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Shake Off the Dust  Arise

To all the coconut oil fanatics !!

http://www.google.com/

Don't get too crazy with eating coconut oil like the people who eat straight spoonfuls unless you're trying to kill off candida. Other then that, it's a very healthy oil, the best one for resisting oxidation, and should be used as your sole oil in frying and baking (seseame oil is also okay for frying because of it's unique antioxidants, and olive oil is okay for low heat sauteeing but don't use it for high heat frying). The MCFA's in coconut oil are a good energy source, easy to digest, and very beneficial. Kind of blows away the whole mainstream "all saturated fats are bad" dogma.

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satured fats arent the baddies, polyunsatured fats kill.

i eat like 2 tblsp of coconut oil a day, in my tea, love it :D

havent tried it topically

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Really it's just the oxidized polyunsaturates (bad bad bad!), and excess omega-6's... add flax and fish to the diet and your all cool. Too bad flax is my worst enemy.

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I used coconut oil on my face and I got milia all over from it. I do eat it though. I use it as a butter spread on breads. It tastes REALLY REALLY good as a spread!!! As a facial moisturizer, however, it was NOT good for my skin.

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Guest ThereIsHope
Too bad flax is my worst enemy

Hey rubbersheep, why is flaxseed your worst enemy??

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Too bad flax is my worst enemy

Hey rubbersheep, why is flaxseed your worst enemy??

Breakouts, I suspect. I'm the same way. Can't eat flaxseed at all.

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I used coconut oil on my face and I got milia all over from it. I do eat it though. I use it as a butter spread on breads. It tastes REALLY REALLY good as a spread!!! As a facial moisturizer, however, it was NOT good for my skin.

Stay away from coconut oil

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I used coconut oil on my face and I got milia all over from it. I do eat it though. I use it as a butter spread on breads. It tastes REALLY REALLY good as a spread!!! As a facial moisturizer, however, it was NOT good for my skin.

Stay away from coconut oil

What are you talking about cocomut oil is awesome as a food and as a cooking oil.

Yer just talking gibberish

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Coconut oil is my sole cooking oil. I even use it on raw vegetables (such as carrots) to give it a better flavor. :)

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Coconut oil is my sole cooking oil. I even use it on raw vegetables (such as carrots) to give it a better flavor. :)

Awesome. Me too. I could eat the stuff by the jarfull

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Too bad flax is my worst enemy

Hey rubbersheep, why is flaxseed your worst enemy??

allergy :(

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I used coconut oil on my face and I got milia all over from it. I do eat it though. I use it as a butter spread on breads. It tastes REALLY REALLY good as a spread!!! As a facial moisturizer, however, it was NOT good for my skin.

Stay away from coconut oil

What are you talking about cocomut oil is awesome as a food and as a cooking oil.

Yer just talking gibberish

The Food and Drug Administration has informed consumers to avoid coconut oil, a saturated fat. (The American Medical Association agrees that saturated fats should be limited in our diets.) Evidence in favor of coconut oil has not yet met the FDA’s standards for recommendation; studies are regarded as either inadequately controlled or not extensive enough to be conclusive.

When coconut oil is hydrogenated it becomes a trans fat, and trans fats are bad news. Trans fats have been closely associated with heart disease because they not only increase LDL cholesterol but impede the body’s ability to utilize HDL.

Unless you are cooking with virgin coconut oil, the only coconut oil in your diet may be hydrogenated.

More strongly, the Department of Health and Human Services sends warning letters to Web sites that market coconut-oil products based on therapeutic claims.

The assertion that coconut oil can cure hypothyroidism appears to be untrue.

The idea that coconut oil could cure an underactive thyroid was promoted in a 2003 article in Woman’s World magazine as well as other materials on coconut oil; however, the sources for these pieces have been questioned. According to experts at Mayo Clinic, “there is no evidence that coconut oil stimulates thyroid function. In fact, some research suggests that coconut oil may have a negative impact on the thyroid.�

Coconut oil is challenged on two fronts. First is the erroneous belief that all dietary fat becomes body fat—not all “fat in� equals “fat on.� Second is that it’s a saturated fat like the fat in beef, cheese, eggs and butter. “Saturated fatty acids tend to raise levels of LDL cholesterol (‘bad’ cholesterol) in the blood. Elevated levels of LDL cholesterol are associated with heart disease,� an FDA spokesman reminds us.

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Get out of here with that nonsense, MB. First of all we're not talking about hydrogenated. Second of all, go research MCFA's, lauric acid, capric acid, caprylic acid / other highly beneficial fatty acids in coconut oil. THE SATURATED FAT IN COCONUT OIL IS DIFFERENT THEN WHAT IS IN BEEF, EGGS AND MILK!

Now here's the real kicker: "experts" say you should be cooking with polyunsaturated fats like canola, safflower and soybean oil. Yet these same oils are almost always oxidized, rancid, and FULL of free radicals. This is one of the biggest stresses on your body, consuming these bad, rancid oils. Even if they're cold pressed, the chemical processing that goes into things like canola oil is an absolute joke compared to making expeller pressed coconut or olive oil. How can you even call things like canola oil a "food" after all the processing they go through? Yet all the mainstream experts are all over the oil industry with that little recommendation. The beauty of saturated fats and coconut oil (and monounsaturated, high oleic oils like olive oil to a lesser regard) is that they are much less subject to the oxidation that plagues fragile polyunsaturated fatty acids. Haven't you ever heard it's bad to heat up flax seed oil / cod liver oil? Then why is it okay to do heavy frying in soybean oil? Hmm...

Anyways even if coconut oil wasn't healthier then every other oil out there for general cookery, all frying, and baking as well, it sure has a lot of culinary value in that it adds a nice flavor, great, butter texture, and helps hold together baked goods exceptionally well.

Another danger of using oils that the FDA would have you believe are good like canola oil is that they'll really fuck with your omega 3:6 ratio.

The only oils you really need in your kitchen are olive oil and coconut oil. Seseame oil is a notable one too, because it's had a long traditional use and unique antioxidants to protect it from heat. If you want to get funky and change up the flavor of your salad dressing with cold pressed MacNut oil or hemp oil, that's fine too but don't go overboard.

The FDA obviously doesn't do their research, or atleast doesn't place it as high of a priority as satisfying Corporate America (pretty easy to see that He Who Has Money Controls What You Think).

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Thank you for that rubbersheep, you know MB was just trying to bring things into the conversation that weren't even mentioned so try to shift focus to whatever he types. Judging from countless posts he's made it looks like he is just attention starved.

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We really need to make a sticky about good fats vs. bad... it took me months of research to find out this stuff, before that I was just confused as hell and figured even the "experts" didn't know what they were talking about and couldn't agree when really fats and oils make a pretty clear cut picture as far as diet goes... besides the whole "saturated fats good or bad" thing which some people get into but I just say go in moderation and it's fine...

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We really need to make a sticky about good fats vs. bad... it took me months of research to find out this stuff, before that I was just confused as hell and figured even the "experts" didn't know what they were talking about and couldn't agree when really fats and oils make a pretty clear cut picture as far as diet goes... besides the whole "saturated fats good or bad" thing which some people get into but I just say go in moderation and it's fine...

Yes a stick listing difference between oils and fats, kinds of fats, good and bad ones, how much of what is needed in diet, and good food sources.

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Get out of here with that nonsense, MB. First of all we're not talking about hydrogenated. Second of all, go research MCFA's, lauric acid, capric acid, caprylic acid / other highly beneficial fatty acids in coconut oil. THE SATURATED FAT IN COCONUT OIL IS DIFFERENT THEN WHAT IS IN BEEF, EGGS AND MILK!

Now here's the real kicker: "experts" say you should be cooking with polyunsaturated fats like canola, safflower and soybean oil. Yet these same oils are almost always oxidized, rancid, and FULL of free radicals. This is one of the biggest stresses on your body, consuming these bad, rancid oils. Even if they're cold pressed, the chemical processing that goes into things like canola oil is an absolute joke compared to making expeller pressed coconut or olive oil. How can you even call things like canola oil a "food" after all the processing they go through? Yet all the mainstream experts are all over the oil industry with that little recommendation. The beauty of saturated fats and coconut oil (and monounsaturated, high oleic oils like olive oil to a lesser regard) is that they are much less subject to the oxidation that plagues fragile polyunsaturated fatty acids. Haven't you ever heard it's bad to heat up flax seed oil / cod liver oil? Then why is it okay to do heavy frying in soybean oil? Hmm...

Anyways even if coconut oil wasn't healthier then every other oil out there for general cookery, all frying, and baking as well, it sure has a lot of culinary value in that it adds a nice flavor, great, butter texture, and helps hold together baked goods exceptionally well.

Another danger of using oils that the FDA would have you believe are good like canola oil is that they'll really fuck with your omega 3:6 ratio.

The only oils you really need in your kitchen are olive oil and coconut oil. Seseame oil is a notable one too, because it's had a long traditional use and unique antioxidants to protect it from heat. If you want to get funky and change up the flavor of your salad dressing with cold pressed MacNut oil or hemp oil, that's fine too but don't go overboard.

The FDA obviously doesn't do their research, or atleast doesn't place it as high of a priority as satisfying Corporate America (pretty easy to see that He Who Has Money Controls What You Think).

I disagree.

Prove your statements against the FDA and myself.

You claim coconut oil is good.

Coconut oil also becomes rancid and creates problems.

The Miraculous Coconut Oil

There are many people who happily promote coconut oil as a healthy addition to the diet, and an aid to weight loss. This is in extreme opposition to the current thinking that saturated fat is bad. 100 grams of coconut oil contains 86 grams of saturated fat (source).

Dr Fuhrman (in the comments of this post) explains in some detail - the nutritional profile of the oil. He goes onto outline why he believes coconut is completely over-hyped. All the technical details are beyond me - but one statement stands out "We should be eating food, (as nature intended) not oil (isolated fat)."

http://www.diet-blog.com/archives/2006/03/...tors_debate.php

Written By:Joel Fuhrman

On March 21, 2006 08:30 PM

"I just went to www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/Data/ our governments web analysis tool and analyzed plain coconut oil for you guys and added up the numbers including the fractions so it would be exact. 100 grams of coconut oil contains 86.5 percent (grams) of saturated fat. It contains 14.1 (percent) grams of 6-10 chain (medium chain) saturated fats and 5.8 grams of monounsaturated fat. So it is most accurate to call it about 14 percent or those less harmfull MCT saturated fats (a relatively small amount) that these greasy coconut oil sales people hype up as the magic wonder part. Of course don't forget, even though I have said this hundreds of times here already--> the extracted oil contain less than one tenth of nature's valuable nutrients than the same amount of calories obtained from the whole food (coconut). When you eat more of the whole food and less oil, you increase the nutrient density of your diet. When you substitute oil for the nut, you dilute the nutrient density of your diet. I mix whole raw nuts into dressing recipes where others might use oil and the taste is even better and you gain nutritional benefits in the process. "

http://www.diseaseproof.com/archives/healt...lent-foods.html

10% of coconut oil is actually 0mega-6

IF (Inflammation Factor) Ratingâ„¢ for Vegetable oil, coconut = -1798

strongly inflammatory

This food contains known inflammatory nutrients, including Saturated Fat, and has a relatively high ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fats.

The IF Ratingâ„¢ provides an estimation of this food's effect on inflammation.

http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts-B00001-01c208C.html

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MB what you just posted doesn't prove coconut oil is bad for you. Also you didn't disagree with rubbersheep either.

Rubbersheep said that coconut oil and olive oil are really all you need to cook with, which is true.

All you really said in your post is that coconut oil goes rancid and that's it's less nutrient dense than the source it's extracted from.

So what. All food spoils. That's why we have storage methods. Also your whole argument (or lackthereof) seems to based on the speculation that saturated fat is bad for you, which it is not, even in it's isolated form.

The point is you did not rebut rubbersheep and the information you provided does not get us closer to concrete answers.

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MB what you just posted doesn't prove coconut oil is bad for you. Also you didn't disagree with rubbersheep either.

Rubbersheep said that coconut oil and olive oil are really all you need to cook with, which is true.

All you really said in your post is that coconut oil goes rancid and that's it's less nutrient dense than the source it's extracted from.

So what. All food spoils. That's why we have storage methods. Also your whole argument (or lackthereof) seems to based on the speculation that saturated fat is bad for you, which it is not, even in it's isolated form.

The point is you did not rebut rubbersheep and the information you provided does not get us closer to concrete answers.

A study at the Heart Research Institute in Sydney, Australia used coconut oil and safflower oil (a polyunsaturated fat) in two otherwise identical meals. The study found that:

“...three hours after eating [the coconut oil meal], the lining of the arteries was hindered from expanding to increase blood flow. And after six hours, the anti-inflammatory qualities of the good cholesterol were reduced.

“But [the safflower oil meal] seemed to improve those anti-inflammatory qualities. Also, fewer inflammatory agents were found in the arteries than before the meal.�[5].

Although the above study involved only 14 subjects and does not detail how the oils used were processed, it supports the view that coconut oil's saturated fatty acids make it less healthy to consume than polyunsaturated oils, such as safflower.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coconut_oil

Health effects

The American Heart Association, advises that coconut oil's high saturated fat content is detrimental to cardiovascular health and promotes heart disease. By way of contrast Enig[3] states, "Hostmark et al (1980) compared the effects of diets containing 10% coconut fat and 10% sunflower oil on lipoprotein distribution in male Wistar rats. Coconut oil feeding produced significantly lower levels (p=<0.05) of pre-beta lipoproteins (VLDL) and significantly higher (p=<0.01) alpha-lipoproteins (HDL) relative to sunflower oil feeding."[4]

For many years now, the primary serum cholesterol-elevating fatty acids have been demonstrated to be the saturated fatty acids with 12(Lauric), 14(Myristic) and 16(Palmitic) carbon atoms, with a concomitant increase in the risk of coronary heart disease. Monounsaturated fatty acids such as oleic acid are as effective in reducing serum total and low-density lipoprotein(LDL) cholesterol levels as polyunsaturated fatty acids such as linoleic. {Vessby,B.1994. INFORM 5(2):182-185.}

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coconut_oil

Coconut oil is a triglyceride containing 86.5% saturated fatty acids, 5.8% monounsaturated fatty acids, and 1.8% polyunsaturated fatty acids. Of its saturated fatty acids, coconut oil is primarily 44.6% lauric acid, 16.8% myristic acid and 8.2% palmitic acid, though it contains seven different saturated fatty acids in total. Its only monounsaturated fatty acid is oleic acid while its only polyunsaturated fatty acid is linoleic acid.[1]

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We really need to make a sticky about good fats vs. bad... it took me months of research to find out this stuff, before that I was just confused as hell and figured even the "experts" didn't know what they were talking about and couldn't agree when really fats and oils make a pretty clear cut picture as far as diet goes... besides the whole "saturated fats good or bad" thing which some people get into but I just say go in moderation and it's fine...

I agree with you 100%. For god's sake, folks, this ridiculous "saturated versus unsaturated" issue is one that should have disappeared ages ago. My own personal motto is this: "The only BAD fat is an OXIDIZED fat."â„¢ Just go about your business and follow the general rules of good nutrition, which includes eating a variety of good, fresh foods. No need to carry a calculator with you as you tally-up all the quantities of saturated, mono-unsaturated, and polyunsaturated fats that you eat! :lol:

Bryan

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CLEVELAND - Eating just one meal high in saturated fat - can quickly prevent "good" cholesterol from protecting the body against clogged arteries, a small study shows.

http://www.komotv.com/healthwatch/story.asp?ID=44804

That also reminds me of a study which Pearson & Shaw once referenced a few years ago. I don't remember all the details now, but it was similar to the one you cited above, in that high-fat meals were given to test subjects, and SOMETHING having to do with heart disease or stroke (it might have been platelet aggregation, or something else along those lines) was measured for a few hours afterwards. And just as you would expect, the harmful effect was exacerbated by the high-fat content of the meal. BUT (and here's the real kicker! :D ), the effect was ABOLISHED when a hefty dose of vitamin C (and possibly one other nutrient...I wish I could remember all the details of the study) was given along with the high-fat meal!

People should stop wringing their hands so much over just one particular issue (the overall levels of macronutrients like saturated fat) in their diets, and start being more concerned with the overall quality of the food they eat, like the general levels of vitamins and minerals, the quality of the protein, the stability of the fat (whether or not the fat is oxidized, in other words), etc. The famous biochemist Dr. Roger Williams once said that if you have sufficient levels of pyridoxine (vitamin B6) in your diet, "fat metabolism tends to take care of itself."

Bryan

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Why would anyone hydrogenate coconut oil? :wacko:

does anyone know whats the best source for mono-saturated fats?, i usually eat some nuts but how do you know whether a nut is oxidised or not? what's the chance of that happening? are there better safer sources? I agree with the no-bad fats just oxidised/trans btw.

CLEVELAND - Eating just one meal high in saturated fat - can quickly prevent "good" cholesterol from protecting the body against clogged arteries, a small study shows.

http://www.komotv.com/healthwatch/story.asp?ID=44804

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