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At Home Treatments

A few things to consider when attempting household treatments:

  • Most do not work. If you have only a very minor problem with acne and want to have fun experimenting with things you can find in your kitchen to make your skin slightly more clear, go for it. But if you have regular breakouts, you are most likely better off learning about and implementing proven treatments.
     
  • They may not be cheaper. Many drugstore-type over-the-counter treatments are actually quite inexpensive when you break it down to how much you spend per day by using them. When you compare this cost to, for instance, squeezing the juice from 2 lemons a day to apply that to your skin, you might be surprised to find that the over-the-counter medication is less expensive. 
     
  • They can be dangerous. Some home remedies, like crushing aspirin and dissolving it in water to make an aspirin mask, can be hard to dose, and can be dangerous. If you are using any home remedy, learn about it first and proceed with caution.

Latest in At Home Treatments

At Home Treatments Acne Home Remedies Most home remedies for acne do not approximate the benefit of proven over-the-counter or prescription acne medications, and can potentially be dangerous if used incorrectly.... September 18, 2019
At Home Treatments Alternative Therapies for Acne Meditation/yoga, acupuncture, eating healthy, and exercise all help reduce inflammation in the body. Since acne is at its core an inflammatory disease, these "alternative therapies" might help reduce acne symptoms. June 14, 2019
At Home Treatments Baking Soda and Acne Baking soda may be slightly antibacterial, but it is also abrasive and can cause skin irritation, which could lead to breakouts. Also, it is alkaline, and the skin is acidic, which is not a good match. Therefore, baking soda is likely not a good idea for an at-home acne treatment. June 04, 2019
At Home Treatments Can African Black Soap Help Acne? There is no compelling evidence that African black soap will help with acne. In fact, since it is soap, and soap can irritate the skin and aggravate acne, like other soaps, it should be avoided for people with acne-prone skin. June 01, 2019
At Home Treatments Can Aloe Help Acne? Available scientific evidence shows us that aloe is unlikely to improve acne. This could be partially because aloe is unstable once removed from the plant... June 21, 2019
At Home Treatments Can an Egg White Mask Help Your Acne? Egg whites are antibacterial, and acne is in part a bacterial disease. They might also help heal the skin to some degree. For these reasons, when applied to the skin, egg whites might hypothetically help reduce acne, but this is yet unproven. June 21, 2019
At Home Treatments Can Applying Toothpaste to the Skin Treat Acne? Even though you may have heard that toothpaste can help spot treat a pimple, it is unlikely to do much good, if any, and flouride-based toothpastes, which make up the vast majority of toothpastes, may irritate the skin, which can theoretically make acne worse. June 22, 2019
At Home Treatments Can Applying Yogurt to the Skin Improve Acne? Since yogurt is a probiotic and also contains lactic acid, it is possible that it could help with acne. Both probiotics and lactic acid have shown promise in acne treatment. However, we have no research directly looking at yogurt and acne. It could help, but probably not dramatically. August 28, 2019
At Home Treatments Can Honey Masks Help Clear Acne? Honey is antibiotic, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and can help heal wounds. However, the one study we have on honey and acne shows that it is likely not effective against acne specifically. June 21, 2019
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