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Benzoyl Peroxide --> Skin Damage?

Guest Grow_To_Overthrow

It makes you photosensitive, so an SPF cream is required. It dries the skin, so redness and flakes are bound to happen. And lastly, it's an oxidant. So yes, it does age the skin. Why i think GA is a better option; Gets rid of acne, improves skin tone and promotes Collagen production.

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URGENT BENZOYL PEROXIDE WARNING!*

Benzoyl peroxide generates free radicals in the skin. Its effect is similar to unprotected sun exposure. The redness of the skin (erythema), caused by sun exposure and benzoyl peroxide, is the result of free radicals (oxidative stress) upon the skin. Repeated sun exposure or benzoyl peroxide use generates free radicals that damage the skin's structure and cellular DNA, resulting in premature aging of the skin. The extent of the damage and aging from benzoyl peroxide is determined by the concentration of benzoyl peroxide, the frequency of application, and the duration of its use.

Because benzoyl peroxide generates free radicals, it interferes with and slows the healing process. The red and brown marks that are a part of the acne healing process may last weeks longer when benzoyl peroxide is a regular part of the daily regimen.

Benzoyl peroxide has been linked to cancer for a number of years and many research journal entries state "benzoyl peroxide is a free radical-generating skin tumor promoting agent." Performing a word search of the words "benzoyl peroxide cancer" in PubMed in the National Library of Medicine produces 102 articles from medical publications dealing with research aspects of benzoyl peroxide and cancer. About two-thirds of the research supports linkage between benzoyl peroxide and skin cancer.

"In 1995 the FDA changed benzoyl peroxide from a Category I (safe) to a Category III (safety is uncertain) ingredient and stated this action (56 FR 37622) was based on new information that raised a safety concern regarding benzoyl peroxide as a tumor promoter in mice ..." Additionally the FDA charged manufacturers with the responsibility of providing this information to consumers so they could make educated decisions. A more complete FDA statement is at the bottom of this page, for your reference.

got that off of eastparkresearch.com

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It makes you photosensitive, so an SPF cream is required. It dries the skin, so redness and flakes are bound to happen. And lastly, it's an oxidant. So yes, it does age the skin. Why i think GA is a better option; Gets rid of acne, improves skin tone and promotes Collagen production.

hmm...

1) what exactly do you mean by "oxidant"? carcinogenic?

2) and do you view GA as a better option to replace BP? or to replace AHA?

Okay now im getting scared :(

me too, mandy, having just read retaliate's post. :(

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Guest Grow_To_Overthrow

It makes you photosensitive, so an SPF cream is required. It dries the skin, so redness and flakes are bound to happen. And lastly, it's an oxidant. So yes, it does age the skin. Why i think GA is a better option; Gets rid of acne, improves skin tone and promotes Collagen production.

hmm...

1) what exactly do you mean by "oxidant"? carcinogenic?

2) and do you view GA as a better option to replace BP? or to replace AHA?

BP is a chemical compound that readily gives up Oxygen. That's why it's used to treat Acne, bacteria doesn't survive in an Oxygen infested Environment.

This Oxygen causes Free Radical Damage.

"Free radicals are unstable oxygen molecules that have only one electron instead of two. Because electrons are found in pairs, the molecule must scavenge other molecules for another electron. When the second molecule loses its electron to the first molecule, it must then find another electron repeating the process. This process can damage cell function and alter genetic material. Free radical damage causes wrinkles by activating the metalloproteinases that break down collagen. They cause cancer by changing the genetic material, RNA and DNA, of the cell."

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Guest Grow_To_Overthrow

I almost failed chemistry :( This stuff is so hard to understand lol.

Is this stuff all long term though?

Well it's cumulative from my understanding of things. Time doesn't heal DNA damage.

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URGENT BENZOYL PEROXIDE WARNING!*

Benzoyl peroxide generates free radicals in the skin. Its effect is similar to unprotected sun exposure. The redness of the skin (erythema), caused by sun exposure and benzoyl peroxide, is the result of free radicals (oxidative stress) upon the skin. Repeated sun exposure or benzoyl peroxide use generates free radicals that damage the skin's structure and cellular DNA, resulting in premature aging of the skin. The extent of the damage and aging from benzoyl peroxide is determined by the concentration of benzoyl peroxide, the frequency of application, and the duration of its use.

Because benzoyl peroxide generates free radicals, it interferes with and slows the healing process. The red and brown marks that are a part of the acne healing process may last weeks longer when benzoyl peroxide is a regular part of the daily regimen.

Benzoyl peroxide has been linked to cancer for a number of years and many research journal entries state "benzoyl peroxide is a free radical-generating skin tumor promoting agent." Performing a word search of the words "benzoyl peroxide cancer" in PubMed in the National Library of Medicine produces 102 articles from medical publications dealing with research aspects of benzoyl peroxide and cancer. About two-thirds of the research supports linkage between benzoyl peroxide and skin cancer.

"In 1995 the FDA changed benzoyl peroxide from a Category I (safe) to a Category III (safety is uncertain) ingredient and stated this action (56 FR 37622) was based on new information that raised a safety concern regarding benzoyl peroxide as a tumor promoter in mice ..." Additionally the FDA charged manufacturers with the responsibility of providing this information to consumers so they could make educated decisions. A more complete FDA statement is at the bottom of this page, for your reference.

got that off of eastparkresearch.com

if BP was that bad it would'nt be sold without a prescription. there is nothing wrong with BP. however it

appears to me thatwebsite eastparkresearch.com is trying to make their product sound like the best thing ever by criticizing BP as like some adveretising strategy.

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okay, here's truth:

I've said this in other threads, but i'll repeat myself here in somewhat layman terms. Benzoyl peroxide is broken down into oxygen and benzoic acid by our skin cells via an enzyme that resides in the peroxisomes called catalase. Suffice it to say that this enzyme, by the end of the reaction, does NOT produce free radicals of any kind (in this case, you guys are referring to superoxide radicals, or in other words, "free radical oxygens"). If you want to know more about the proposed catalase mechanisms, visit Pubmed: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed.

In fact, catalase is near or at the end of a pathway the body uses to get rid of reactive oxygen species such as the superoxide radical, which are produced as a consequence of oxygen metabolism. The superoxide radicals are actually removed by the enzyme superoxide dismutase, which converts two superoxide anions to hydrogen peroxide. The enzyme is very efficient, and the reaction proceeds extremely rapidly. You guys are right in that the superoxide radical will cause breakdown of nucleic acids (DNA/RNA) and proteins, which is why the body has evolved such an efficient enzyme to remove it. The peroxide is then converted into harmless oxygen and water by our friend, catalase.

Ironically, P. acnes is an obligate anaerobe. Obligate anaerobes do not have superoxide dismutase, and so they die in the presence of oxygen because they cannot deplete the reactive oxygen species that arise as a by-product of oxidation-reduction reactions.

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Guest Grow_To_Overthrow

Nice reply, that was a great read. :D

Also, i noticed the products that you're considering. I can only assume they're for red marks and some hyperpigmentation? Have you looked into Retinols?

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hy see free radicals are almost everywhere... in sunlight , zig smoke , when watching TV , walking on a street next to a busy road , bla bla bla...

please dont fall into panic ...

Thoose free radicals can be stopped when u take Vit.C or drink normal Green or Red Tea.

and remember eveything brings side effects , i could tell u about side effects when u eat to much meat lol...so there is no reason to be scared

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yeah, everything brings side effects, when you just worry and over-analyze things it makes you kind of paranoid about everything.

i have been using BP products for almost a year and a half, and i look fine. And what KKsavas said, free radicals are everywhere. Its not like you can just avoid them completely, then you would just hang around all day in a confined room.

and that whole bp causing cancer thing still sounds like bull to me. I havent heard of anyone getting cancer because they used BP for a few years to stop their acne.

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I've said this in other threads, but i'll repeat myself here in somewhat layman terms. Benzoyl peroxide is broken down into oxygen and benzoic acid by our skin cells via an enzyme that resides in the peroxisomes called catalase. Suffice it to say that this enzyme, by the end of the reaction, does NOT produce free radicals of any kind (in this case, you guys are referring to superoxide radicals, or in other words, "free radical oxygens"). If you want to know more about the proposed catalase mechanisms, visit Pubmed: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed.

In fact, catalase is near or at the end of a pathway the body uses to get rid of reactive oxygen species such as the superoxide radical, which are produced as a consequence of oxygen metabolism. The superoxide radicals are actually removed by the enzyme superoxide dismutase, which converts two superoxide anions to hydrogen peroxide. The enzyme is very efficient, and the reaction proceeds extremely rapidly. You guys are right in that the superoxide radical will cause breakdown of nucleic acids (DNA/RNA) and proteins, which is why the body has evolved such an efficient enzyme to remove it. The peroxide is then converted into harmless oxygen and water by our friend, catalase.

Ironically, P. acnes is an obligate anaerobe. Obligate anaerobes do not have superoxide dismutase, and so they die in the presence of oxygen because they cannot deplete the reactive oxygen species that arise as a by-product of oxidation-reduction reactions.

That definitely cleared up some confusions. Cheers.

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Cant trust everything you see on the internet. They claimed that hydrogen peroxide also causes free radicals, but my great grandmother rinsed her mouth with it everyday and she lived to be 100 years old. :ninja:

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So which one is true?? The one that says BP doesnt cause aging or the one that says it doesnt?? I've been to two derms, one said BP doesnt cause aging, one said BP does. I am so confused. In my experience though Bp did give me a few lines :(

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Nice reply, that was a great read. :D

Also, i noticed the products that you're considering. I can only assume they're for red marks and some hyperpigmentation? Have you looked into Retinols?

Thanks :D

I haven't really extensively looked into retinol itself, but from what I know about other retinoids (accutane, tazorac), they increase cell turnover rate, temporarily boost collagen production, and possibly lower sebum production. I will put it on my list of things to try out after the GA/AHA. Getting rid of red marks is quite difficult, but it's fascinating how some solutions work for others and some don't - a testament to the fact that skin is very different from one person to the next.

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*"URGENT BENZOYL PEROXIDE WARNING!*... Benzoyl peroxide generates free radicals in the skin... About two-thirds of the research supports linkage between benzoyl peroxide and skin cancer..."

*"BP is a chemical compound that readily gives up Oxygen. That's why it's used to treat Acne, bacteria doesn't survive in an Oxygen infested Environment. This Oxygen causes Free Radical Damage..."

*"I almost failed chemistry This stuff is so hard to understand lol."

*"if BP was that bad it would'nt be sold without a prescription. there is nothing wrong with BP. however it appears to me thatwebsite eastparkresearch.com is trying to make their product sound like the best thing ever by criticizing BP as like some adveretising strategy."

*"okay, here's truth: I've said this in other threads, but i'll repeat myself here in somewhat layman terms. Benzoyl peroxide is broken down into oxygen and benzoic acid by our skin cells via an enzyme that resides in the peroxisomes called catalase. Suffice it to say that this enzyme, by the end of the reaction, does NOT produce free radicals of any kind (in this case, you guys are referring to superoxide radicals, or in other words, "free radical oxygens")..." [by "wheresmystar"]

*"hy see free radicals are almost everywhere... in sunlight , zig smoke , when watching TV , walking on a street next to a busy road , bla bla bla... please dont fall into panic ... Thoose free radicals can be stopped when u take Vit.C or drink normal Green or Red Tea..."

*"i have been using BP products for almost a year and a half, and i look fine. And what KKsavas said, free radicals are everywhere. Its not like you can just avoid them completely, then you would just hang around all day in a confined room. and that whole bp causing cancer thing still sounds like bull to me. I havent heard of anyone getting cancer because they used BP for a few years to stop their acne."

*"All I have to say is that it appears "wheresmystar" did not fail chemistry!"

*"That definitely cleared up some confusions. Cheers."

*"Cant trust everything you see on the internet. They claimed that hydrogen peroxide also causes free radicals, but my great grandmother rinsed her mouth with it everyday and she lived to be 100 years old."

*"So which one is true?? The one that says BP doesnt cause aging or the one that says it doesnt?? I've been to two derms, one said BP doesnt cause aging, one said BP does. I am so confused. In my experience though Bp did give me a few lines"

ok, 2 initial disclaimers:

1) i didn't include people's names by their quotes b/c it would've taken up way too much space. but these are all quotes from this thread (and in chronological order), so if you want to go back & read the full posts, they're all there.

2) i also don't write any of the following to offend anyone (though i'm guessing it will offend some, and/or trigger retaliation) -- i write it to be honest, and to encourage ongoing discussion.

so here we go...

just because a person pastes fancy quotations from scientific websites, or presents his/her argument in colorful scientific jargon, it doesn't appoint that person Definitive Authority on the issue. in the BP debate, as well as in the scientific world as a whole, it concerns me when people not only exalt those who employ the grandiose terminology, but simultaneously write off "laypeople's" experiences simply because they don't have specific scientific backgrounds. i have a degree in health from UC berkeley, but that doesn't make me any more capable than anyone else (or less capable, just b/c my degree wasn't in chemistry or biochemistry) of noticing discoloration on my skin, and a cause-and-effect relationship of that discoloration with my use of BP.

scientific studies are constantly "proving" things for sure... i have read about studies that "proved" BP wasn't harmful, and also studies that refuted those first studies. as someone else said, and i agree, you shouldn't "trust" as a given anything you read on the internet -- and sometimes even the medical journals amend their prior conclusions.

ultimately (like many of the issues i've seen debated on these boards), there are scientific studies demonstrating both sides of the BP issue, and i think the bottom line is that nobody knows as an absolute certainty whether it is "safe," causes permanent skin damage, or may be carcinogenic. each of us should be discerning and thoughtful in the choices that we make as individuals, including topical medications that we choose to use on long term bases. which includes the CSR, as it is meant to be used over a period of years (until no longer needed).

as for my own experience, i have watched BP do all of the following to my skin at various times -- some of them favorable, and some not so favorable:

1) clear up acne.

2) turn it red.

3) make it itchy.

4) darken it, from my naturally fair tone to an unnatural "tanned" tone.

5) (despite aggressive use of moisturizer) dry it out to the point where it caused additional lines/wrinkles, and accentuated mild laugh lines that were already present.

i have read posts on this site from other people, listing various combinations of all of the above effects on their skin, as well as other effects i haven't experienced myself.

the CSR has worked wonders for so many of us who have struggled for years with acne, which is at once psychologically and physically debilitating. of course, none of us wants BP to be damaging, or -- god forbid -- carcinogenic in the long term. so i think there's a natural desire there to hear someone say "it's perfectly safe" and kind of shut our eyes to the whole thing, and go on enjoying our clear skin. someone also said earlier in this thread, that there are risks in lots of things, and that you can't just live your life paranoid, and all that. i totally agree. but i also think that when you're applying a topical chemical to your skin, in the long term, especially, it is only prudent to be open to hearing (and participating in) ongoing discussions about the safety of that chemical.

something interesting to think about: i read somewhere that you shouldn't apply anything to your skin that you wouldn't eat, because you're still ingesting it, and ultimately, that's the same thing.

anyway, as i stated when i posted this thread yesterday, "it's [bP is] the best thing i've got right now, when my foremost priority is waging war on this raging pimple battlefield on my chin. so i'm doing it anyway."

but i say that with open eyes.

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ultimately (like many of the issues i've seen debated on these boards), there are scientific studies demonstrating both sides of the BP issue, and i think the bottom line is that nobody knows as an absolute certainty whether it is "safe," causes permanent skin damage, or may be carcinogenic. each of us should be discerning and thoughtful in the choices that we make as individuals, including topical medications that we choose to use on long term bases. which includes the CSR, as it is meant to be used over a period of years (until no longer needed).

I partially agree. You cannot believe everything you read on the internet. And you are right, we don't know for sure if BP is "safe", etc. However, using the scientific method we can elucidate certain biochemical pathways (such as the one I described in my post) and design other experiments to figure out how BP effects us. Since we all have different physiological conditions, these scientific studies do not directly apply to us - but they do a damn good job of covering the majority.

I appreciate that you remind us to be discerning and thoughtful. I should remind you that this thread and its contents have been written because we are.

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Guest Grow_To_Overthrow

Nice reply, that was a great read. :D

Also, i noticed the products that you're considering. I can only assume they're for red marks and some hyperpigmentation? Have you looked into Retinols?

Thanks :D

I haven't really extensively looked into retinol itself, but from what I know about other retinoids (accutane, tazorac), they increase cell turnover rate, temporarily boost collagen production, and possibly lower sebum production. I will put it on my list of things to try out after the GA/AHA. Getting rid of red marks is quite difficult, but it's fascinating how some solutions work for others and some don't - a testament to the fact that skin is very different from one person to the next.

Yeah it's very true that skin care is quite individual in regards to its benefits. I've personally found that combining AHA's and Vitamin A products (retinols, treinoins, retinoids) or whatever you want to call them, is very effective in regards to Sebum production, cell turnover and unclogging of pores.

The cell turnover does alot of great things for Acne prone skin IMO and the Vit A restores correct cell structure. I suppose i'm just finding that they really do treat the major mechanisms of acne whilst improving scars, PIH and alot of other stuff.

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