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discharge51

rotating antifungals for candida

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hi, any candida busters here?

in the giant candida thread someone mentioned rotating antifungals.

regarding rotating antifungals for candida. how often do you switch the antifungals?

would it be ok if i did something like this(e.g. using 3 antifungals:1)garlic cloves,2)coconut oil, and 3)oregano oil)---->swallow a couple of garlic cloves for three days, drink coconut oil for next three days, oregano oil next three days, then switch back to garlic cloves for three days, then repeat?

is that how it works? or are you supposed to rotate the antifungals each day? E.g. garlic cloves first day, coconut oil 2nd day, oregano oil 3rd day, garlic clove 4rth day etc?

i went a naturopathic doctor here in toronto and she advised using acidophilus from a company called new roots for those in toronto canada. ideally, she advises using a more expensive brand called HMF replete from genestra(this costs like 43 bucks canadian/week which is not cool:(, but is supposedly the most destructive/potent brand know to man, woman ,beast and candida. she said antifungals are more optional compared to the probiotics, but i want to try the antifungals out in addition.

anyone know the best times to take probiotics? by itself? right before a meal? while eating a meal? after a meal?

and lastly,do you space them away from the times when you take antifungals?

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I can't really answer your questions but you might find www.askshelley.com helpful. There's a lot of info in the FAQ and you can search the forums there...

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here's my experience with the whole thing

Very potent anti-fugals are horrible tasting and usually make you stink and have a rapid die-off reaction, you might feel a bit weird after taking them, and you might break out for a few days when you start taking them. Also, they are expensive.

Medium solution I've found are olive leaf extract, but it's not efficient for more than two weeks, if you start taking a lower dose and build up, you'll be ok with that.

Extra virgin coconut oil can be taken long term and still be effective, and although it taste strong, it won't make your breath smell and it's tolerable to eat raw. Since you can buy a good bottle for $30 and it can last you a good 2 months, it's probably the best value too.

However, it's not the strongest. I'd still recommend it over most other solutions, but keep in mind it takes a few days to start working, I think it helps more with stabilizing blood sugar levels and that's how it helps to battle off candida... although I could be wrong.

Good luck

ps. Not all the extra virgin coconut oils are the same, do a bit of research to find which one is the best & available near you.

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Garlic, oregano oil and coconut oil are what worked the best for me, personally. The first and last you can cook with (eat garlic raw) and the 2nd you can buy in tincture form at a health food store. Oregano oil may be the most potent, too. For any of these, one of the best ways to take them is put them in a glass filled with 1tbsp. psyllium husk, tsp. olive oil for dilution, and the rest water. It'll form a thick gel in your body and sweep the intestines for candida, bad bacteria and other undesirable things. Try doing antifungal treatment for 7-10 days on, then 2 weeks of restoring good bacteria (do the shake but with probiotic powder / kefir). Then repeat with more antifungal treatment as needed.

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thanks for the advice guys.

one q for rubber sheep:

you mentioned taking probiotics as a shake?

so, i would mix my probitic powder with one tbsp olive oil, one tbsp psyllium husk,

and the rest water?

assuming this would allow the probitics to enter the intestine more easily, but will the olive oil and psyliium

husk affect the probitoic in any negative way?(e.g. bad food combining)

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the psyllium creates a gel-like texture and assists the probiotics in getting all the way through the intestines. the soluble fiber is also food for good bacteria. as far as the olive oil, i guess it just assists in getting the probiotics to 'stick' on the mucous surfaces. i got this from askshelley.com and tried it and it's been helping because i was doing the oregano oil / psyllium shake for about a week and guess i didn't replenish good bacteria fast enough cuz i was having bad digestion and alternating diarrhea and constipation for about 10 days and wondering why, because i was still taking probiotic pills (but i guess not enough, because with the pills i was getting maybe 15billion daily, and the powder 30-40). i thought all the probiotics would die in powder form from stomach acid but i guess psylliums digestion doesn't involve hydrochloric acid? not positive on that. either way i saw results doing shelley's method and that's my story, so i'm gonna continue buying powders now instead of the pills, specically Jarrow brand :)

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Could be the psyllium itself causing the problems, Rubber sheep. From what I've read, it doesn't agree with a lot of people, me included. It seemed to cause more problems than it solved for me. My colon hydrotherapist recommends flax over psyllium. Flaxseed tea undid what the psyllium did for me. Guess it's all about experimentation!

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yes, i heard the powder form of probiotics is more potent for sure rubbersheep!

but they're usually more expensive unfortunately. my doc advises using hmf replete which comes in powder form(for those in toronto area).

either way, i'm willing to shell out the extra bananas

for them, at least initially til i'm sucked dry.

CjB, thanks for the input. I'll try flax if the psyllium doesnot work out.

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flax breaks me out horribly. psyllium only caused a problem in the beginning, when i started supplementing with L-Glutamine it started working wonderfully.

Either way, have some kind of fiber in the shake whether its psylium flax or whatever!

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the psyllium creates a gel-like texture and assists the probiotics in getting all the way through the intestines. the soluble fiber is also food for good bacteria.

Actually, I've heard just the OPPOSITE of all that, and it was on the label of an expensive set of products that was designed for colon health. They made the claim that psyllium actually depletes the body of beneficial bacteria, and if I remember correctly (this was a few years ago), they even had a couple of medical citations to back it up. I've also read in other places that it is INsoluble fiber, not soluble fiber, which stimulates the growth of those beneficial bugs.

I don't really claim to know the exact truth and who is right and who is wrong, but be careful about issues like these when there are conflicting claims and counter-claims.

i got this from askshelley.com

THAT in particular doesn't exactly inspire me with confidence! ;)

Bryan

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Well ya know, people can spew data when they're marketing a product too you obviously. But I'll check into the soluble vs. insoluble claim. What I know is people with IBS are told to avoid insoluble and that soluble is their friend because insoluble can be very irritating, possibly because it's really scraping the walls away. Either way all I know is I'm seeing good results with the probiotics mixed with psyllium thing, much better then when with pills.

Psyllium husk

Psyllium seed husk (best known under the brand Metamucil). Psyllium husk may reduce the risk of heart disease by lowering cholesterol levels, and is known to help alleviate the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome, though it often causes uncomfortable bloating. Psyllium husk is often labeled a "bulk-forming laxative," which can be misleading, because it can also help diarrhea and it does not cause bowel dependency.

Because bacteria that occur naturally in the intestinal tract can digest the fiber in psyllium husk and cause it to ferment, psyllium husk fiber supplements can cause gas.

The FDA allows foods containing 0.75 g of psyllium husk fiber or 1.7 g of oat fiber to claim that they may be able to reduce the risk of heart disease (J Am Diet Assoc 2002).

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