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This seems amazing!!!! I might try this, this is about effective as accutane!!!but safer!

Combination blue (415 nm) and red (633 nm) LED phototherapy in the treatment of mild to severe acne vulgaris.Goldberg DJ, Russell BA.

Skin Laser & Surgery Specialists of New York/New Jersey, and Department of Dermatology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10022, USA. [email protected]

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Acne vulgaris represents both a challenge to the treating dermatologist and a major concern for the patient. Conventional treatments have proved inconsistent with often unacceptable side effects and high rates of recurrence. Non-thermal, non-laser, phototherapy for acne with a combination of blue and red light has recently attracted attention. The present study was designed to assess the efficacy of this combination phototherapy. METHODS: Twenty-four subjects, Fitzpatrick skin types II-V, with mild to severe symmetric facial acne vulgaris were recruited for the study. Subjects were well matched at baseline in terms of both age and duration of acne. Subjects were treated over eight sessions, two per week 3 days apart, alternating between 415 nm blue light (20 minutes/session, 48 J/cm2) and 633 nm red light (20 minutes/session, 96 J/cm2) from a light-emitting diode (LED)-based therapy system. Patients received a mild microdermabrasion before each session. Acne was assessed at baseline and at weeks 2, 4, 8 and 12.

RESULTS: Twenty-two patients completed the trial. A mean reduction in lesion count was observed at all follow-up points. At the 4-week follow-up, the mean lesion count reduction was significant at 46% (p=0.001). At the 12-week follow-up, the mean lesion count reduction was also significant at 81% (p=0.001). Patient and dermatologist assessments were similar. Severe acne showed a marginally better response than mild acne. Side effects were minimal and transitory. Comedones did not respond as well as inflammatory lesions.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.f...l=pubmed_docsum

you can buy one here!!!!

http://www.acnelamp.com/order.php?lang=eng

has anyone ever used these?

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heres another study:

420 nm intense continuous light therapy for acne.

Department of Dermatology, Queen's Square Medical Center, Yokohama, Japan. [email protected]

BACKGROUND: Topical antibiotics, isotretinoin or systemic antibiotics are usually used for acne therapy. However, isotretinoin cannot be used during pregnancy because it can cause significant birth defects while systemic antibiotics can have adverse side effects such as gastrointestinal irritation, photosensitivity and tetracycline sensitivity. Describe here is a high-intensity, narrow-band, blue light (ClearLight) system, and its therapeutic clinical effect is investigated on acne using cutaneous measurements, bacterial observations and ultrastructural changes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 28 adult healthy volunteers with facial acne (mean age 28.1 years, range 16-56 years) were recruited for this study. They were treated with a total of eight serial biweekly 15-minute treatment sessions. Clinical counts of acne, as well as moisture, sebum and pH measurements were taken between each session. Nine of the 28 patients were followed for 2-3 months after the last treatment. Detection of bacteria in acne pustules was analyzed by culture and by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Ultrastructural changes were examined in eight patients after four sessions of the light therapy. RESULTS: All patients completed the study. Overall, there was a 64.7% improvement in acne lesions. There were no bacterial changes before or after the therapy, although damaged Propionibacterium acnes were observed at the ultrastructural level. CONCLUSIONS: ClearLight performed eight times over 4 weeks can be useful in the treatment of acne. Further investigation will be needed to elucidate the mechanism of action of ClearLight

and another:

The effective treatment of acne vulgaris by a high-intensity, narrow band 405-420 nm light source.

Elman M, Slatkine M, Harth Y.

Beit Harofim Holon, Israel.

BACKGROUND: Available topical treatments are slow and frequently irritating. Oral therapies may be associated with increased bacterial resistance (antibiotics) or possible severe side effects (oral isotretinoin). In vitro and in vivo exposure of acne bacteria to 405-420 nm ultraviolet (UV) free blue light results in the photo-destruction of these bacteria through the effects on the porphyrins produced naturally by Propionibacterium acnes. A novel, high-intensity, narrow band 420 nm UV free blue light has been shown to decrease inflammatory acne lesions after eight bi-weekly treatments. OBJECTIVES: To examine the effects of high-intensity, narrow band 420 nm UV free blue light (ClearLight) on inflammatory acne lesions. METHODS: Three studies were carried out to examine the clinical effects of high-intensity, narrow band blue light on papulo-pustular acne: the split-face dose-response study, the full-face open trial and the split-face, double-blind controlled study. The studies enrolled 10, 13 and 23 patients respectively. RESULTS: The data show more than an 80% response to 420 nm acne phototherapy with a significant reduction of 59-67% of inflammatory acne lesions after only eight treatments of 8-15 minutes. The reduction in lesions was steady in the follow-ups at 2, 4 and 8 weeks after the end of therapy. Prolonged remission was evident in the 8 weeks after the end of therapy. No adverse effects or patient discomfort were noted in any of the patients. CONCLUSIONS: Acne phototherapy by high intensity, narrow band 405-420 nm light is proven to be an attractive, fast, effective, non-invasive alternative to current topical and parenteral anti-acne remedies.

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I didn't read those entire posts, but if your referring to the traditional acne lamps that have been circulating around on some sites and eBay, then yeah they've been pretty much debunked.

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WOW!!! a thouroughly researched and scientifically proven device has been debunked by the acne.org community???? and yet weve got people on this board dicussung hocus pocus liver flushes????well show me your studies so that you can prove it to me.

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It's called the search function.

Just a few thoughts

If this acnelamp really was so effective (like BP) then every store would carry them, they'd be all over TV, internet pop-up ads, sunday morning infomercials, and an acne sufferer would die before selling his/her lamp to anyone.

If the claims were correct then there would be a very much decreased demand for Derms', little if any Accutane use, etc etc etc.

This thread would also be full of people talking it up like it was tasty candy.

Theese acne lamps have been around in one form or another for years, and a few people have been helped through light therapy (of various kinds) but it hasn't solved the problem for 90%+ of sufferers.

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t's called the search function.

Just a few thoughts

If this acnelamp really was so effective (like BP) then every store would carry them, they'd be all over TV, internet pop-up ads, sunday morning infomercials, and an acne sufferer would die before selling his/her lamp to anyone.

If the claims were correct then there would be a very much decreased demand for Derms', little if any Accutane use, etc etc etc.

This thread would also be full of people talking it up like it was tasty candy.

Theese acne lamps have been around in one form or another for years, and a few people have been helped through light therapy (of various kinds) but it hasn't solved the problem for 90%+ of sufferers.

Thanks.

ive had some time to research some past threads and all refer to the clearlight acne treatments that spas and derms charge out the ass for. This is what people say dont use, and also there are sites that sell blue and red light bulbs that people use but are not the same as the leds.

these lights that the more recent studies refer to are led light emitting diodes and i cant find anyone so far that has used these.

so to be specific has any bought an led system to use to kill bacteria and help inflammation on the skin?

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