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I've read about accutane and it seems that it is just a modified vitamin A. High doses of vitamin A are dangerous so accutane was designed so that you can take lots of it - this is what I understand on the topic. Recently I have started taking 10,000IU of vitamin A after breakfast and 10,000IU after dinner. I have noticed that I produce less sebum on my face. I have a very oil skin type, often by the time I get to university, I'll wipe the back of my hand on my forehead and the oil is visible on my hand. I believe that the vitamin A has greatly reduced my oil production. I also think that less acne has been forming because of this.

A lot of people acknowledge that accutane works but it seems like not many people try vitamin A?!? Also note that vitamin A works best with vitamin E, the B vitamins and Zinc. Also note that EFA (essential fatty acids) are required for good skin - thats a FACT - whether or not it will help acne, I dont know.

Also, I dont see much about tea tree oil on this website. In my experience tea tree oil helps alot. I use thursday plantations acne daily facewash as my cleanser (available in Australia) and my skin looks and feels a lot better afterwards. Recently, after I started using lots of BP and putting it on gently I noticed an immediate result overnight and my acne has been getting alot better.

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Too much Vitamin A is toxic.

The retinol form of Vitamin A (very toxic) is used to treat acne.

You might want to look into overdosing on B5 rather than A.

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As I am a qualified dermatologist...

Vitamin A (aka Retinol) is a fat-soluble vitamin. Taking exessive doses, usually over 100,000IU will cause toxicity. This occurs because retinol cannot be dissolved in water and flushed out of the body. Instead, it is stored within the liver. Over time, bad side effects may occur.

Cod liver oil is an excellent source of vitamin A. Carrots contain the precursor, known as beta carotene. Your body would process the beta carotene and through many chemical reactions, turn it into vitamin A. However, the ratio of usable vitamin A derived from such a precursor is quite small.

As for acne, retinol is related to retinal and isotretinoin. Keep in mind that isotretinoin forms a deco-angular bond with two existing carbon atoms, causing it to lose the familiar hexagonal structure found at the end of the transcription host molecule and gain an extra oxygen atom. (13-cis). An alteration of DNA transcription is the process initiated by isoteretinoin before the sebum production is lessened. It is thereotically possible that retinol can do the same.

However, although 10000iu is not enough to initiate toxicity, higher dosages exceeding 120,000iu can cause mild toxicity in many people.

This conversation reminds me of a patient I once knew. He also believed in vitamin A and ironically, refused to take tetracyclines that I had wanted to perscribe for him. He improved, very gradually though. During my early years just after residency from medical school, I attributed it to the placebo effect.

Ah.. good times.

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Too much Vitamin A is toxic.

The retinol form of Vitamin A (very toxic) is used to treat acne.

The toxicity of natural vitamin A is overrated. You can greatly reduce vitamin A toxicity, when you combine it with vitamin D.

In 2003, Myhre and other researchers examined all 291 cases of hypervitaminosis A in humans reported in the medical literature between 1944 and 2000. Of these, the Myhre team identified 81 reports that provided information about the patient's vitamin D supplementation, and found that concomitant supplementation with vitamin D radically increased the dose of vitamin A needed to cause toxicity. Unfortunately, the researchers only mentioned whether vitamin D was supplemented at all and did not discuss the specific amount of vitamin D being supplemented. Nevertheless, they found that the median dose reported for vitamin A toxicity was over 2,300 IU per kilogram (kg) of body weight per day higher when vitamin D was also supplemented. For a hypothetical 75-kg person representing the median, vitamin D supplementation would have allowed an additional 175,000 IU per day (the amount in five tablespoons of high-vitamin cod liver oil) before toxicity symptoms were likely to be reported!

Just as the higher quality studies demonstrate a relationship between vitamin A and osteoporosis, the higher quality studies among those that report both vitamin A status and vitamin D status demonstrate that whether vitamin A is harmful or healthful depends on whether sufficient vitamin D is consumed with it.

Check out this very fascinating articles:

http://www.westonaprice.org/basicnutrition...mina-osteo.html

http://www.westonaprice.org/basicnutrition/vitaminasaga.html

The best way to take vitamin A is taking a high quality cod liver oil, as it contains natural vitamin A AND vitamin d (the antagonist of vitamin A).

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Too much Vitamin A is toxic.

The retinol form of Vitamin A (very toxic) is used to treat acne.

The toxicity of natural vitamin A is overrated. You can greatly reduce vitamin A toxicity, when you combine it with vitamin D.

In 2003, Myhre and other researchers examined all 291 cases of hypervitaminosis A in humans reported in the medical literature between 1944 and 2000. Of these, the Myhre team identified 81 reports that provided information about the patient's vitamin D supplementation, and found that concomitant supplementation with vitamin D radically increased the dose of vitamin A needed to cause toxicity. Unfortunately, the researchers only mentioned whether vitamin D was supplemented at all and did not discuss the specific amount of vitamin D being supplemented. Nevertheless, they found that the median dose reported for vitamin A toxicity was over 2,300 IU per kilogram (kg) of body weight per day higher when vitamin D was also supplemented. For a hypothetical 75-kg person representing the median, vitamin D supplementation would have allowed an additional 175,000 IU per day (the amount in five tablespoons of high-vitamin cod liver oil) before toxicity symptoms were likely to be reported!

Just as the higher quality studies demonstrate a relationship between vitamin A and osteoporosis, the higher quality studies among those that report both vitamin A status and vitamin D status demonstrate that whether vitamin A is harmful or healthful depends on whether sufficient vitamin D is consumed with it.

Check out this very fascinating articles:

http://www.westonaprice.org/basicnutrition...mina-osteo.html

http://www.westonaprice.org/basicnutrition/vitaminasaga.html

The best way to take vitamin A is taking a high quality cod liver oil, as it contains natural vitamin A AND vitamin d (the antagonist of vitamin A).

Makes sense.

That is why sunlight is necessary to get vitamin D.

Dr mercola was right!

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This is a citation of the following study:

Int J Dermatol. 1981 Nov;20(9):616.

Synergism of vitamins A and E in acne vulgaris.

Ayres S Jr, Mihan R.

By using a combination of vitamin A and vitamin E orally with several other modal modalities we have obtained excellent results with no undesirable side-effects; moreover, in most instances there is no need for antibiotics. The advantage of this therapy is that it is available; the retinoic acid derivatives, on the other hand, may be restricted to investigational use for a number of years.

The rationale for the combined use of vitamins A and E is based on the proven synergism of these two vitamins, as reported by Ames in a symposium on vitamin A presented at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Ames demonstrated that laboratory rats maintained on a vitamin E-deficient diet showed a low vitamin A blood level despite the amount of vitamin A administered orally or even by injection. When vitamin E was added to the diet, the vitamin A blood level became normal.

Therapeutic Regimen for Acne

Our new regimen for the treatment of acne is divided into two parts: things for the patient to do and things for the patient to avoid.

Things for the Patient to Do

1. Vitamin A (preferably water soluble) 50,000 IU twice a day before meals.

2. Vitamin E in the form of d,alpha-tocopheryl acetate or succinate, 400 IU twice a day before meals. (Patients with hypertension or diabetics on insulin should begin with a dose of 100 IU and gradually increase the dosage.)

3. Pyridoxine )Vitamin B-6) 50 mg once or twice a day for women whose acne flares before or during menstruation.

4. Benzoyl peroxide 5 percent gel applied at night, after washing affected areas gently with a nonmedicated soap without scrubbing.

5. A well balanced diet, low in fat and sugars.

Things for the Patient to Avoid

1. Inorganic iron, including mineral supplements and white bread and cereals reinforced with iron, since inorganic iron combines with and inactivates vitamin E.

2. Female hormones, including birth control pills, which have an antagonistic effect with vitamin E.

3. Extra iodine, including iodized salt and kelp, since iodine can aggravate acne.

4. Commercial soft drinks some of which contain brominated vegetable oils as stabiliziers, since bromine can also aggravate acne.

5. Excessiv milk (not over one glass a day), since milk contains hormones which can aggravate acne.

6. Vitamin B12 which has been reported as producing or aggravating acne.

Under this regimen good to excellent improvement is usually manifest within a period of six to eight weeks. It should be continued for several months and if the acne clears the vitamin A and E dosage can be gradually reduced to a maintenance level, but can be continued safely over a period of several years if necessary. We have observed no undesirable side-effects.

In accordance with the aforementioned regimen, we observed 98 patients with acne of the mild, moderate, and severe type. Thirty-one of the 98 patients had had acne for ten years or more, and many of them had taken oral antibiotics without lasting benefit over a period of months or years.

Results of the acne regimen in these 98 patients are as follows: Ninety (91.83 percent) of the patients had a good to excellent response; 2 (2.04 percent) had a poor response; and 42 (42.8 percent) had 90-100 percent clearing of their condition in two months or less.

The 98 patients in this study have been using this acne regimen for the past several years. None of the patients had used antibiotics, either orally or topically. Moreover, all of them had good to excellent response to treatment within a period of weeks or several months.

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This is a citation of the following study:

Int J Dermatol. 1981 Nov;20(9):616.

Synergism of vitamins A and E in acne vulgaris.

Ayres S Jr, Mihan R.

By using a combination of vitamin A and vitamin E orally with several other modal modalities we have obtained excellent results with no undesirable side-effects; moreover, in most instances there is no need for antibiotics. The advantage of this therapy is that it is available; the retinoic acid derivatives, on the other hand, may be restricted to investigational use for a number of years.

The rationale for the combined use of vitamins A and E is based on the proven synergism of these two vitamins, as reported by Ames in a symposium on vitamin A presented at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Ames demonstrated that laboratory rats maintained on a vitamin E-deficient diet showed a low vitamin A blood level despite the amount of vitamin A administered orally or even by injection. When vitamin E was added to the diet, the vitamin A blood level became normal.

Therapeutic Regimen for Acne

Our new regimen for the treatment of acne is divided into two parts: things for the patient to do and things for the patient to avoid.

Things for the Patient to Do

1. Vitamin A (preferably water soluble) 50,000 IU twice a day before meals.

2. Vitamin E in the form of d,alpha-tocopheryl acetate or succinate, 400 IU twice a day before meals. (Patients with hypertension or diabetics on insulin should begin with a dose of 100 IU and gradually increase the dosage.)

3. Pyridoxine )Vitamin B-6) 50 mg once or twice a day for women whose acne flares before or during menstruation.

4. Benzoyl peroxide 5 percent gel applied at night, after washing affected areas gently with a nonmedicated soap without scrubbing.

5. A well balanced diet, low in fat and sugars.

Things for the Patient to Avoid

1. Inorganic iron, including mineral supplements and white bread and cereals reinforced with iron, since inorganic iron combines with and inactivates vitamin E.

2. Female hormones, including birth control pills, which have an antagonistic effect with vitamin E.

3. Extra iodine, including iodized salt and kelp, since iodine can aggravate acne.

4. Commercial soft drinks some of which contain brominated vegetable oils as stabiliziers, since bromine can also aggravate acne.

5. Excessiv milk (not over one glass a day), since milk contains hormones which can aggravate acne.

6. Vitamin B12 which has been reported as producing or aggravating acne.

Under this regimen good to excellent improvement is usually manifest within a period of six to eight weeks. It should be continued for several months and if the acne clears the vitamin A and E dosage can be gradually reduced to a maintenance level, but can be continued safely over a period of several years if necessary. We have observed no undesirable side-effects.

In accordance with the aforementioned regimen, we observed 98 patients with acne of the mild, moderate, and severe type. Thirty-one of the 98 patients had had acne for ten years or more, and many of them had taken oral antibiotics without lasting benefit over a period of months or years.

Results of the acne regimen in these 98 patients are as follows: Ninety (91.83 percent) of the patients had a good to excellent response; 2 (2.04 percent) had a poor response; and 42 (42.8 percent) had 90-100 percent clearing of their condition in two months or less.

The 98 patients in this study have been using this acne regimen for the past several years. None of the patients had used antibiotics, either orally or topically. Moreover, all of them had good to excellent response to treatment within a period of weeks or several months.

Excellent info THANKS!!!!!!

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Yeah, but please take care! I wouldn't recommend such high doses of vitamin A without adequate intake of vitamin D.

Also, too much vitamin E has some downsides:

I recently found an animal study showing that high intake of vitamin e can deplete vitamin k in extrahepatic tissues:

http://www.nutritionandmetabolism.com/content/3/1/29

High dosis of vitamin E should probably better be combined with coq10:

Why CoQ10 is needed by those who take vitamin E

There are additional pieces to the vitamin E puzzle. A series of groundbreaking studies by Roland Stocker and his colleagues at The Heart Research Institute in Sydney, Australia demonstrates that vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol) systematically promotes LDL oxidation. Stocker calls this pro-oxidant action of vitamin E “tocopherol-mediated peroxidation,” or TMP. Through the TMP process, vitamin E amplifies mild oxidative stresses so that they do much more damage to LDL.(9-11)

The good news is that Stocker’s group discovered that CoQ10 naturally present in the body protects against TMP. They showed that one molecule of CoQ10 can prevent two TMP chain reactions involving as many as 40 to 80 free radicals. In pilot studies they tested LDL from the blood of human subjects given vitamin E and/or CoQ10 supplements. CoQ10 supplements reduced TMP, while vitamin E supplements increased it. When given together, the CoQ10 supplement significantly counteracted the TMP side-effect of the vitamin E supplement.(12-14) Here is a conclusion from one of several studies that show that adequate levels of CoQ10 are required for vitamin E to function as an efficient antioxidant in the body:

“These results demonstrate that oral supplementation with alpha-tocopherol alone results in LDL that is more prone to oxidation initiation, whereas co-supplementation with coenzyme Q not only prevents this prooxidant activity of vitamin E but also provides the lipoprotein with increased resistance to oxidation.”

The work of Stocker and his colleagues agrees with other lines of recent research suggesting that CoQ10 cooperates with vitamin E in a complex partnership that we are only beginning to understand. Indeed these “co-antioxidants” are always found together in cell membranes and LDL. CoQ10 regenerates vitamin E, which would otherwise be quickly exhausted fighting oxidative stress. Vitamin E breaks off the chain reaction of lipid peroxidation, while CoQ10 helps to prevent it from starting.

The many studies of vitamin E supplementation published over the years did not take into account the CoQ10 naturally present in the body, but we can now see that this was a crucial factor. In these studies of vitamin E, CoQ10 served as the “silent partner,” amplifying the effect of vitamin E, regenerating vitamin E as it was exhausted, and preventing TMP.

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Clin Exp Dermatol. 2006 May;31(3):430-4.

Does the plasma level of vitamins A and E affect acne condition?

El-Akawi Z, Abdel-Latif N, Abdul-Razzak K.

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Jordan University of Science and Technology, School of

Medicine, Irbid, Jordan. [email protected]

BACKGROUND: Vitamin A and E are lipid soluble antioxidants that are necessary for our health. Deficiency in these vitamins can cause serious diseases. Administration of vitamin A and E to patients with acne was shown to improve their acne condition. AIMS: To test the relationship between plasma vitamin A and E levels and acne. METHODS: Plasma vitamin A and E concentrations were determined by high performance liquid chromatography in 100 newly diagnosed untreated patients with acne and were compared with those of 100 age-matched healthy controls. Patients were carefully graded using the Global Acne Grading System. RESULTS: We found that plasma vitamin A concentrations in patients with acne were significantly lower than those of the control group (336.5 vs. 418.1 mug/L, respectively) P = 0.007. We also found that plasma vitamin E concentrations in patients with acne were significantly lower than those of controls (5.4 vs. 5.9 mg/L) P = 0.05. In addition, we found that there is a strong relationship between decrease in plasma vitamin A levels and increase in the severity of acne condition.Patients with severe acne had significantly lower plasma concentrations of vitamins A and E than did those with lower acne grade and the age-matched healthy controls. DISCUSSION: Based on our results, we conclude that low vitamin A and E plasma levels have an important role in the pathogenesis of acne and in the aggravation of this condition.

PMID: 16681594 [PubMed - in process]

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Clin Exp Dermatol. 2006 May;31(3):430-4.

Does the plasma level of vitamins A and E affect acne condition?

El-Akawi Z, Abdel-Latif N, Abdul-Razzak K.

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Jordan University of Science and Technology, School of

Medicine, Irbid, Jordan. [email protected]

BACKGROUND: Vitamin A and E are lipid soluble antioxidants that are necessary for our health. Deficiency in these vitamins can cause serious diseases. Administration of vitamin A and E to patients with acne was shown to improve their acne condition. AIMS: To test the relationship between plasma vitamin A and E levels and acne. METHODS: Plasma vitamin A and E concentrations were determined by high performance liquid chromatography in 100 newly diagnosed untreated patients with acne and were compared with those of 100 age-matched healthy controls. Patients were carefully graded using the Global Acne Grading System. RESULTS: We found that plasma vitamin A concentrations in patients with acne were significantly lower than those of the control group (336.5 vs. 418.1 mug/L, respectively) P = 0.007. We also found that plasma vitamin E concentrations in patients with acne were significantly lower than those of controls (5.4 vs. 5.9 mg/L) P = 0.05. In addition, we found that there is a strong relationship between decrease in plasma vitamin A levels and increase in the severity of acne condition.Patients with severe acne had significantly lower plasma concentrations of vitamins A and E than did those with lower acne grade and the age-matched healthy controls. DISCUSSION: Based on our results, we conclude that low vitamin A and E plasma levels have an important role in the pathogenesis of acne and in the aggravation of this condition.

PMID: 16681594 [PubMed - in process]

PABA Are you actually using vitamin a? What do you think of dry vitamin a?

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PABA Are you actually using vitamin a? What do you think of dry vitamin a?

I take one teaspoon Garden Of Life cod liver oil every day, which gives me 4000 I.U. vitamin A. I also eat about 200 grams of liver once a week.

200 grams of calfs liver has 134.960 I.U. of vitamin A!

http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts-B00001-01c21DN.html

I also eat large amounts of animal fat (egg yolk, butter, fatty meat) which gives me additional vitamin A. You see, with my diet, it's not necessary to supplement any vitamin A.

I don't know whether dry vitamin A is better. I would use the same vitamin A, as they used in the study above, which is liquid vitamin A. However, the best way is always to get it trough food.

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PABA Are you actually using vitamin a? What do you think of dry vitamin a?

I take one teaspoon Garden Of Life cod liver oil every day, which gives me 4000 I.U. vitamin A. I also eat about 200 grams of liver once a week.

200 grams of calfs liver has 134.960 I.U. of vitamin A!

http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts-B00001-01c21DN.html

I also eat large amounts of animal fat (egg yolk, butter, fatty meat) which gives me additional vitamin A. You see, with my diet, it's not necessary to supplement any vitamin A.

I don't know whether dry vitamin A is better. I would use the same vitamin A, as they used in the study above, which is liquid vitamin A. However, the best way is always to get it trough food.

Paba!

Has the cod liver oil helped with your acne?

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Paba!

Has the cod liver oil helped with your acne?

Well, I'm almost totally clear, but this is mostly because of my low carb diet. I think, that cod liver oil is helping me too, because I also took krill oil for a while instead of cod liver oil and my skin was less clear during that time.

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