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peridottie

mineral foundation with mica?

i avoid bare minerals because of the bismuth oxide... but i didn't realize mica was supposed to be bad for acne-prone skin. i've seen it in sunscreens and stuff, and now i'm worried. does it contribute to acne?

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Use Physician's FOrmula Talc-Free Mineral Wear, which you can purchase from Walgreens. It is specially formulated for acne-prone skin. I've been wearing since July and it doesn't break me out! I'm so glad. I used to use SheerCover minerals, but that broke me out.

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hmm... i think mica breaks us out.... or so i'm told. if i'm wrong, someone please correct me.

Physician's FOrmula? hmm... i might give that a try but i don't have a walgreens around me. is it available in cvs? or any drugstore?

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I've used Mineral Secret's and they do not use Mica. I personally did not notice a difference other than the fact that the makeup was terrible. When I researched Mica I found that the risk for irratation was very minimal. Mica is in almost all cosmetics and I would be more concerned with other ingredients before Mica. Just do a search on it and see what you find out.

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this is what i found after googling mica

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Mica in cosmetics

Recently I have been hooked on “Make-Your-Own� cosmetics, and I use mica when I make these cosmetics. There are so many different colors in micas, and I want to know how does each mica get its particular color and whether they are natural color or synthetic pigments?

Mireiyu (Mar 2004)

Answer:

Mr. I.T., who is an expert in mica, kindly answered the question above.

I assume that you are asking about mica-based pearl pigment used in cosmetics. The pigments that have the luster of natural pearls are generally called pearl pigments. People have been using pearl pigment since the 16th century. At that time, they used the scales of swordfish for the pigments.

Although mica is often thought to have its own particular color, the different colors of micas are produced by the optical reflection of their multiple layers. The theory behind the colors of mica is same as that of rainbows or soap bubbles (neither the rainbows nor soap bubbles have their own color). We see the different colors through the light interference of the mica base and the thin film of titanium dioxide coating the base. We can create different colors by changing the thickness of the titanium dioxide film.

Acknowledgement

We would like to thank Mr. I.T for his kind answer.

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