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PrettyInside

Member Since 08 Sep 2009
Offline Last Active Yesterday, 02:37 PM

Posts I've Made

In Topic: A "gentle" (Low-Dose) Probiotic To Try?

11 August 2014 - 07:03 AM

Histamines trigger an allergic response, but you don't have to be "allergic" to a histamine trigger to have a reaction. For instance, tomatoes raise histamines in the body in many histamine -sensitive people...so, the more tomatoes they eat, the more histamine reactions they have. It's not a specific allergy to a particular food/ product...it's more about the histamines each food/product releases in the bloodstream. It's complicated, but I hope this makes sense for now.

If you suspect a histamine intolerance, then stay away from anything fermented. Even probiotics need to be kept to a minimum, with simple strands, until you get used to them

 

That likely explains why I have certain symptoms--like increased fatigue and bodily aches--after eating spaghetti and don't eat it nearly as often anymore.

 

It stinks to have to avoid all fermented foods, since I do like pickles, bread for making a sandwich and sauerkraut on Italian sausage (also on bread...heh). *sigh*

 

 

PB8 (vegetarian version) is a different brand. I recommended 2 brands: PB8 and solgar (acidophilus plus)...both of these work fine for me.

 

Ahhh... Now it all makes sense. :)

 

I took Alternativista's advice and purchased Bacillus coagulans but haven't had the courage to take it yet. Due to my previous experience, there is no risk of me taking any probiotic daily--at least not to start. (Neither my face nor my gut tolerated one capsule of Renew Life's Ultimate Flora brand--15 billion CFU--every third day.) The product I purchased this time around by http://Thorne Research.

 

PI


In Topic: A "gentle" (Low-Dose) Probiotic To Try?

01 August 2014 - 06:58 AM

You could try fermented foods instead. Try drinking water kefir or kombucha. Or add kimchi, sauerkraut, miso, etc to your diet.

 

Well, not if there's an underlying histamine problem. For me, fermented foods are at the top of  the NO list. Wish I could drink kefir and kombucha, but I can't sad.png

 

Anyway, gentle probiots: PB8 vegetarian formula. Soglar Acidophilus Plus.

 

This is the second time in as many weeks that someone's mentioned the food-histamine connection. I know nothing about this, but am I right to believe that it means certain foods cause an allergic reaction (in some form or another)?

 

I can't/won't touch anything dairy-based, so kefir's out. And anything containing yeast--like kombucha--wouldn't be a good option for me, either; I need to cut a ton of things out of my diet, as I'm certain I have Candida overgrowth, at the very least. (I've failed the "spit test" every time I've taken it.)

 

I can't find the PB8 formula on Solgar's website (using the "vegetarian" filter). Is it under another name now? Or could you tell me what bacteria and CFU(s) it contains? And did (or do) you break out from it and continue to use it anyway, or have you never had a problem from taking it?


In Topic: A "gentle" (Low-Dose) Probiotic To Try?

30 July 2014 - 10:22 AM

Have you tried Digestive Enzymes as an alternative?  

 

I currently take Enzymedica's Digest formula; I've not noticed a difference in terms of my constipation but figure it may help my body to assimilate nutrients a bit better.

 

I've not tried Digest + Probiotics; I don't think the CFU (400 million) is enough to do anything, especially if one's gut is overrun by bad bacteria. I suspect that that low of a CFU may be a case of Enzymedica getting something (from paying customers) for nothing. :(

 

So I suppose I'm looking for a product with a CFU in the lower billions. (Again, a product with 15 billion CFU--which has both Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium--caused me both gut and skin issues, so maybe a lower CFU is better. Or maybe it was just the wrong probiotics cocktail for my particular issues.


In Topic: Aha Or Bha? And Can They Diminish Scars?

12 June 2014 - 08:27 AM

What is nodulocystic? I haven't heard that term. I get cysts but thankfully mine do not last months. I can usually get them to come to a head with ice and BP. I have some right now because of the PC 2% BHA liquid. My skin did not like it much for the 3 days I sampled it. I think it was just too penetrating/harsh. I do plan to try it again but only 1x a week or so because it seems so much more powerful.

 

I believe nodulocystic indicates the development of both cysts and nodules.

 

If I decide to try PC 2% BHA--in any form--I'd probably only use it 1-2 times per week, to start.

 

I'm using the 2% BHA  clear toner regular strength. It has brought blackheads up and seems to be clearing my pores pretty well. I know it will take quite some time since my skin is just completely congested.

 

Are you referring to PC 2% toner? I'm guessing so but shouldn't assume. ;)

 

You might try the gel as a sample. Maybe they applied too much? I know many peole say the 2% liquid is oily/greasy and sticky for a long time, but others said it was due to using too much at once and once you apply it lightly, that doesn't happen. *shrug* Just a thought. Did you use a PC 2% toner?

 

That's interesting about PC 2% BHA liquid feeling greasy if too much is applied. I'll have to remember that, in case I do order it.

 

I've not used any PC product.

 

I see paula has come out with a 1% retinol and I'm thinking about trying it out (after my skin is under control). Her site says that it is comparable to a .025% Retin-A. It is supposed to be less irritating, though, since it is 2 steps (I think) below retinoic acid. It's my understanding the skin only converts what it it needs from retinol, so you don't get more than necessary, which is a risk with the pure stuff. But also, I know several people who only use their Retin A every few days to keep the irritation to a minimum. I think I would do the retinol only 1-2x a week.

 

I have a tube of generic Retin-A Micro--Tretinoin Gel Microsphere (0.04%)--which I probably should try one of these days. Granted, I'm a bit reluctant to start it now that we're going into summer. But regardless of when I begin using it, I definitely would only use it a few nights per week, at least in the beginning.

 

The clearest my skin has looked was when I used stridex SA, a 10% glycolic cream, retinol and BP. Not on the same day, I alternated every evening with them but used the SA 2x a day. My skin kept up with it for 3 months before it finally crashed and burned from the dryness. I think SA definitely helps me, so I've upgarded to a better formulation with PC and when my skin is clearer, I plan to use PC 10% glycolic  1x a week and see how that goes. I'm hoping it will help fade the red marks. I might trade that out for the retinol later for the antiaging benefits.

 

I, too, switch between a few topical meds., depending on how my skin is doing. For example, if it's more oily, I'll apply a Sodium Sulfacetamid/Sulfur liquid to my face at night to both nourish my skin and soak up some of the excess oil. But if my skin's less oily--because I've been consuming less oil in my diet--then I'll stick with using a BHA toner (1-2 x's/ day) and Finacea (2 x's/ day). I also use diluted tea tree oil on cysts--especially those that I find before they surface.

 

If you try PC 10% glycolic acid and/or her retinol product(s), let us know how you like them. :)



I'm not sure about the scar issue.  I believe BHA will help fade red marks, but will do nothing for scars. AHA is good for red marks and sun damage, but for scras, well I don't know. It does help build collagen so it may, over time, help somewhat. Concrentration-- all I know is that for AHA, anything over 5% is not reccomended to be used daily. (I read it somewhere but have no reference link)  I don't have a definitive answer on that. However, there is a scar section on the site that has many suggestions pertaining to scar solutions. They may have better idea on treatment options.

 

What's so confusing is a physician's assistant and a skin-care clinician (?) at a derm's office both told me that AHA isn't good for red marks, but for brown marks--i.e., either age-related spots or acne marks that have gone from red/pink to brown in color. They both told me that a retinoid is better for speeding the healing of pink-/ red-colored hyperpigmentation.

 

So confusing... In any case, I'm more focused on finding a better BHA product, since my skin is very oily, and I've clogged pores all over the oily regions of my face (basically all four quadrants and my nose). If it happens to help fade my existing hyperpigmentation and/or helps with collagen growth, all the better.  :)


In Topic: Aha Or Bha? And Can They Diminish Scars?

10 June 2014 - 09:16 PM

Therefore, I believe they work in tandem to keep teh pores cleare. Of course, you can still have pimples from other sources such as stress, hormones, etc, but for the most part, the pores should be clearer and less likely to clog. I have read reviews that BHA has helped stop both cystic and hormonal acne..and some even swear AHA does, too. But, I fully believe that just depends on the person. smile.png You could also incorprorate a retinol product in there to help the cells communicate better and become normalized.

 

I do know someone who's happy using an AHA. But I'm fairly certain that my skin needs a BHA. (I have the permanent clogged pores, along with nodulocystic acne and "regular" inflamed acne that crops up.)

 

I've the generic form of Retin-A Micro but haven't braved trying it; I'm holding out to find a not-overly-harsh BHA product before starting Retin-A. There are some decent reviews for many of Paula's Choice BHA products, but most of them have a 2% concentration. (In the past, that level of BHA--in a toner that I tried--made my skin too irritated: tight, flaky and red.) PC does offer a 1% BHA lotion and a 1% gel; but I don't want a lotion, and a number of people complained that the gel just sits on the skin and even beads up/rubs off.