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Jen121

What is insulin resistant?

Can someone explain to me, what this means?

Also I have heard of the term "skin diabetes" is that the same thing? My mom has type 2 diabetes, would that have anything to do with my acne... although she is overweight and i am thin.

One more random question: I know that cooking destroys nutrients and minerals... so lets say i cooked fish for dinner, and put the left overs in the fridge. The next day for lunch i eat it... is it better to eat it cold rather than warm it in the microwave? I have been wondering about that.... :think:

thanks :D

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Insulin resistance means that your body is not sensitive to insulin

Insulin is needed to transport glucose within the cells

Once in the cell membrana the receptors glut-4 open the cell-doors to let glucose in

Insuline resistance in simple words is caused by the body lacking the keys to these doors

The insulin receptors when there's insulin resistance are hugely decreased

The glucose can't enter in the cell and so it remains in the blood while it raises the blood sugar levels

The pancreas produces more insulin trying to make up for the loss of keys

If this approach is succesful than too much circulating glucose enters the cells leaving very little blood sugar and causing hypoglycemia (so hypoglycemia is caused by excess of sugar in the blood and not lack of sugar that's just the symptom of consequence)

But often this approach is not succesful either because the insulin resistant body produces already huge amount of insulin and is not insulin-dependent (which is caused by the death of beta-cells hence a decreased production of insulin)

In insulin resistance the insulin is there but it's ineffective and the reason is the decreased amount of glut-4

Some speculates that it's metabolic fat that causes a reduction of insulin-receptors by increasing blood viscosity

This is not a matter of dietary-fat but of body fat and not even subcutaneous fat but abdominal fat

That's the kind of fat which would metabolically disturb the insulin-receptors task

Insulin resistance is often accompained by other symptoms of metabolic disturbance like high abdominal fat levels, high tryglicerides levels, low high density lipo-proteins and high low density lipoproteins levels, high blood sugar levels and hypertension and together they're called syndrome-X

Insulin resistance is reversible and many dietary approaches and specific foods are known to increase the insulin-receptors on the cell membrana surface making the body more sensitive to insulin

But it is thought that Insulin Resistance could lead to insulin-dependant diabetes because the body trying to make up for the loss of insulin efficiency overproduces insulin daily and with time weakens the pancreas which becomes unable to produce enough insulin

Insulin resistance responds very well to consistent and moderate physical exercise

It is thought that insulin resistance and hence the decrease in insulin-receptors is a survival-pathway the body uses not to become too fat ... a survival-pathway that obese people would lack

It makes sense as the decrease in receptors would force the body not to feed its cells (in excess) so if there's an excess of glucose going to the small cells the doors of the cells are closed so nothing can enter ... it's a kind of sold out tickets at the cinema

This is consistent with the fact that insulins resistance responds very well to light-eating, fasting, vegetable broths ... in other words to stopped-feeding when the body is telling in all the possible ways "stop eating! please .. I don't need that!"

One more random question: I know that cooking destroys nutrients and minerals ...

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In fewer words, Jen, insulin resistance is when you make your body produce a lot of insulin over a period of time (such as eating very large meals with lots of carbs that your body needs to make a lot of insulin to respond to) and after a while the cells in your pancreas that make it get tired and can't produce enough or produces a bad kind of it, or stops producing it completely. If the first or second happen, it's called Type 2 Diabetes. Type 2 Diabetes tends to run in families. If the third happens, it's called Type 1 Diabetes, which can either evolve from Type 2 (like my dad) or can develop at a younger age, and doesn't require you to have built up an "insulin resistance" first.

In simpler terms,

Insulin Resistance--> Damaged Pancreas --> Less Insulin or Improperly Metabolized Insulin--> Higher Blood Glucose Levels --> Obesity, Type 2 Diabetes (Acne? Though I think if a link exists this is a secondary consequence related to the balance between insulin and other metabolic hormones, not a direct consequence of high blood glucose levels)

Eventually these lead to other damage associated with these diseases (such as glaucoma, cardiovascular problems, high blood pressure, renal failure, diabetic ketoacidosis, and even death... though the death comes from a secondary problem, not diabetes or obesity itself).

Again, this is horribly oversimplified... but this is the easiest way to explain it.

Edit: About microwaves: Microwaves are very low-frequency radiation... actually a household microwave works by producing radiation at exactly the frequency to excite water molecules... That's why if you've noticed that when you leave a food in the microwave uncovered, steam is produced and the food tends to be a little drier. This frequency is not harmful to humans, and doesn't really alter the chemical properties of food very much (though I'll admit to the possibility of structural changes... But the site Danny provided isn't something I would consider an unbiased or entirely accurate source... I'd prefer to trust an explanation that relies on real physics and chemistry... not something that talks about "destroying the life force" in food)... but if you can put your leftovers in the oven to warm them, that's definitely better.

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Insulin resistance isn't when your body overproduces insulin, that's just a consequence

Insulin resistance is the body ignoring the function of insulin by not allowing insulin to transport glucose into the cells. That's why in insulin resistance at the beginning abnormalities of the pancreas or the beta-cells are not observed but it's the insulin-receptors in the cell surface that are affected

The oversemplification that eating a certain ratio of carbs increase so much insulin (and beef causes higher levels of insulin than white rice) production so that after time the pancreas can't produce anymore ... it's what the zealot low carb gurus have been naively promoting but the real process starts with the insulin-proofedcells which has nothing to do with insulin, the beta-cells or the pancreas itself but with the cells alone

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Right, what Danny said....

Furthermore, Glut-4 can be damaged or supressed by inflammation.

There's a huge assortment of inflammatory products associated with Insulin Resistance, Diabetes, and ...Acne, but one of which that is to blame for damaging Glut-4 is TNF-a (tumor necrosis factor alpha).

TNF-a is present when you have too much IGF-1 (insulin-like growth factor-1) for those concerned with acne (or cancer), and is produced by Abdominal Fat and as an immune response in hypersensitivity reactions (why we also avoid foods that have nothing to do with insulin spikes)

Thus, why Insulin Resistance, Diabetes, PCOS and basically the Metabolic Syndrome is more recently being considerd a Silent Chronic Inflammatory Disease!

Inflammation and obesity...

Abstract.

Obesity and excess weight resulting from inflammation is a radical departure from orthodox thinking that is dominated by the energy imbalance theory. The muscle cell is responsible for converting food, in the form of glucose and fat, into energy. Muscle cell efficiency can be diminished by inflammation resulting in a loss of efficiency. Glut4 is required to facilitate transport of glucose through the muscle cell membrane, if it cannot enter the cell, it will be stored in the adipocytes. Lipolysis is dependent upon LPL, for delivery of fat to the adipocytes, the delivery of free fatty acids to the muscle cells and the conversion of serum triacylglycerols into free fatty acids. Oxygen is required to allow the cell to operate aerobically; while the cell can operate anaerobically this reduces energy output significantly.

Glut4, LPL and oxygen are all adversely affected by inflammation, contributing to insulin resistance, in particular by TNF alpha, which is released by a number of activated immune cells and by the adipocytes. TNF alpha inhibits IRS-1, the insulin receptor, while TNF alpha and IL-6, working by different pathways, suppress the availability of Glut4, required to deliver glucose; similarly TNF alpha and IL-6 suppress the production of LPL interrupting fat metabolism. ROS, generated by activated by PMN, decrease the oxygen carrying capacity of the erythrocytes and prevent the erythrocytes from entering the capillaries a function required to deliver oxygen to the muscle cells and for the clearance of Co2.

The obese are at a considerable biochemical disadvantage when compared to the normal weighted individuals http://www.epc-odx.com/obesity/

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There's a huge assortment of inflammatory products associated with Insulin Resistance, Diabetes, and ...Acne, but one of which that is to blame for damaging Glut-4 is TNF-a (tumor necrosis factor alpha).

TNF-a is present when you have too much IGF-1 (insulin-like growth factor-1) for those concerned with acne (or cancer), and is produce by Abdominal Fat and as an immune response in hypersensitivity reactions (why we also avoid foods that have nothing to do with insulin spikes)

I didn't know that

Thanks for this informative post !

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Insulin resistance isn't when your body overproduces insulin, that's just a consequence

Insulin resistance is the body ignoring the function of insulin by not allowing insulin to transport glucose into the cells. That's why in insulin resistance at the beginning abnormalities of the pancreas or the beta-cells are not observed but it's the insulin-receptors in the cell surface that are affected

The oversemplification that eating a certain ratio of carbs increase so much insulin (and beef causes higher levels of insulin than white rice) production so that after time the pancreas can't produce anymore ... it's what the zealot low carb gurus have been naively promoting but the real process starts with the insulin-proofedcells which has nothing to do with insulin, the beta-cells or the pancreas itself but with the cells alone

Sorry, yo. I was trying to oversimplify it because your post was unreadable.

I could rattle off everything I know about this (which is a lot, I happen to live with a Diabetic and work at a company that deals exclusively with diabetes and obesity... I'm definitely not a low-carb guru), but that would be pointless... It would be just as jargon-y and unreadable as the rest of this.

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There's a huge assortment of inflammatory products associated with Insulin Resistance, Diabetes, and ...Acne, but one of which that is to blame for damaging Glut-4 is TNF-a (tumor necrosis factor alpha).

TNF-a is present when you have too much IGF-1 (insulin-like growth factor-1) for those concerned with acne (or cancer), and is produce by Abdominal Fat and as an immune response in hypersensitivity reactions (why we also avoid foods that have nothing to do with insulin spikes)

I didn't know that

Thanks for this informative post !

Yup, notice how it's generally people that are overweight or obese that are diagnosed as being Type II Diabetics?

Based on the above, the more abdominal fat you have, the more TNF-a you will produce. So I guess that's why people that are overweight or obese find that if they can reduce 4% - 5% of their body fat, their symptoms improve.

Of course, for us thin or underweight folks with Insulin Resistance, we must be getting some TNF-a from abdominal fat, but perhaps most of it is coming from an immune response esulting from one of several Hypersensitivity Reactions (probably Type III or IV).

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I could rattle off everything I know about this (which is a lot, I happen to live with a Diabetic and work at a company that deals exclusively with diabetes and obesity... I'm definitely not a low-carb guru), but that would be pointless... It would be just as jargon-y and unreadable as the rest of this.

I just mention low-carb gurus because this misconception has been promoted by them mainly

Insulin resistance occurs without any abnormality or weakness of the pancreas and occurs even if not too much carbs are eaten (since insulin is needed anyway to produce ATP for whatever substrate used by the body) and insuin resistance is not caused by eating a normal high-carb meal since high-protein meals increase insulin levels as well

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Wow! Thanks for all the explanations. It's very comlicated but I ghuess what your saying is that its when you body's cells are resistant to insulin and your pancreas overworks to make insulin causing high blood sugar...

Interesting how you are talking about abdominal fat. I am like 105 lbs.. everything on my body is super petite, except it seems like i always have excess tummy fat. Its not fat but ive always struggled with it.

Also i have been to the doctor twice this month and both times they take my blood pressure and said it was low... but in the past 2 months i have went from having a diet of ice cream and pizza.. to veggies and fruits, so that could explain it.

Danny, Shmelis, Sweet jade: You all are very smart! Not only with this topic, but it seems like you know just about everything... i wish i could comprehend all of this stuff so much easier. As I get older i have been asking the "why" question much more, because i want to know whats going on to fix the problem...

Is there anything we can do to prevent this or help treat it? I know you mentioned to eat small meals and exercise... anything else?

Thanks! ;)

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Wow! Thanks for all the explanations. It's very comlicated but I ghuess what your saying is that its when you body's cells are resistant to insulin and your pancreas overworks to make insulin causing high blood sugar...

Yes ... you explained this better than I did :(:D

But ... the high blood sugar is caused by cells being resistant to insulin hence not allowing the glucose in and letting it circulates in the blood stream hence increasing the amount of circulating sugar in the blood

When the pancreas overworks to make more insulin trying to make up for the loss of insulin-sensitivity of the cells often it actually causes low blood sugar by sending too much circulating glucose into the cells and leaving very little sugar in the blood and hence low blood sugar and hypoglycemia

Is there anything we can do to prevent this or help treat it? I know you mentioned to eat small meals and exercise... anything else?

Thanks! ;)

Losing abdominal fat

It doesn't matter how much a person is overweight or have fatty legs, fatty face, fatty arms, double chin ... all that matters is abdominal (visceral) fat

In fact visceral obesity is independent of normal obesity and excessive subcutaneous fat

In other words even a skinny person may suffrom from visceral obesity and having 25% body fat because of the visceral fat accumulated in the abdomen

The best way to lose abdominal fat is combining strenght training (light to moderate) with HIIT (High Intensity Interval Training)

This plus a sensible diet and smaller meals because eating bulky meal at one sitting increases post-prandial lipemia and glycemia

Avoiding refined products of course helps and essentially fatty acids help too as they are known to break down visceral fat. It's also sensible to eat lot of different veggies and greens and low-GI fruits because of their high content of phytochemicals. Certain plant phytochemicals too helps in breaking down visceral fat

The most known are the polyphenols of apples but they're mainly found in the skin

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Guest Stu :-)

So in other words, if we eat a high GI food, the end result will be a big fall into low blood sugar with an abundance of IGF1 etc floating around in the blood stream leading onto excess androgens?

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Okay so i get the part that your cells resist letting the insulin in, making it flow throughout your blood stream. But how would that make you have low blood sugar? Is it because your body detects that you are low with insulin in the actual cell?

Also Is being insulin resistant something that is genetic or do you get it from having a poor diet and lifestyle. I am almost positive i have this because i have always been thin but my stomach is a little fatty compared to the rest of my body. I mean i have chicken legs haha and skinny arms but a pouch of fat on my lower stomach and around my sides (love handles :doh: ) I dont freak out about it, but it just doesnt seem proportional to the rest of my body.

Well healthy diet and exercise it is for me! Oh! and btw I absolutely hate doing abs... it makes it look even worse because my muscles stick out! :wacko:

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So in other words, if we eat a high GI food, the end result will be a big fall into low blood sugar with an abundance of IGF1 etc floating around in the blood stream leading onto excess androgens?

No the end result will be high blood sugar, which insulin will come along and reduce, (it can reduce it too much causing low blood sugar, this is often refered to as getting a burst of energy then crashing but this is more of a problem for hypoglycemics). Your body produces all that insulin, not to prevent you getting fat, but to prevent you from dying.

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Also Is being insulin resistant something that is genetic or do you get it from having a poor diet and lifestyle. I am almost positive i have this because i have always been thin but my stomach is a little fatty compared to the rest of my body. I mean i have chicken legs haha and skinny arms but a pouch of fat on my lower stomach and around my sides (love handles :doh: ) I dont freak out about it, but it just doesnt seem proportional to the rest of my body.

Its not genetic and I dont think thats an acurate way to diagnose yourself. :D

Well healthy diet and exercise it is for me! Oh! and btw I absolutely hate doing abs... it makes it look even worse because my muscles stick out! :wacko:

Exercise/Diet will make IR go away, working on your obliques and those muscles at the sides (i can't remember the name) flattens your abs.

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...and what can we conclude if a person is skinny like the most of us here?

Diabetes is usually associated with overweight. So, generally speaking, should skinny persons really worry?

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Guest Stu :-)

There's a huge assortment of inflammatory products associated with Insulin Resistance, Diabetes, and ...Acne, but one of which that is to blame for damaging Glut-4 is TNF-a (tumor necrosis factor alpha).

TNF-a is present when you have too much IGF-1 (insulin-like growth factor-1) for those concerned with acne (or cancer), and is produce by Abdominal Fat and as an immune response in hypersensitivity reactions (why we also avoid foods that have nothing to do with insulin spikes)

I didn't know that

Thanks for this informative post !

Yup, notice how it's generally people that are overweight or obese that are diagnosed as being Type II Diabetics?

Based on the above, the more abdominal fat you have, the more TNF-a you will produce. So I guess that's why people that are overweight or obese find that if they can reduce 4% - 5% of their body fat, their symptoms improve.

Of course, for us thin or underweight folks with Insulin Resistance, we must be getting some TNF-a from abdominal fat, but perhaps most of it is coming from an immune response esulting from one of several Hypersensitivity Reactions (probably Type III or IV).

Jade, you've made some quality posts about all this information. Can you not put the links into your signature or make them a sticky?

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...and what can we conclude if a person is skinny like the most of us here?

Diabetes is usually associated with overweight. So, generally speaking, should skinny persons really worry?

Yes, skinny people should worry

Insulin resistance is linked to a condition called "central obesity" which means that all the excess fat is located in the abdominal area and is visceral fat

People suffering with central obesity may and are often skinny as hell with long thin arms and legs and thin faces.

While obesity is known as the "pear shaped body" central obesity is known as the "apple shaped body" so it's not uncommon to find "fake lean people" who are actually fat but don't carry much subcutaneous fat and may often be underweight even. Leaness and skinniness are different and being skinny doesn't mean being thin/lean

Skinniness is often fatness ... just of another kind

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Okay so i get the part that your cells resist letting the insulin in, making it flow throughout your blood stream. But how would that make you have low blood sugar? Is it because your body detects that you are low with insulin in the actual cell?

Because overproduction of insulin becomes so effective sometimes in overcoming the cells resistance that too much blood sugar is sent into the cell and therefore too little sugar is left in the blood. This results in a sudden decrease in blood sugar and an hypoglycemic seizure or strong weakness

Also Is being insulin resistant something that is genetic or do you get it from having a poor diet and lifestyle. I am almost positive i have this because i have always been thin but my stomach is a little fatty compared to the rest of my body. I mean i have chicken legs haha and skinny arms but a pouch of fat on my lower stomach and around my sides (love handles :doh: ) I dont freak out about it, but it just doesnt seem proportional to the rest of my body.

Well, just because you may have too much visceral fat it doesn't mean you have insulin resistance if you don't have other symptoms too but of course visceral fat with time may contribute to develop resistance to insulin and other symptoms typical of Syndrome-X

It's rather hard to burn abdominal fat but if you've patience and consistence some very light strength training and High Intensity Interval Training will reduce your waist size in a matter of months

You don't need to do lot of crunches though ... you just have to burn the fat all over your body but since you have no subcutaneous fat the exercise will burn the visceral fat first in your case

Don't worry too much though ...

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Here's all you need to worry about:

Exercise every day.

Sleep as well as you can.

Avoid baked goods, fruit juices, pop drinks.

Eat a whole foods diet but only include any substantial amount of grains (by substantial I mean the whole meal consists of it with things on the side) if you're an athlete and burn them up quick. 5-9 fruits and vegetables a day, high quality meat, legumes, nuts, seeds, etc.

And there you go, insulin resistance will reverse.

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sweetjade,myself and others have posted manytopic on this in the past. A search would give you lots of info(Especially sweetjades ones). I'm just chiming in to say that no, no abs exercises will flatten out your stomach. Targeted fat loss is a myth,it just doesn't happen no matter how many infomercials tell you they can sculpt your abs.

Everyone has good abs and a fairly good midsection.We use it everyday all day. Sitting, walking, standing,etc... Abs are muscles like the forearms.They don't get bigger with heavy weight exercises but rather medium or light ones with more reps. Ie. just being normally active will give you a decent core as your abs will always be working.

The only real way to show off those abs is to do cardio and diet. Of course if vthe rest of you is tiny,you should ask yourself if you really need to lose any fat? Especially if you are a girl as you need more bodyfat than men.

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The only real way to show off those abs is to do cardio and diet. Of course if vthe rest of you is tiny,you should ask yourself if you really need to lose any fat? Especially if you are a girl as you need more bodyfat than men.

Visceral body fat is almost all to lose

3% visceral fat is needed in that zone to protect the organs the rest has to go because it's one of the most dangerous things for the body

If the body subcutaneous fat is already at a normal level than HIIT, strength training and better diet will mobilitate the visceral fat leaving the rest practically untouched

But I would avoid dieting, often it's best to increase your BRM, exercise and eat at libitum ... visceral fat often is burned even if there's no caloric deficiency

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Guest Stu :-)

Have any of you guys noticed a decrease in sebum production having taken up excercise and diet? How long do you think it would take to see results? I remember starting to jog few months back, but only 3-4 days in the week and only for a duration of three weeks. I suppose thats a lot to ask for in that space of time?

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This results in a sudden decrease in blood sugar and an hypoglycemic seizure or strong weakness

I love the oxymoron! :)

Bryan

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