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Hey all, I'm new here. hihi.

I've been doing some research as to what pure natural oils and butters do not clog pores. I'm on Tazorac cream .1% and while it's harsh it does seem to work, and of course I'm flaking all over the place right now (only been on it a week). Regular lotions rather sting, even ones without AHA's or salicylic acid. So I've been using this pure shea butter/emo oil butter that this lady makes - with really good results so far if you can handle having a greasy face all night - but I'm just wondering if anyone here has feedback.

So far it seems like there is a lot of misonformation out there, mostly spread by cosmetics makers. It seems that Emu oil and Shea butter don't clog pores, and neither does jojoba or (surprisingly) beeswax (apparently the molecules are too large to clog pores and it sits on top of your skin like Vaseline...which apparently also doesn't clog pores???). Cocoa butter and coconut oils DO seem to clog pores, though.

Anyone else ever look into this, or have anything to add? My problem isn't pimples per se so much as tiny bumps under the skin that cause me to look, well, *bumpy*, and occasionally spreading pores. =( So obviously I'd rather not add to that.

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From what I understand, animal oils like lanolin oil are the most likely to clog pores because they resemble human sebum closely when compared with other oils. Emu oil for some reason does not seem to be particularly problematic, though. Waxy thickeners are also likely to clog pores, so I would be wary of the beeswax, though I do not know about that ingredient in particular.

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i think i broke out in cysts wen i last used Jojoba... but it might of been related to other things i was doin... i never was sure...

anyone else have this problem?

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i think i broke out in cysts wen i last used Jojoba... but it might of been related to other things i was doin... i never was sure...

anyone else have this problem?

You're not alone! I had the same problem when I first started using jojoba oil. But then I read about people jessfoliating with jojoba, and I also came across this thread:

http://www.acne.org/messageboard/index.php...opic=95280&st=0

Now, when I use jojoba (which is about 2-3 times per week, or whenever I'm feeling dry), I follow the method outlined in the first post and I have had no problems. Rubbing the jojoba in and then washing it off seems to allow just the right amount to soak in without leaving me greasy. It's weird, but before when I used to just leave it on and began beaking out my skin felt overstimulated rather than clogged, if that makes any sense. I guess some people are just sensitive to jojoba.

At any rate, I would recommend trying the method outlined in Romey's thread for using jojoba :)

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mm nope. Not that I can see. In fact, she states that there is no standard for any such thing, and it just depends on the person, more or less.

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mm nope. Not that I can see. In fact, she states that there is no standard for any such thing, and it just depends on the person, more or less.

Paula states that certain ingredients (titanium dioxide, zinc oxide, waxy thickeners, animal oils, etc...) can be problematic for pores. In addition to potentially problematic ingredients, she mentions those that can encourage bacterial growth (certain food ingredients, those with an alkaline pH). Another thing she mentions are irritants like alcohol that can induce clogged pores by prematurely killing skin cells and littering the skin with more dead skin cells than it can naturally slough off. However, she does acknowledge that terms like "non-comedogenic" are not regulated by the FDA and as a result are just flashy marketing terms that don't have any real value. She also realizes that there is no rule from which to go by concerning what will or will not clog a person's pores; everyone is too different. To answer your question, shea butter is a plant lipid and is not likely to be a problem for the pores.

She points out many potentially problematic ingredients in her Ingredient Dictionary:

http://www.cosmeticscop.com/learn/dictionary.asp?TYPE=MAIN

If a particular ingredient you are concerned about does not mention how likely it is to clog pores, try searching what category that ingredient falls under (thickeners, surfectants, etc...).

Some other links you could check are her Battle Plans for Blemishes, Blackheads, and Combination Skin (in that order) below:

http://www.cosmeticscop.com/learn/article....REFER=SKIN&ID=6

http://www.cosmeticscop.com/learn/article....EFER=SKIN&ID=71

http://www.cosmeticscop.com/learn/article....FER=SKIN&ID=174

Also, she lists some potentially problematic products (and which ingredients make them problematic) in her Product Reviews:

http://www.cosmeticscop.com/learn/reviews.asp

(For those of you who are wondering, yes, I have spent LOTS of time on the www.cosmeticscop.com website.)

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Snow queen, that was a really interesting post.

I went to read the links you posted but the first one did not work and the following 3 came up with "This portion of our site is temporarily unavailable."

I really want to read them as I am currently having a hard time finding a suitable moisturiser.

Also you mentioned an irritant like alcohol, does that include Cetyl alcohol, stearyl alcohol and Grain Alcohol?

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Snow queen, that was a really interesting post.

I went to read the links you posted but the first one did not work and the following 3 came up with "This portion of our site is temporarily unavailable."

I really want to read them as I am currently having a hard time finding a suitable moisturiser.

Also you mentioned an irritant like alcohol, does that include Cetyl alcohol, stearyl alcohol and Grain Alcohol?

Hmm... That's odd... All the links work when I click on them. You can go to www.cosmeticscop.com and look on the left side of the screen under "Learn." The Battle Plans are listed under "Skin Care Facts," and the Ingredient Dictionary and Product Reviews have their own direct links.

Grain alcohol is just a nicer, natural-sounding term for ethanol, which is a drying type of alcohol also found in alcoholic beverages (Wikipedia lists grain alcohol as ethanol and the Cosmetics Cop ingredient dictionary lists ethanol as an irritant). Cetyl alcohol is a fatty alcohol used as an emollient, emulsifier, thickener, and carrying agent for other ingredients. Stearyl alcohol is a fatty alcohol used as an emollient and to help keep other ingredients intact in a formulation. Fatty alcohols are not irritants.

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Yes it is odd because all the links work for me today, I am sorry it must have been a problem with my connection yesterday.

Thanks for the info on Grain alcohol, you just made a decison I had to make a lot easier.

I am trying to find an oil free, non-comdonegenic mild moisturiser available from shops in the UK. All the ones available seem to have so many ingredients in. The one I use now is good but it makes my cheeks flush after use. I do not know what ingredient is causing this.

From the link you provided

Aqua, seems OK.

Propylene Glycol, seems OK.

C12-15 Alkyl Benzoate, no info.

Cetyl ALcohol, seems OK (as you said).

Cyclomethicone, seems OK.

Stearyl Alcohol, seems OK (as you said).

Menthly Lactate, not sure about this on but probably not casuing my flushing.

Propylene Glycol Isostearate, seems OK.

Stearic Acid, seems OK.

Glycereal Stearate, Oil so not sure.

Salicylic Acid, seems OK.

PEG-100 Stearate, seems OK.

Sodium Hydroxide, "Skin irritant in higher concentrations".

Dimethicone, seems OK.

Sodium Isostearoyl Lactlyate, Not listed.

Acrylates/C10-30 AlkylAcrylate Crosspolymer, Possible skin sensitiser.

Carbomer, seems OK.

Disodium EDTA, seems OK,

Phenoxyethanol, seems OK,

Methylparaben, Ethylparaben, Propylparaben, Bytylparaben, Isobutylparaben -[FPT1158], Not sure.

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I think you mistyped one of the terms (did you mean "menthyl" lactate?). If so, here is the definition:

menthyl lactate. Used as a cooling agent and fragrance in cosmetics. It is a derivative of menthol and is supposed to be less irritating than menthol. See counter-irritant and menthol

I would be very cautious of that ingredient given its relationship to menthol and its cosmetic uses.

C12-15 alkyl benzoate is an emollient and thickener. Sodium Isostearoyl Lactlyate sounds like an emollient or thickener of some sort.

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Yes I meant Menthyl lactate. I read that definition and was not sure if it could be the cause of my flushing or not, but I should be wary of it.

I order mandelic acid for my blackheads from Garden of Wisdom.

They sell Hyaluronic acid for hydration and Emu oil. As far as you know are these ok for sensitive, acne prone, rosacea skin?

Hyaluronic acid serum 1% strength infused with Rooibos (red) Tea Extract

Emu oil.

Apparently a 75% HAserum 25% Emu oil mix is good for.

Your help is appreciated.

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Mandelic acid is an alpha hydroxy acid which has some characteristics of a beta hydroxy acid, making it better able to penetrate the skin than other alpha hydroxy acids used in cosmetics. Alpha hydroxy acids and beta hydroxy acids work best in products having a pH of around 4 or lower. It seems acceptable for use on rosacea-prone skin, though everyone is different. I personally find that salicylic acid, a beta hydroxy acid, is gentler to my skin than alpha hydroxy acids I've used, probably because of its relationship to aspirin. However, I have never used mandelic acid so cannot comment on it from personal experience. It seems to be a good alternative to those who are allergic to salicylic acid.

http://www.chemicalland21.com/industrialch...ELIC%20ACID.htm

There are no problems I can see with hyaluronic acid, emu oil, or red tea (also known as black tea), as long as the formulations that include those ingredients contain no irritants.

Hyaluronic acid is a good humectant which helps the skin retain moisture and mimics the structure of healthy skin, though it has no permanent effect on the skin's structure.

Emu oil is a soothing emolient. Generally, animal oils are more likely to clog the pores than other oils because they resemble human sebum, though emu oil itself seems to have a low rate of comedogenicy.

Tea extracts are anti-inflammatory agents and good antioxidants.

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Mandelic acid is an alpha hydroxy acid which has some characteristics of a beta hydroxy acid, making it better able to penetrate the skin than other alpha hydroxy acids used in cosmetics. Alpha hydroxy acids and beta hydroxy acids work best in products having a pH of around 4 or lower. It seems acceptable for use on rosacea-prone skin, though everyone is different. I personally find that salicylic acid, a beta hydroxy acid, is gentler to my skin than alpha hydroxy acids I've used, probably because of its relationship to aspirin. However, I have never used mandelic acid so cannot comment on it from personal experience. It seems to be a good alternative to those who are allergic to salicylic acid.

http://www.chemicalland21.com/industrialch...ELIC%20ACID.htm

There are no problems I can see with hyaluronic acid, emu oil, or red tea (also known as black tea), as long as the formulations that include those ingredients contain no irritants.

Hyaluronic acid is a good humectant which helps the skin retain moisture and mimics the structure of healthy skin, though it has no permanent effect on the skin's structure.

Emu oil is a soothing emolient. Generally, animal oils are more likely to clog the pores than other oils because they resemble human sebum, though emu oil itself seems to have a low rate of comedogenicy.

Tea extracts are anti-inflammatory agents and good antioxidants.

I really appreciate you help.

I emailed the supplier and the Hyaluronic acid serum 1% strength infused with Rooibos (red) Tea Extract and

Emu oil are apparently "pure with no other additives".

Yes I read about Emu oil from P G's ingredient dictionary and apparently it has a lower incidence of comedogenicity than mineral oil.

In your opinion should I use both in a 75/25% mix or is that overkill? If so I will try the HA serum alone.

I get dry skin on my jaw, chin and outer cheeks after a shave and have a constantly oily nose and inner cheeks, do I still need to moisturise my nose/inner cheeks? It seems funny adding moisturiser to the oily parts.

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I don't see why the 75% hyaluronic acid serum with the 25% emu oil would be a problem given the types of ingredients that they are.

You do not need to moisturize areas that are not dry; if you do moisturize oily skin, you could actually be increasing the risk of clogged pores because the moisturizer would mix with the excess sebum and "glue" dead skin cells to the skin's surface.

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