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White Fox

Member Since 09 Oct 2007
Offline Last Active May 30 2013 11:18 AM

Posts I've Made

In Topic: Gut Flora And Leaky Gut. After 5 Years I Finally Found The Root Cause And I...

22 May 2013 - 07:13 AM

White Fox, you're a savior. At first i was having little progress with acne still appearing on my chin at times, but after cutting out potatoes i am seeing major improvements. I've been doing this for say 5 weeks now, but only very seriously the past 2. I always knew I had hormonal acne but did not realise that leaky gut caused hormonal imbalance. The spots i get are usually big clusters of whiteheads on the sides of my chin only and blackheads on nose.

 

What I've been having success with is taking a probiotic morning and night.

Having 1 - 1.5g of inulin (prebiotic fiber) morning and night. - THIS HAS DONE WONDERS

Using ACV to aid with digestion before eating. - ALSO great as it seems to dry up my acne.

Taking a minimum of 50mg zinc on empty stomach each day
Taking a licorice root extract capsule to help heal gut.

 

I have recently had a small breakout and the return of oily skin, (nothing major) after consuming goats milk as I used when making kefir. I am going to try using coconut milk instead. 

 

I am 100% sure I have leaky gut. I did accutane in 2010 and was clear for 2 years. I thought I would never have to deal with this shit again but I do and I am kind of glad in a way as I have learnt so much these last few months from reading these boards and doing research. My acne made a comeback in January and spread very quickly but I have now got it under control through this gut diet. My problem now is dealing with the red marks.

 

 

Please could Whitefox or anyone else who has got rid of the acne through healing the gut tell me if it is possible to eat grains, gluten and dairy again in the future? This is my only worry.

I will never go back to the way I used to eat, thinking of it now it was disgusting. But if say I went on holiday in the future I would like to be able to enjoy a burger or something with friends on occasion say once a week. WILL I BE ABLE TO DO THIS?



 

Hey, does anyone know if it is ok to eat olives? I mean if you follow a paleo/candida diet?
As i am cutting my intake on carbs and increase on good fats in order to have enough calories to not loose too much weight, i wonder if kalamati olives are good or bad for me. It doesnt contain any carbs which is good beacuse there is a very low glycemic index, but does it contain something else that is bad for the gut? For example, does it contain anti-nutrients like many legumes and grains have?
Thanks!


Olives are great;smile.png

White fox, please can you tell me if after consuming probiotics for a long period of time will i eventually be able to break the diet say once a week when eating out with friends and not get acne? And what are your thoughts on colostrum for healing the holes in my gut?? thanks and please reply

 

Good to hear that you're seeing great results.

 

You don't have to follow the diet as strict forever; read my previous replies in this thread and you'll find answers to your questions.

Eat more probiotics and prebiotics!


In Topic: Gut Flora And Leaky Gut. After 5 Years I Finally Found The Root Cause And I...

14 January 2013 - 10:48 AM

Hey, does anyone know if it is ok to eat olives? I mean if you follow a paleo/candida diet?
As i am cutting my intake on carbs and increase on good fats in order to have enough calories to not loose too much weight, i wonder if kalamati olives are good or bad for me. It doesnt contain any carbs which is good beacuse there is a very low glycemic index, but does it contain something else that is bad for the gut?  For example, does it contain anti-nutrients like many legumes and grains have?
Thanks!


Olives are great;:)

In Topic: Gut Flora And Leaky Gut. After 5 Years I Finally Found The Root Cause And I...

04 January 2013 - 04:40 AM

I already mentioned this piece in this post, particularly and how he doesn't have any sources for celiac and gut flora (notice his source is only for lactose intolerance). I'd like to see studies in humans for different kinds of intolerances.


If you perform a couple of searches on pubmed you will find several studies and reviews on the connection between gut microbiota and food intolerance, allergy and hypersensitivity.

One example:
Role of gut microbiota in food tolerance and allergies.

But yes, there is still a lot of research left to be done in this field, especially studies on specific food intolerances are lacking for several reasons.

In Topic: Gut Flora And Leaky Gut. After 5 Years I Finally Found The Root Cause And I...

03 January 2013 - 12:14 PM

^^I hope the reference to humans as "herbivores" was a typo.


I think he uses the word Herbivore in the sense that humans are able to digest and extract energy from plant foods, not that we are supposed to live exclusively on plants. Actually, if you see the anti-inflammatory diet he recommends, a lot of animal products are included:)

In Topic: Gut Flora And Leaky Gut. After 5 Years I Finally Found The Root Cause And I...

03 January 2013 - 03:51 AM

Food intolerance

I feel the need to repost this information from Dr. Art Ayers (PhD in Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology. Worked at numerous institutions, including assistant professor in the Cell and Developmental Biology Department at Harvard University)

http://coolinginflam...ntolerance.html

Genetics of Food Intolerance

Food intolerance is based on missing bacteria in the the gut rather than inadequacy of human enzymes, e.g. lactase, or altered immune system.

I make the extreme statement that food intolerance is not genetic, to emphasize that the vast majority of intolerance can be cured by changing the bacterial composition of the gut's microbiological community, the gut flora, rather than attempting to accommodate a permanent deficiency. The two common "intolerances" that are offered by my readers to invalidate my sweeping statement are lactose and gluten (celiac) intolerance.

Lactose Intolerance is Not Due to Inadequate Lactase
Everybody has the same gene for lactase, but some people have altered upstream control elements and continue to express lactase in their intestinal cells after infancy, whereas others don't. The racial pattern of adult lactase expression is an interesting note on human evolution, but is irrelevant with respect to an individual's ability to tolerate the lactose sugar in dairy products.

Lactose is the major sugar present in milk and the ability of the intestines to utilize lactose directly like glucose is a selective advantage for human evolution. Absent that ability, lactose would just pass through the gut without impact. However, bacteria in the colon also have lactose digesting enzymes. These bacteria produce hydrogen and methane gases, and these products in turn can feed other bacteria. If all of the products are consumed, then the lactose has been treated as a soluble fiber and the result is more gut bacteria and a happy gut. If some of the bacteria are missing, then the lactose acts as a laxative, e.g. lactulose, and the bowels are not so happy.

All that is needed to cure lactose intolerance, as in all food intolerances, is to provide the gut bacteria that are missing to fully metabolize the offending sugars or polysaccharides. Just continuing to eat dairy without also eating or introducing new species of bacteria into your gut, will just provide more symptoms, but eating yogurt still containing live probiotic bacteria (Read the label. Any live bacteria listed will work.) that have the enzymes to ferment lactose, will lead to a rapid cure. (See reference below.) As the fermenting bacteria grow in the gut, they transfer their genes to gut bacteria in the biofilms lining the gut and these new species of bacteria keep the lactose out of trouble.

The point is that having a food intolerance means that the aggregate of all of the genes in all of your gut microorganisms is lacking the genes/enzymes needed to completely digest a food component. In the case of lactose intolerance, the missing genes are present in typical probiotics, bacteria that grow on milk/lactose.

Celiac is not a Typical Food Intolerance
Celiac is a complex interaction between major toxic proteins in wheat (gliadin), detox gut enzyme (tissue transglutaminase, tTg) and antibodies. Gliadin is a wheat protein adapted to attack the intestines of herbivores. Herbivores, such as insects and humans, can in turn protect themselves from gliadin and other polyglutamine proteins with the enzyme transglutaminase. tTg binds to glutamines in gliadin and converts them to glutamic acids. Unfortunately, while the gliadin is bound to the tTg, inflammation can predispose the gut to present these proteins to the immune system for processing to trigger antibody production. This is the start of the autoimmune disease.

The major histocompatibility antigens (MHAs) code for the proteins that display fragments of proteins on cell surfaces for antigen presentation and immune response. There is a lot of MHA variation and evolutionary adaptation. Some MHAs favor antibody production to gliadin and tTg. This just shows that celiac and grain/gluten intolerance is not a typical food intolerance, which will be remedied by simply altering gut bacteria, even though establishing gut bacteria that metabolize gliadin or that reduce autoimmunity, may be part of the cure.


Enhancing Gut Flora is Part of the Cure for all Autoimmune Diseases
There are rare food allergies, even though the majority are misdiagnosed intolerances. The production of antibodies to food antigens is a symptom of the breakdown in communication between the gut immune system and gut flora. Particular species of bacteria are responsible for the development of both the aggressive and suppressive components of the immune system, which occurs in the lining of the gut. Loss of the suppressive cells, Tregs, can result from unhealthy diets and exposure to antibiotics, and results in autoimmune disease, in which the aggressive immune system is out of control and attacks self antigens.

Symptoms of all autoimmune diseases can be improved by reestablishing normal control of the aggressive part of the immune system via healthy gut flora. Clostridium species of bacteria normally induce healthy development of the suppressive immune system and these types of bacteria are common in soil clinging to fresh vegetables prior to extensive washing. Which of the bacteria that are eaten become established in the gut flora is unpredictable, because the bacteria interact with each other, food and cells lining the gut. The only safe and simple procedure currently available is the fecal transplant. Some experimental fecal transplants are facilitated by the use of encapsulated freeze-dried gut flora. There is great resistance to this simple, safe, cheap approach from the medical industry.

Reference:
Almeida CC, Lorena SL, Pavan CR, Akasaka HM, Mesquita MA. 2012. Beneficial Effects of Long-Term Consumption of a Probiotic Combination of Lactobacillus casei Shirota and Bifidobacterium breve Yakult May Persist After Suspension of Therapy in Lactose-Intolerant Patients. Nutr Clin Pract., 27(2):247-51.