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Green_Vegetable_Man

The complete pocket guide to anti-inflammatory foods

with regards to the list, contents listed under worst does not necesarily mean bad right? just the most "non-effective" of aging and inflammatory right?

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with regards to the list, contents listed under worst does not necesarily mean bad right? just the most "non-effective" of aging and inflammatory right?

Some foods are bad for humans.

We humans started eating all edible products without careful selection.

That is why we ended up with cancers and incurable diseases.

For example monkeys are very very selective in food choices.

The study below of monkey food patterns gives a clue

Monkey diet is richer in vitamins and minerals than human diet, UC Berkeley anthropologist discovers

http://www.berkeley.edu/news/media/release.../5-18-1999.html

By Patricia McBroom, Public Affairs

BERKELEY--The fruits and leaves that monkeys eat in the wild are loaded with nutrients, giving these primates a diet far richer in many essential vitamins and minerals than the diet recommended for daily consumption by human beings.

This startling information has emerged from a study of monkey diets carried out at the University of California, Berkeley, by physical anthropologist Katharine Milton, an expert on primate diet.

She found, for instance, that the average 15-pound wild monkey takes in 600 milligrams per day of vitamin C, 10 times more than the 60-milligram recommended daily allowance, or RDA, for humans who weigh on average 150 pounds.

Differences on that order also were found for intakes of other micronutrients such as calcium, potassium and magnesium.

"The monkey diet is amazingly rich in nutrients," said Milton, a professor in the Department of Environmental Science, Policy & Management.

"I wouldn't have believed this before because I don't think of plants as being very nutritious. But then I noticed how much vitamin C was consumed by these monkeys," said Milton, who subsequently compared other nutrients in the wild foods with human RDAs.

"This information suggests that, for their size, many wild primates routinely ingest greater amounts of many minerals, vitamins, essential fatty acids, dietary fiber and other important dietary constituents than most modern human populations," Milton will report in the June issue of the journal "Nutrition: The International Journal of Basic and Applied Nutritional Sciences."

Milton's study took place on Barro Colorado Island, a six-square-mile Panamanian nature preserve covered by a dense tropical forest, much of which is old primary growth that has never been cut.

Four monkey species - howler, spider, cebus and tamarin - live on the island where the Smithsonian Institution maintains a research station. The animals eat wild foods believed to be characteristic of plants across the tropical belt, said Milton. The foods include leaves of many kinds and fruits such as figs, plums, berries, palmfruit and grapes.

Free-ranging primates in the tropical forests of Central and South America, Africa and Asia have been observed eating foods from many of the same plant families and even the same species as those on Barro Colorado Island, she added.

The anthropologist followed the monkeys through the forest with plastic bags, picking up the food they dropped or threw down from the trees.

"They would bite off the tips of leaves and throw the rest away," said Milton, who analyzed the leaves by sections and found the tips to be especially nutritious - a fact obviously known to the monkeys.

"Young leaves from tropical trees are far more nutritious than I realized. In fact, the young tips have the same profile of essential amino acids as meat, although in lower concentrations," said Milton. She said that leaf protein is perfectly good and clearly satisfies all the protein needs of the monkeys.

"I was very surprised," she said. "I always thought leafy material was deficient in some amino acids, but it is not."

Another surprise came when Milton analyzed the wild Panamanian fruits eaten by the monkeys and found them to be considerably more nutritious - with more protein, more of certain essential micronutrients and a different sugar content - than the cultivated varieties found in American supermarkets.

The sugars in the pulp of wild fruits occurred mainly as glucose and fructose (like honey), while the sugar in domesticated fruits is mainly sucrose (like plain table sugar), she found.

"Sucrose tastes sweeter than glucose, giving our cultivated fruits strong hedonistic appeal, but we have yet to find out whether there is a physiological cost to this high sucrose content," she said.

Milton also found that the wild fruits had higher levels of calcium, potassium, iron and phosphorus - sometimes as much as a 10-fold difference - compared to domesticated fruits.

"I'm not criticizing our fruits," said Milton. "They are pretty good, but we don't eat enough of them, and you have to remember that they have been bred for sweetness and appearance."

The monkey diets also had a better balance of essential fatty acids than do most American diets, which tend to be deficient in alpha linolenic acid, or ALA, said Milton. Foods high in ALA include soy and canola oil, uncooked cabbage, kale and Brussels sprouts.

Milton doesn't like to draw medical conclusions about humans from her new findings on monkey diets, saying that, "We are not monkeys, and we don't eat wild plants."

But she puzzles over the immense differences between the mineral intake, for instance, of a Panamanian monkey and that recommended for an adult man.

The monkey takes in 4,571 milligrams of calcium per day. The RDA for a human who weighs 10 times more is 800 milligrams. Of potassium, the monkey eats 6,419 milligrams; the human is expected to take in 1,600-2,000 milligrams. Of magnesium, the monkey eats 1,323 milligrams; the human RDA is 350 milligrams.

Unfortunately, many people don't even take in the mineral levels recommended as optimum for health, said Milton.

"Throughout history, humans have suffered from all sorts of diet-related diseases," said Milton. "If we paid more attention to what our wild, primate relatives are eating today, perhaps we could learn new things about our own dietary needs that would help reduce health problems throughout the world."

Milton cautioned, however, that people should not rush into the forest and begin eating leaves and wild fruit because human physiology - particularly the gut - has changed through evolution.

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It doesn't break down that simple though. For example, calling chicken liver one of the worst foods? No way, organ meats are best, and chicken liver is one of the healthiest animal origin foods you could eat. I'm starting to drift back to Weston A. Price's teachings again - eat the healthy, fatty organ meats of animals along with eggs (fish and chicken), raw milk, and plenty of green vegetables, fermented foods, etc. and you'll live long and healthy. I know of a local dairy farmer who's over 80 and drinks raw milk daily, a quart I believe. By the way, calling coconut oil bad? What the hell...Yet Canola oil is good? Getthefuckouttahere...

Breakfast cereals should all be considered "worst", they're a classic case of highly processed foods. As a child I was addicted to them. Whoever made that list seems to be very ignorant of the history of their field as well as a victim of the dogma that all saturated fats are bad.

One last rant - corn chips worse then saltines? Wait a sec, aren't saltines white flour while corn chips are "whole" grain? What the hell...

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It doesn't break down that simple though. For example, calling chicken liver one of the worst foods? No way, organ meats are best, and chicken liver is one of the healthiest animal origin foods you could eat. I'm starting to drift back to Weston A. Price's teachings again - eat the healthy, fatty organ meats of animals along with eggs (fish and chicken), raw milk, and plenty of green vegetables, fermented foods, etc. and you'll live long and healthy. I know of a local dairy farmer who's over 80 and drinks raw milk daily, a quart I believe. By the way, calling coconut oil bad? What the hell...Yet Canola oil is good? Getthefuckouttahere...

Breakfast cereals should all be considered "worst", they're a classic case of highly processed foods. As a child I was addicted to them. Whoever made that list seems to be very ignorant of the history of their field as well as a victim of the dogma that all saturated fats are bad.

One last rant - corn chips worse then saltines? Wait a sec, aren't saltines white flour while corn chips are "whole" grain? What the hell...

RS. It's becoming clear that you, I, and a few others (Shmelis, Danny, etc) are the only non-mods who hang out here regularly that know WTF we are talking about. Everyone else is so mis-informed it's scary. I won't name them but there are a couple poeple that keep posting threads and giving false advice on an almost daily basis, and I find that you and I are often spending our time correcting them making that whole "New Stickie" thing all the more appealing.

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While I don't agree with everything here, I would say that this is a positive step in posting. Now find more scientifically backed sources on the same subject and post again. Don't jump from issue to issue, just stay focised on one and research the hell out of it. That's why people like Sweetjade has gone head and shoulders above everyone here now in terms of knowing what the hell she is talking about in her acne situation. Se not only knows what causes her to break out but why right down to the most basic level and then uses proven research to come up with a solution that doesn't involve copious amoutns of drugs. I have problems with paragraphs.

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While I don't agree with everything here, I would say that this is a positive step in posting. Now find more scientifically backed sources on the same subject and post again. Don't jump from issue to issue, just stay focised on one and research the hell out of it. That's why people like Sweetjade has gone head and shoulders above everyone here now in terms of knowing what the hell she is talking about in her acne situation. Se not only knows what causes her to break out but why right down to the most basic level and then uses proven research to come up with a solution that doesn't involve copious amoutns of drugs. I have problems with paragraphs.

:dance::clap::):sick::shock::think::whistle::wub:

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It doesn't break down that simple though. For example, calling chicken liver one of the worst foods? No way, organ meats are best, and chicken liver is one of the healthiest animal origin foods you could eat. I'm starting to drift back to Weston A. Price's teachings again - eat the healthy, fatty organ meats of animals along with eggs (fish and chicken), raw milk, and plenty of green vegetables, fermented foods, etc. and you'll live long and healthy. I know of a local dairy farmer who's over 80 and drinks raw milk daily, a quart I believe. By the way, calling coconut oil bad? What the hell...Yet Canola oil is good? Getthefuckouttahere...

It seems to me that what is considered to be a good or bad food depends on whatever particular diet you are following, so, whilst chicken liver may have it nutritional benefits, it is quite possible it is also an 'inflammatory' food. I'd quite like to better understand on what basis this book judges foods as being inflammatory and if such foods are necessarily bad because of that effect.

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It's actually really easy to figure out their simple formula for what they base as inflammatory vs. anti inflammatory. They use the glycemic load and index of food as well as fat content (excess omega 6 is inflammatory, all saturated fats are considered inflammatory whether that's true or not, and omega 3's are anti inflammatory). That's basically it. That's what makes banannas and mangos theoretical "bad foods", and what makes some cereals be regarded as anti inflammatory even though they're relatively nutrient-devoid and just mid GI.

Chicken liver was probably considered inflammatory on the basis that it has a lot of fat, yet it's the fatty part that gives the animal-based vitamin A (and D?), something that's pretty lacking from our diets for the most part unless you eat a lot of eggs, because of our choice to eat muscle meats and cut away all the fat.

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It's actually really easy to figure out their simple formula for what they base as inflammatory vs. anti inflammatory. They use the glycemic load and index of food as well as fat content (excess omega 6 is inflammatory, all saturated fats are considered inflammatory whether that's true or not, and omega 3's are anti inflammatory). That's basically it. That's what makes banannas and mangos theoretical "bad foods", and what makes some cereals be regarded as anti inflammatory even though they're relatively nutrient-devoid and just mid GI.

Chicken liver was probably considered inflammatory on the basis that it has a lot of fat, yet it's the fatty part that gives the animal-based vitamin A (and D?), something that's pretty lacking from our diets for the most part unless you eat a lot of eggs, because of our choice to eat muscle meats and cut away all the fat.

The list is a scientific analysis and I accept it.

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Hey RS, You were talking about breakfast cereals being bad for you.. what if its an organic one? and gluten free too?

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It's actually really easy to figure out their simple formula for what they base as inflammatory vs. anti inflammatory. They use the glycemic load and index of food as well as fat content (excess omega 6 is inflammatory, all saturated fats are considered inflammatory whether that's true or not, and omega 3's are anti inflammatory). That's basically it. That's what makes banannas and mangos theoretical "bad foods", and what makes some cereals be regarded as anti inflammatory even though they're relatively nutrient-devoid and just mid GI.

Chicken liver was probably considered inflammatory on the basis that it has a lot of fat, yet it's the fatty part that gives the animal-based vitamin A (and D?), something that's pretty lacking from our diets for the most part unless you eat a lot of eggs, because of our choice to eat muscle meats and cut away all the fat.

The list is a scientific analysis and I accept it.

You're just as good as the "patriot" that accepts everything George Bush says without question then.

Hey RS, You were talking about breakfast cereals being bad for you.. what if its an organic one? and gluten free too?

The inherent problem with most breakfast cereals is that they're one of the most processed foods you can get - they're overcooked and subjected to way too high of temperatures, they're refined grains, and even if not, they're still grain based which is a relatively nutritionally devoid food and mainly of value for athletes who need the carbs... Here's an article:

Packaged Cereals

Dry breakfast cereals are produced by a process called extrusion. Cereal makers first create a slurry of the grains and then put them in a machine called an extruder. The grains are forced out of a little hole at high temperature and pressure. Depending on the shape of the hole, the grains are made into little o's, flakes, animal shapes, or shreds (as in Shredded Wheat or Triscuits), or they are puffed (as in puffed rice). A blade slices off each little flake or shape, which is then carried past a nozzle and sprayed with a coating of oil and sugar to seal off the cereal from the ravages of milk and to give it crunch.

In his book Fighting the Food Giants, Paul Stitt has tells us that the extrusion process used for these cereals destroys most of the nutrients in the grains. It destroys the fatty acids; it even destroys the chemical vitamins that are added at the end. The amino acids are rendered very toxic by this process. The amino acid lysine, a crucial nutrient, is especially denatured by extrusion. This is how all the boxed cereals are made, even the ones sold in the health food stores. They are all made in the same way and mostly in the same factories. All dry cereals that come in boxes are extruded cereals.

The only advances made in the extrusion process are those that will cut cost regardless of how these will alter the nutrient content of the product. Cereals are a multi-billion dollar business, one that has created huge fortunes.

http://www.westonaprice.org/modernfood/dirty-secrets.html

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