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Checking your thyroid:

The thyroid gland secretes hormones that are important for controlling body metabolism. Poor thyroid fuction can lead to disease, including skin conditions, including acne. It is recommended to measuring your basal metabolic temperature as a simple way to check your thyroid function. This is done by inserting a thermommeter under your armpit for 10 minutes before getting out of bed in the morning over three or four consecutive days. An average temperature below 97.8 F may reflect low thyroid function, known medically as hypothyroidism. Temperatures above 98.2 f may indicate hyperthyroidism, or elevated thyroid function. Do not measure your temperature during a cold or the flu, or if you have other condiions that may raise your temperature. Menstruating women should take their temperature during the second, third, and fourth day of their period, since during ovulation basal temperature fluctuates. If you bassal body temperature is consistently low or high, notify your health professional, who may then want to order teests and recommend thyroid medication or other treatment. If your body temperature is low but you tests are normail, consider the following therapies, especially if you have fatigue, depression, low libido, water retention, dry skin, hhair loss, paleness, decreased sweating or slow wound healing, eat plenty of seaweed, which is rich in iodine, take zinc 15 to 60 mg per day,, selenium 200mcg per day, and iron if your anemic. Daily exercise can also help, but be careful no to exhaust yourslef.. Your holistic practitioner may be able to suggest specific herbal blends or thyroid glandular extract to address thyroid problem.

You can also try broccoli pills, I'm sure youve seen the post, they seem to be related to the thyroid. Sorry if there are spelling errors, I couldn't copy and past and so I had to type this while not seeing what I was typing. I got the info from a very informative ebook. @ healthconcerns.com

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I actually have hypothyroidism since I checked to see what it was a month or so ago. My temperature is like 1 or 2 degrees below normal. I only eat broccoli and take selenium occasionally though. Broccoli is an everyday thing and I hope it can help me out.

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Broccoli and Goitrogens

Broccoli contains goitrogens, naturally-occurring substances in certain foods that can interfere with the functioning of the thyroid gland. Individuals with already existing and untreated thyroid problems may want to avoid broccoli for this reason. Cooking may help to inactivate the goitrogenic compounds found in food. However, it is not clear from the research exactly what percent of goitrogenic compounds get inactivated by cooking, or exactly how much risk is involved with the consumption of broccoli by individuals with pre-existing and untreated thyroid problems.

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=9

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An average temperature below 97.8 F may reflect low thyroid function, known medically as hypothyroidism. Temperatures above 98.2 f may indicate hyperthyroidism, or elevated thyroid function.

Very important to keep in mind that the "average body temperature" is just that, an average... In fact, when the Farenheit scale was first made up (by Mr. Farenheit, of course) "normal" body temperature was scaled at 100 degrees Farenheit. (Celcius is SO much better, I wish the US would adopt the metric system... 100 for boiling water, 0 for freezing... at STP of course... so simple!) Anyway, I certainly don't have hypothyroidism, and my average temperature hovers around a nice cool 96.8 degrees F (which according to this is lower than low!) Some people run "hot" or "cold" and are perfectly normal, this isn't necessarily an indication of a thyroid problem, though it seems it can be a symptom if you do have a problem. One of the most obvious symptoms of thyroid problems is weight gain/loss or an unusually slow/fast metabolism.

I actually have always had a low body temperature, even before I hit puberty... Also have low blood pressure, the rarest (American) blood type, and sweet veins that run away whenever people try to stick needles in me... It's very pleasant when I give blood or get tests done. (Sarcasm... I hate my veins... nothing but trouble. Good thing I'm not a junkie)

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An average temperature below 97.8 F may reflect low thyroid function, known medically as hypothyroidism. Temperatures above 98.2 f may indicate hyperthyroidism, or elevated thyroid function.

Very important to keep in mind that the "average body temperature" is just that, an average... In fact, when the Farenheit scale was first made up (by Mr. Farenheit, of course) "normal" body temperature was scaled at 100 degrees Farenheit. (Celcius is SO much better, I wish the US would adopt the metric system... 100 for boiling water, 0 for freezing... at STP of course... so simple!) Anyway, I certainly don't have hypothyroidism, and my average temperature hovers around a nice cool 96.8 degrees F (which according to this is lower than low!) Some people run "hot" or "cold" and are perfectly normal, this isn't necessarily an indication of a thyroid problem, though it seems it can be a symptom if you do have a problem. One of the most obvious symptoms of thyroid problems is weight gain/loss or an unusually slow/fast metabolism.

I actually have always had a low body temperature, even before I hit puberty... Also have low blood pressure, the rarest (American) blood type, and sweet veins that run away whenever people try to stick needles in me... It's very pleasant when I give blood or get tests done. (Sarcasm... I hate my veins... nothing but trouble. Good thing I'm not a junkie)

are you aware this is talking about taking ur temperature under your armpit?

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are you aware this is talking about taking ur temperature under your armpit?

Yes, I believe that's what you said in the original post. Doesn't matter where I take my temperature, it's always much lower than "normal."

Technically, the closer you get to the "center" of your body the more accurate the temperature reading will be. But sticking a thermometer in my liver isn't exactly practical. We were talking about averages... well, even taking your temperature is an average! :)

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I actually have hypothyroidism since I checked to see what it was a month or so ago. My temperature is like 1 or 2 degrees below normal. I only eat broccoli and take selenium occasionally though. Broccoli is an everyday thing and I hope it can help me out.

somewhere within the broccoli post it was stated that to get the effects of broccoli needed to regulate the thyroid it must either be raw or be in the pill form. The pills I take are broccolive from new chapter and contain other extracts as well. I believe the extracts are from sprouted seeds and theres like 225 mg broccoli and 45 mg of cauliflower, cabbage, mustard, kelp and something else.

Broccoli and Goitrogens

Broccoli contains goitrogens, naturally-occurring substances in certain foods that can interfere with the functioning of the thyroid gland. Individuals with already existing and untreated thyroid problems may want to avoid broccoli for this reason. Cooking may help to inactivate the goitrogenic compounds found in food. However, it is not clear from the research exactly what percent of goitrogenic compounds get inactivated by cooking, or exactly how much risk is involved with the consumption of broccoli by individuals with pre-existing and untreated thyroid problems.

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=9

strange

are you aware this is talking about taking ur temperature under your armpit?

Yes, I believe that's what you said in the original post. Doesn't matter where I take my temperature, it's always much lower than "normal."

Technically, the closer you get to the "center" of your body the more accurate the temperature reading will be. But sticking a thermometer in my liver isn't exactly practical. We were talking about averages... well, even taking your temperature is an average! :)

ahh i see. so wouldnt it be safe to say that if your armpit temperature was proportionate to the average thyroid temperature then your thyroid is functioning properly.

Broccoli and Goitrogens

Broccoli contains goitrogens, naturally-occurring substances in certain foods that can interfere with the functioning of the thyroid gland. Individuals with already existing and untreated thyroid problems may want to avoid broccoli for this reason. Cooking may help to inactivate the goitrogenic compounds found in food. However, it is not clear from the research exactly what percent of goitrogenic compounds get inactivated by cooking, or exactly how much risk is involved with the consumption of broccoli by individuals with pre-existing and untreated thyroid problems.

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=9

Is Broccoli Bad for the Thyroid?

I have low thyroid function and am being treated with thyroid hormone replacement. I’ve recently become concerned about eating cruciferous vegetables, which I understand can interfere with thyroid synthesis. Should I avoid them?

-- Peg

No, you should keep enjoying them. It is true that cruciferous vegetables such as cabbage, kale, Brussels sprouts, broccoli and cauliflower contain natural chemicals called goitrogens (goiter producers) that can interfere with thyroid hormone synthesis. Other foods that contain these chemicals include corn, sweet potatoes, lima beans, turnips, peanuts, cassava (YUCA), canola oil and soybeans. Fortunately, the goitrogens in these foods are inactivated by cooking, even by light steaming, so there is no need to forego the valuable antioxidant and cancer- protective effects cruciferous vegetables afford.

However, if you habitually eat a lot of cruciferous vegetables raw, you should let your physician know. A simple blood test can reveal whether or not the dose of the thyroid hormone replacement drug you are taking is adequate. You should have a blood test once a year in any event.

http://www.drweil.com/u/QA/QA355093/

you can't trust anything, your source says one thing, and mine says the opposite. I like to go by what actually works for real people who talk about it. check out the broccoli pills forum http://www.acne.org/messageboard/index.php?showtopic=94583

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I don't think it'll hurt me too much...

And wait a second, I got swollen glands last year due to my thyroid which is supposed to be hyperthroidism. I'm so confused now.

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I got my thyroid tests back, apparently I have too low of TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone)...and I've been classified with hypothyroidism. My iodine levels are normal, but I've requested a full spectrum thyroid test.

My liver tests also came back bad, with high levels of ALT...which can be caused by congestive heart failure or liver disease. So ugh...

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