not have been able to quit, they help big time. The quest ciggs are no wheres near as enjoyable as your brand. I smoked the first step for about 3 days, then the second step for about 3 days, then the final step for about two weeks because I struggled to let go. I picked a weekend and said the sunday of this weekend is the last day I'm going to smoke. I smoked as many quests on that sunday as I could possably handle until I was sick just of the thought of them. Monday I got a bunch of packs of gum and its been about a month and I'm not going to go back to ciggerates again. This might sound silly to you guys but my point is I was a serious serious smoker and I was enjoying smoking more then ever before when I quit. If I can do it so can you guys, theres alot harder things we deal with then quitting, even though smoking makes are harder problems easier to deal with they are bad news if you are getting treatments. Maya you said it perfectly, not giving your self the best chance. If I live to be 70 I am going to go out and buy about 500 cartons of camels and smoke every last one for all the years I quit.

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